Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2326

Search results for: nursing student

2326 Happiness of Undergraduate Nursing Students, College of Nursing, Ratchaburi, Thailand

Authors: Paveenapat Nithitantiwat, Kwanjai Pataipakaipet

Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to study the happiness level of nursing students, Boromarajonani College of nursing, Ratchaburi, Thailand. A purposive sampling of 652 first to four-year nursing students was used. This research is descriptive research. The instruments were questionnaires that developed by the researcher. It included the demographic data and nursing student’s perception about healthcare, safety, life security, family, proud of oneself, education and activities, dormitories and environment in college, and how to improve their happiness. Frequencies, percentage, mean, and T-test is used to analysis the data. The results of the research have shown that family and moral value was an important thing in nursing student’s life. In addition, the mean of the happiness level was a high level. The first year nursing students had the higher mean score of the happiness level than the fourth year, second year, and the third year, respectively. Therefore, nursing students would realize that the important things in their life are family and Buddhism’s teaching. In addition, dharma is guideline how to be both academic achievements and successful in life.

Keywords: happiness, nursing students, nursing students’ perceptions, bachelor program

Procedia PDF Downloads 240
2325 Self-Reliant Peer Learning for Nursing Students

Authors: U.-B. Schaer, M. Wehr, R. Hodler

Abstract:

Background: Most nursing students require more training time for necessary nursing skills than defined by nursing schools curriculum to acquire basic nursing skills. Given skills training lessons are too brief to enable effective student learning, meaning in-depth skills practice and repetition various learning steps. This increases stress levels and the pressure to succeed for a nursing student with slower learning capabilities. Another possible consequence is that nursing students are less prepared in the required skills for future clinical practice. Intervention: The Bern College of Higher Education of Nursing, Switzerland, started the independent peer practice learning program in 2012. A concept was developed which defines specific aims and content as well as student’s rights and obligations. Students enlist beforehand and order the required materials. They organize themselves and train in small groups in allocated training location in the area of Learning Training and Transfer (LTT). During the peer practice, skills and knowledge can be repeatedly trained and reflected in the peer groups without the presence of a tutor. All invasive skills are practiced only on teaching dummies. This allows students to use all their potential. The students may access learning materials as literature and their own student notes. This allows nursing students to practice their skills and to deepen their knowledge on corresponding with their own learning rate. Results: Peer group discussions during the independent peer practice learning support the students in gaining certainty and confidence in their knowledge and skills. This may improve patient safety in future daily care practice. Descriptive statics show that the number of students who take advantage of the independent peer practice learning increased continuously (2012-2018). It has to be mentioned that in 2012, solely students of the first semester attended the independent peer practice learning program, while in 2018 over one-third of the participating students were in their fifth semester and final study year. It is clearly visible that the demand for independent peer practice learning is increasing. This has to be considered in the development of future teaching curricula.

Keywords: learning program, nursing students, peer learning, skill training

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2324 Nursing Students’ Opinions about Theoretical Lessons and Clinical Area: A Survey in a Nursing Department

Authors: Ergin Toros, Manar Aslan

Abstract:

This study was planned as a descriptive study in order to learn the opinions of the students who are studying in nursing undergraduate program about their theoretical/practical lessons and departments. The education in the undergraduate nursing programs has great importance because it contains the knowledge and skills to prepare student nurses to the clinic in the future. In order to provide quality-nursing services in the future, the quality of nursing education should be measured, and opinions of student nurses about education should be taken. The research population was composed of students educated in a university with 1-4 years of theoretical and clinical education (N=550), and the sample was composed of 460 students that accepted to take part in the study. It was reached to 83.6% of target population. Data collected through a survey developed by the researchers. Survey consists of 48 questions about sociodemographic characteristics (9 questions), theoretical courses (9 questions), laboratory applications (7 questions), clinical education (14 questions) and services provided by the faculty (9 questions). It was determined that 83.3% of the nursing students found the nursing profession to be suitable for them, 53% of them selected nursing because of easy job opportunity, and 48.9% of them stayed in state dormitory. Regarding the theoretical courses, 84.6% of the students were determined to agree that the question ‘Course schedule is prepared before the course and published on the university web page.’ 28.7% of them were determined to do not agree that the question ‘Feedback is given to students about the assignments they prepare.’. It has been determined that 41,5% of the students agreed that ‘The time allocated to laboratory applications is sufficient.’ Students said that physical conditions in laboratory (41,5%), and the materials used are insufficient (44.6%), and ‘The number of students in the group is not appropriate for laboratory applications.’ (45.2%). 71.3% of the students think that the nurses view in the clinics the students as a tool to remove the workload, 40.7% of them reported that nurses in the clinic area did not help through the purposes of the course, 39.6% of them said that nurses' communication with students is not good. 37.8% of students stated that nurses did not provide orientation to students, 37.2% of them think that nurses are not role models for students. 53.7% of the students stated that the incentive and support for the student exchange program were insufficient., %48 of the students think that career planning services, %47.2 security services,%45.4 the advisor spent time with students are not enough. It has been determined that nursing students are most disturbed by the approach of the nurses in the clinical area within the undergraduate education program. The clinical area education which is considered as an integral part of nursing education is important and affect to student satisfaction.

Keywords: nursing education, student, clinical area, opinion

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2323 Transnational Higher Education: Developing a Transnational Student Success Signature for Clinical Medical Students an Action Research Project

Authors: Wendy Maddison

Abstract:

This paper describes an Action Research project which was undertaken to inform professional practice in order to develop a newly created Centre for Student Success in the specific context of transnational medical and nursing education in the Middle East. The objectives were to enhance the academic performance, persistence, integration and personal and professional development of a multinational study body, in particular in relation to preclinical medical students, and to establish a comfortable, friendly and student-driven environment within an Irish medical university recently established in Bahrain. Expatriating a new part of itself into a corner of the world and within a context which could be perceived as the antithesis of itself, in particular in terms of traditional cultural and organisational values, the university has had to innovate in the range of services, programmes and other offerings which engages and supports the academic success of medical and nursing students as they “encounter the world in the classroom” in the context of an Arab Islamic culture but within a European institution of transnational education, engaging with a global learning environment locally. The outcomes of the project resulted in the development of a specific student success ‘signature’ for this particular transnational higher education context.

Keywords: transnational higher education, medical education, action research, student success, Middle Eastern context, student persistence in the global-local, student support mechanisms

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2322 The Functions of the Student Voice and Student-Centred Teaching Practices in Classroom-Based Music Education

Authors: Sofia Douklia

Abstract:

The present context paper aims to present the important role of ‘Student voice’ in the music classroom which contributes to a more student-centered music education. My aim is to focus on the functions of the student voice through the music spectrum, which have been born in the music classroom. The music curriculum, the principles of a student-centered music education, the role of students and music teachers as music ambassadors have been considered as the major music parameters of student voice. And what is better than referring into the authentic words of a great music educator as John Paynter? How important is to elicit the student voice in the music classroom? What is the role of the music teachers in UK Music Education?

Keywords: student's voice, student-centred education, music ambassators, music teachers

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2321 Developing a Toolkit of Undergraduate Nursing Student’ Desirable Characteristics (TNDC) : An application Item Response Theory

Authors: Parinyaporn Thanaboonpuang, Siridej Sujiva, Shotiga Pasiphul

Abstract:

The higher education reform that integration of nursing programmes into the higher education system. Learning outcomes represent one of the essential building blocks for transparency within higher education systems and qualifications. The purpose of this study is to develop a toolkit of undergraduate nursing student’desirable characteristics assessment on Thai Qualifications Framework for Higher education and to test psychometric property for this instrument. This toolkit seeks to improve on the Computer Multimedia test. There are three skills to be examined: Cognitive skill, Responsibility and Interpersonal Skill, and Information Technology Skill. The study was conduct in 4 phases. In Phase 1. Based on developed a measurement model and Computer Multimedia test. Phase 2 two round focus group were conducted, to determine the content validity of measurement model and the toolkit. In Phase 3, data were collected using a multistage random sampling of 1,156 senior undergraduate nursing student were recruited to test psychometric property. In Phase 4 data analysis was conducted by descriptive statistics, item analysis, inter-rater reliability, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The resulting TNDC consists of 74 items across the following four domains: Cognitive skill, Interpersonal Skill, Responsibility and Information Technology Skill. The value of Cronbach’ s alpha for the four domains were .781, 807, .831, and .865, respectively. The final model in confirmatory factor analysis fit quite well with empirical data. The TNDC was found to be appropriate, both theoretically and statistically. Due to these results, it is recommended that the toolkit could be used in future studies for Nursing Program in Thailand.

Keywords: toolkit, nursing student’ desirable characteristics, Thai qualifications framework

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2320 Participation in Co-Curricular Activities of Undergraduate Nursing Students Attending the Leadership Promoting Program Based on Self-Directed Learning Approach

Authors: Porntipa Taksin, Jutamas Wongchan, Amornrat Karamee

Abstract:

The researchers’ experience of student affairs in 2011-2013, we found that few undergraduate nursing students become student association members who participated in co-curricular activities, they have limited skill of self-directed-learning and leadership. We developed “A Leadership Promoting Program” using Self-Directed Learning concept. The program included six activities: 1) Breaking the ice, Decoding time, Creative SMO, Know me-Understand you, Positive thinking, and Creative dialogue, which include four aspects of these activities: decision-making, implementation, benefits, and evaluation. The one-group, pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research was designed to examine the effects of the program on participation in co-curricular activities. Thirty five students participated in the program. All were members of the board of undergraduate nursing student association of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi. All subjects completed the questionnaire about participation in the activities at beginning and at the end of the program. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and dependent t-test. The results showed that the posttest scores of all four aspects mean were significantly higher than the pretest scores (t=3.30, p<.01). Three aspects had high mean scores, Benefits (Mean = 3.24, S.D. = 0.83), Decision-making (Mean = 3.21, S.D. = 0.59), and Implementation (Mean=3.06, S.D.=0.52). However, scores on evaluation falls in moderate scale (Mean = 2.68, S.D. = 1.13). Therefore, the Leadership Promoting Program based on Self-Directed Learning Approach could be a method to improve students’ participation in co-curricular activities and leadership.

Keywords: participation in co-curricular activities, undergraduate nursing students, leadership promoting program, self-directed learning

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2319 Using a Phenomenological Approach to Explore the Experiences of Nursing Students in Coping with Their Emotional Responses in Caring for End-Of-Life Patients

Authors: Yun Chan Lee

Abstract:

Background: End-of-life care is a large area of all nursing practice and student nurses are likely to meet dying patients in many placement areas. It is therefore important to understand the emotional responses and coping strategies of student nurses in order for nursing education systems to have some appreciation of how nursing students might be supported in the future. Methodology: This research used a qualitative phenomenological approach. Six student nurses understanding a degree-level adult nursing course were interviewed. Their responses to questions were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Finding: The findings identified 3 main themes. First, the common experience of ‘unpreparedness’. A very small number of participants felt that this was unavoidable and that ‘no preparation is possible’, the majority felt that they were unprepared because of ‘insufficient input’ from the university and as a result of wider ‘social taboos’ around death and dying. The second theme showed that emotions were affected by ‘the personal connection to the patient’ and the important sub-themes of ‘the evoking of memories’, ‘involvement in care’ and ‘sense of responsibility’. The third theme, the coping strategies used by students, seemed to fall into two broad areas those ‘internal’ with the student and those ‘external’. In terms of the internal coping strategies, ‘detachment’, ‘faith’, ‘rationalization’ and ‘reflective skills’ are the important components of this part. Regarding the external coping strategies, ‘clinical staff’ and ‘the importance of family and friends’ are the importance of accessing external forms of support. Implication: It is clear that student nurses are affected emotionally by caring for dying patients and many of them have apprehension even before they begin on their placements but very often this is unspoken. Those anxieties before the placement become more pronounced during and continue after the placements. This has implications for when support is offered and possibly its duration. Another significant point of the study is that participants often highlighted their wish to speak to qualified nurses after their experiences of being involved in end-of-life care and especially when they had been present at the time of death. Many of the students spoke that qualified nurses were not available to them. This seemed to be due to a number of reasons. Because the qualified nurses were not available, students had to make use of family members and friends to talk to. Consequently, the implication of this study is not only to educate student nurses but also to educate the qualified mentors on the importance of providing emotional support to students.

Keywords: nursing students, coping strategies, end-of-life care, emotional responses

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2318 Student-Athletes Self-Concept, GPA and Training in the Climate of Social Networking

Authors: Indhumathi Gopal, Ashley Johnson

Abstract:

Social media use for communication among college student-athletes is growing. There is little research on student-athletes use of Blogs, one of the online communication tool outlets. Twenty-seven student-athletes, aged 18-24 years completed a student perception questionnaire which assessed demographics, the effect of blogging on college student-athletes self-concept, the correlation of age, GPA and blogging as well as the training students received in the use of social media. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were analyzed examined. Results indicated a significant correlation between use of Blogs and student age (p < .01) and student GPA earned (p < .01). With respect to self-concept, results suggest that blogging could be a useful tool for communication but can present challenges, could affect student self-esteem either, positively or negatively. The training student-athletes received in the use of social media was not adequate. College athletes’ can more easily divulge information about their personal lives and opinions on social media and challenge the athletic programs and their own future. The findings of the study suggest implications for student-athletes to be better prepared for the current media climate.

Keywords: college student-athletes, self-concept, use of social media training, social networking

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2317 A Qualitative Student-Perspective Study of Student-Centered Learning Practices in the Context of Irish Teacher Education

Authors: Pauline Logue

Abstract:

In recent decades, the Irish Department of Education and Skills has pro-actively promoted student-center learning methodologies. Similarly, the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning has advocated such strategies, aligning them with student success. These developments have informed the author’s professional practice as a teacher educator. This qualitative student-perspective study focuses on a review of one pilot initiative in the academic year 2020-2021, namely, the implementation of universal design for learning strategies within teacher education, employing student-centered learning strategies. Findings included: that student-centered strategies enhanced student performance and success overall, with some minor evidence of student resistance. It was concluded that a dialogical review with student teachers on prior learning experiences (from intellectual and affective perspectives) and learning environments (physical, virtual, and emotional) could facilitate greater student ownership of learning. It is recommended to more formally structure such a dialogical review in a future delivery.

Keywords: professional practice, student-centered learning, teacher education, universal design for learning

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2316 Increasing Student Engagement in Online Educational Leadership Courses

Authors: Mark Deschaine, David Whale

Abstract:

Utilization of online instruction continues to increase at universities, placing more emphasis on the exploration of issues related to adult graduate student engagement. This reflective case study reviews non-traditional student engagement in online courses. The goals of the study are to enhance student focus, attention and interaction. Findings suggest that interactivity seemed to be a key in keeping students involved and achieving, with specific activities routinely favored by students. It is recommended that time spent engaging students is worthwhile and results in greater course satisfaction and academic effort.

Keywords: online learning, student achievement, student engagement, technology

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2315 Evaluating the Effect of Nursing Ethics Education on Nursing Students' Sensitivity and Moral Judgments

Authors: Hsiao Lu Lee

Abstract:

This study was based Quasi-experimental design. The study explored the relationships of nursing ethics education, nursing students’ moral sensitivity and moral judgments in Taiwan. A total of 242 nursing students (NS) participated the study.The proposed teaching nursing ethics from 2 to 16 weeks. Three questionnaires were adopted in this study. First, Demographic of nursing students questionnaire; Second, the questionnaire is Taiwan’s Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire for Student Nurses (TMMSQ-SN); Third, Defining Issues Test (DIT). The pre-test data were collected during the first week, and the post-test data was collected during the 17ᵗʰ week of the semester. The purpose of the study is explored evaluating the effect of nursing ethics education on nursing students’ moral sensitivity and moral judgments. The results of the study showed that moral sensitivities and moral judgments have been significantly improved after 16 weeks (Pair-t=--11.10***; Pair-t=-7.393***). Moral sensitivities and moral judgments were significant in the pretest. There was a negative correlation, but there was no correlation between moral sensitivity and moral judgments in the post-test. There was a significant correlation between the moral judgments (DIT)and the hours of work and other ethical courses (r=.28**; r=.015*). Nursing ethics education is necessary for nursing students in Taiwan. The nursing ethics courses are necessary to improve nursing students’ moral sensitivity and moral judgment (DIT).

Keywords: defining issues test, moral judgments, moral sensitivity, nursing ethics education, nursing students

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2314 Knowledge, Awareness and Practices Concerning of Breast Cancer among Nursing Students in Sri Lanka

Authors: Vimarshi Sandamali Godigamuwa

Abstract:

Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Its incidence is increasing and young women affected more than ever. Nursing students are the future nurses who will have the opportunity to encourage and influence women to be aware of breast cancers. Objectives: To determine the level of knowledge, awareness and practices concerning of breast cancer among Sri Lankan student nurses. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted on 150 nursing students who are in their 2nd and 3rd year studies by distributing a standard self-administered questionnaire. The completed questionnaire were retrieved, graded and scored. Results: Mean age of the respondents was 24.27; (SD=1.66) years and ranged from 20-30 years. Most of the students were female which was 85%. 32% of nursing students scored below 55% for the questionnaire and only 7.3% had good overall knowledge and awareness of breast cancer. Out of 128 female students 89.9% were answered that they know how to perform Breast Self Examination (BSE), out of which 37% of them performed BSE regularly. Only 33% were aware of recommended age for BSE and 10% were knew the recommended age for mammography. 9.3% were aware of frequency for Clinical Breast Examination on 20-39 years of age group. Of the female participants, 11.7% reported positive family history of breast cancer. Conclusion: Nursing students should explore to health educational programs on regular basis on breast cancer and its screening methods. Further studies are needed to identify reasons for not practicing BSE.

Keywords: breast cancer, student nurses, knowledge, awareness, practice, BSE

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2313 Perception of Nursing Care of Patients in a University Hospital

Authors: Merve Aydin, Mağfiret Kara Kaşikçi

Abstract:

Aim: To determine the perceptions of inpatients about care at Farabi Hospital in KTU. Material and Method: This research was conducted by using the universe known examples of formulas and probability selected by sampling method with 277 chosen patients in the hospital at least 14 days in other internal and surgical clinics except for pediatric, psychiatry, and intensive care unit services between January-March 2014 in KTU Farabi Hospital. The data was collected through the forms of nursing care perception scale of patients and defining characteristics of patients. In the evaluation of data, percentage, mean, Mann Whitney U, Student t and Kurskall Wallis tests were applied. Results: The average point the patients got in nursing care perception scale is 62.64±10.08’dir. 48.7 % of patients regard nursing care well and 36.8 % of them regard it very well. 19 % of the patients regard nursing care badly. When the age, sex, occupation, marital status, educational background, residential place, income level, hospitalization period, hospitalization clinic and having a hospital attendant were compared with nursing care perception average point, the difference among point averages was not found meaningful statistically (p > 0.05). The average point of nursing care perception was found greater in those having chronic disease (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The perception point of patients about nursing care is above the average according to the average of the lowest and highest points. The great majority of patients regard nursing care well or very well.

Keywords: hospital, patient, perception of nursing care, nursing care

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2312 Learning and Teaching Styles of Student Nurses

Authors: Jefferson S. Galanza, Jewel An Mischelle R.Camcam, Alyssa Karryl C. Co, Stephanie P. De Guzman, Jet Jet K. Dongui-is, Rodolfo Dane C. Frias, Ovelle C. Jueco, Harvey L. Matbagan, Victoria Luzette T. Rillon, Christelle Romyna H. Saruca, Jeanette Roma M. Villasper

Abstract:

Background: Amidst numerous studies conducted on learning styles of students from a variety of courses, levels and school, a recent study recommended a great need for research on learning styles of student nurses. Moreover, related literatures have not been found exploring both the learning and teaching style of student nurses. Aims: The study aimed to determine the learning and teaching styles of student nurses and if there is an association between them. It also intended to discover whether student nurses are unimodal or multimodal in their styles and identified which faculty teaching style affords maximum outcome for student’s learning styles. Methods: Quantitative Descriptive-Correlational design was used. Participants were randomly selected 312 student nurses at School of Nursing X, Baguio City, Philippines. The questionnaire utilized a modified version of an adopted tool from Fleming’s VARK learning style version 7.2 (Visual, Auditory, Reader/Writer, Kinaesthetic) and Grasha’s teaching styles (Formal Authority, Demonstrator, Facilitator, Delegator). SPSS 19 was used for statistical treatment of data, where Chi square was used for the correlation of unimodal learning and teaching styles. Results/Finding: Majority of student nurses’ learning style is Kinesthetic and their teaching style is Demonstrator, which was also found to be significantly associated. Moreover, 8 out of 10 students are Unimodal in their learning and teaching modalities. In general, their preferred faculty teaching style is similar to their teaching style, which supports the concept, that teachers teach the way they learn. Conclusion: Study concludes that student nurses’ learning styles and teaching styles are varied, which exemplifies the uniqueness of every learner.This diversity in styles provided more evidence that a variety of mode of teaching and learning should be used by faculty and students to increase learning outcome and academic achievement. Recommendation: Future studies could be carried out in various schools of nursing utilizing faculty as respondents. Conduct assessment of learning style at the onset of classes/clinical placements so that faculty will become aware of the diversity of learners leading them to deliver diverse teaching methods.

Keywords: learning, learning styles, teaching styles, student nurses

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2311 RFID Based Student Attendance System

Authors: Aniket Tiwari, Ameya London

Abstract:

Web-based student attendance management system is required to assist the faculty and the lecturer for the time-consuming process. For this purpose, GSM/GPRS (Global System for Mobile Communication/General Packet Radio Service) based student’s attendance management system using RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is a much convenient method to take the attendance. Student is provided with the RFID tags. When student comes near to the reader, it will sense the respective student and update attendance. The whole process is controlled using the microcontroller. The main advantage of this system is that it reduced the complexity comparison to student attendance system using RF technology. This system requires only one microcontroller for the operation, it is real time process. This paper reviews some of these monitoring systems and proposes a GPRS based student attendance system. The system can be easily accessed by the lecturers via the web and most importantly, the reports can be generated in real-time processing, thus, provides valuable information about the students’ commitments in attending the classes.

Keywords: RFID reader, RFID tags, student, attendance

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2310 Student Learning and Motivation in an Interculturally Inclusive Classroom

Authors: Jonathan H. Westover, Jacque P. Westover, Maureen S. Andrade

Abstract:

Though learning theories vary in complexity and usefulness, a thorough understanding of foundational learning theories is a necessity in today’s educational environment. Additionally, learning theories lead to approaches in instruction that can affect student motivation and learning. The combination of a learning theory and elements to enhance student motivation can create a learning context where the student can thrive in their educational pursuits. This paper will provide an overview of three main learning theories: (1) Behavioral Theory, (2) Cognitive Theory, and (3) Constructivist Theory and explore their connection to elements of student learning motivation. Finally, we apply these learning theories and elements of student motivation to the following two context: (1) The FastStart Program at the Community College of Denver, and (2) An Online Academic English Language Course. We discussed potential of the program and course to have success in increasing student success outcomes.

Keywords: learning theory, student motivation, inclusive pedagogy, developmental education

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2309 The Ultimate Challenge of Teaching Nursing

Authors: Crin N. Marcean, Mihaela A. Alexandru, Eugenia S. Cristescu

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By definition, nursing means caring. It is a profession within the health care sector focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain or recover optimal health and quality of life. However, there is a subtle difference between the two: nursing is widely considered as an art and a science, wherein caring forms the theoretical framework of nursing. Nursing and caring are grounded in a relational understanding, unity, and connection between the professional nurse and the patient. Task-oriented approaches challenge nurses in keeping care in nursing. This challenge is on-going as professional nurses strive to maintain the concept, art, and act of caring as the moral centre of the nursing profession. Keeping the care in nursing involves the application of art and science through theoretical concepts, scientific research, conscious commitment to the art of caring as an identity of nursing, and purposeful efforts to include caring behaviours during each nurse-patient interaction. The competencies, abilities, as well as the psycho-motor, cognitive, and relational skills necessary for the nursing practice are conveyed and improved by the nursing teachers’ art of teaching. They must select and use the teaching methods which shape the personalities of the trainers or students, enabling them to provide individualized, personalized care in real-world context of health problems. They have the ultimate responsibility of shaping the future health care system by educating skilful nurses.

Keywords: art of nursing, health care, teacher-student relationship, teaching innovations

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2308 The Relationship between the Competence Perception of Student and Graduate Nurses and Their Autonomy and Critical Thinking Disposition

Authors: Zülfiye Bıkmaz, Aytolan Yıldırım

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This study was planned as a descriptive regressive study in order to determine the relationship between the competency levels of working nurses, the levels of competency expected by nursing students, the critical thinking disposition of nurses, their perceived autonomy levels, and certain socio demographic characteristics. It is also a methodological study with regard to the intercultural adaptation of the Nursing Competence Scale (NCS) in both working and student samples. The sample of the study group of nurses at a university hospital for at least 6 months working properly and consists of 443 people filled out questionnaires. The student group, consisting of 543 individuals from the 4 public university nursing 3rd and 4th grade students. Data collection tools consisted of a questionnaire prepared in order to define the socio demographic, economic, and personal characteristics of the participants, the ‘Nursing Competency Scale’, the ‘Autonomy Subscale of the Sociotropy – Autonomy Scale’, and the ‘California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory’. In data evaluation, descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests, Rasch analysis and correlation and regression tests were used. The language validity of the ‘NCS’ was performed by translation and back translation, and the context validity of the scale was performed with expert views. The scale, which was formed into its final structure, was applied in a pilot application from a group consisting of graduate and student nurses. The time constancy of the test was obtained by analysis testing retesting method. In order to reduce the time problems with the two half reliability method was used. The Cronbach Alfa coefficient of the scale was found to be 0.980 for the nurse group and 0.986 for the student group. Statistically meaningful relationships between competence and critical thinking and variables such as age, gender, marital status, family structure, having had critical thinking training, education level, class of the students, service worked in, employment style and position, and employment duration were found. Statistically meaningful relationships between autonomy and certain variables of the student group such as year, employment status, decision making style regarding self, total duration of employment, employment style, and education status were found. As a result, it was determined that the NCS which was adapted interculturally was a valid and reliable measurement tool and was found to be associated with autonomy and critical thinking.

Keywords: nurse, nursing student, competence, autonomy, critical thinking, Rasch analysis

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2307 The Perception on 21st Century Skills of Nursing Instructors and Nursing Students at Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi

Authors: Kamolrat Turner, Somporn Rakkwamsuk, Ladda Leungratanamart

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The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the perception of 21st century skills among nursing professors and nursing students at Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi. A total of 38 nursing professors and 75 second year nursing students took part in the study. Data were collected by 21st century skills questionnaires comprised of 63 items. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings. The results have shown that the overall mean scores of the perception of nursing professors on 21st century skills were at a high level. The highest mean scores were recorded for computing and ICT literacy, and career and leaning skills. The lowest mean scores were recorded for reading and writing and mathematics. The overall mean scores on perception of nursing students on 21st century skills were at a high level. The highest mean scores were recorded for computer and ICT literacy, for which the highest item mean scores were recorded for competency on computer programs. The lowest mean scores were recorded for the reading, writing, and mathematics components, in which the highest item mean score was reading Thai correctly, and the lowest item mean score was English reading and translate to other correctly. The findings from this study have shown that the perceptions of nursing professors were consistent with those of nursing students. Moreover, any activities aiming to raise capacity on English reading and translate information to others should be taken into the consideration.

Keywords: 21st century skills, perception, nursing instructor, nursing student

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2306 Evaluation of a Higher Diploma in Mental Health Nursing Using Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Effects on Student Behavior, Attitude and Perception

Authors: T. Frawley, G. O'Kelly

Abstract:

The UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems Higher Diploma in Mental Health (HDMH) nursing programme commenced in January 2017. Forty students successfully completed the programme. Programme evaluation was conducted from the outset. Research ethics approval was granted by the UCD Human Research Ethics Committee – Sciences in November 2016 (LS-E-16-163). Plan for Sustainability: Each iteration of the programme continues to be evaluated and adjusted accordingly. Aims: The ultimate purpose of the HDMH programme is to prepare registered nurses (registered children’s nurse (RCN), registered nurse in intellectual disability (RNID) and registered general nurse (RGN)) to function as effective registered psychiatric nurses in all settings which provide care and treatment for people experiencing mental health difficulties. Curriculum evaluation is essential to ensure that the programme achieves its purpose, that aims and expected outcomes are met and that required changes are highlighted for the programme’s continuing positive development. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in the evaluation. A series of questionnaires were used (the majority pre and post programme) to determine student perceptions of the programme, behaviour and attitudinal change from commencement to completion. These included the student assessment of learning gains (SALG); mental health knowledge schedule (MAKS); mental health clinician attitudes scale (MICA); reported and intended behaviour scale (RIBS); and community attitudes towards the mentally ill (CAMI). In addition, student and staff focus groups were conducted. Evaluation methods also incorporated module feedback. Outcome/Results: The evaluation highlighted a very positive response in relation to the achievement of programme outcomes and preparation for future work as registered psychiatric nursing. Some areas were highlighted for further development, which have been taken cognisance of in the 2019 iteration of the programme.

Keywords: learning gains, mental health, nursing, stigma

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2305 Research Related to the Academic Learning Stress, Reflected into PubMed Website Publications

Authors: Ramona-Niculina Jurcau, Ioana-Marieta Jurcau, Dong Hun Kwak, Nicolae-Alexandru Colceriu

Abstract:

Background: Academic environment led, in time, to the birth of some research subjects concluded with many publications. One of these issues is related to the learning stress. Thus far, the PubMed website displays an impressive number of papers related to the academic stress. Aims: Through this study, we aimed to evaluate the research concerning academic learning stress (ALS), by a retrospective analysis of PubMed publications. Methods: We evaluated the ALS, considering: a) different keywords as - ‘academic stress’ (AS), ‘academic stressors’ (ASs), ‘academic learning stress’ (ALS), ‘academic student stress’ (ASS), ‘academic stress college’ (ASC), ‘medical academic stress’ (MAS), ‘non-medical academic stress’ (NMAS), ‘student stress’ (SS), ‘nursing student stress’ (NS), ‘college student stress’ (CSS), ‘university student stress’ (USS), ‘medical student stress’ (MSS), ‘dental student stress’ (DSS), ‘non-medical student stress’ (NMSS), ‘learning students stress’ (LSS), ‘medical learning student stress’ (MLSS), ‘non-medical learning student stress’ (NMLSS); b) the year average for decades; c) some selection filters provided by PubMed website: Article types - Journal Article (JA), Clinical Trial (CT), Review (R); Species - Humans (H); Sex - Male (M) and Female (F); Ages - 13-18, 19-24, 19-44. Statistical evaluation was made on the basis of the Student test. Results: There were differences between keywords, referring to all filters. Nevertheless, for all keywords were noted the following: the majority of studies have indicated that subjects were humans; there were no important differences between the number of subjects M and F; the age of participants was mentioned only in some studies, predominating those with teenagers and subjects between 19-24 years. Conclusions: 1) PubMed publications document that concern for the research field of academic stress, lasts for 56 years and was materialized in more than 5.010 papers. 2) Number of publications in the field of academic stress varies depending on the selected keywords: those with a general framing (AS, ASs, ALS, ASS, SS, USS, LSS) are more numerous than those with a specific framing (ASC, MAS, NMAS, NS, CSS, MSS, DSS, NMSS, MLSS, NMLSS); those concerning the academic medical environment (MAS, NS, MSS, DSS, MLSS) prevailed compared to the non-medical environment (NMAS, NMSS, NMLSS). 3) Most of the publications are included at JA, of which a small percentage are CT and R. 4) Most of the academic stress studies were conducted with subjects both M and F, most aged under 19 years and between 19-24 years.

Keywords: academic stress, student stress, academic learning stress, medical student stress

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2304 Assessing the Self-Directed Learning Skills of the Undergraduate Nursing Students in a Medical University in Bahrain: A Quantitative Study

Authors: Catherine Mary Abou-Zaid

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This quantitative study discusses the concerns with the self-directed learning (SDL) skills of the undergraduate nursing students in a medical university in Bahrain. The nursing undergraduate student SDL study was conducted taking all 4 years and compiling data collected from the students themselves by survey questionnaire. The aim of the study is to understand and change the attitudes of self-directed learning among the undergraduate students. The SDL of the undergraduate student nurses has been noticed to be lacking and motivation to actually perform without supervision while out-with classrooms are very low. Their use of the resources available on the virtual learning environment and also within the university is not as good as it should be for a university student at this level. They do not use them to their own advantage. They are not prepared for the transition from high school to an academic environment such as a university or college. For some students it is the first time in their academic lives that they have faced sharing a classroom with the opposite sex. For some this is a major issue and we as academics need to be aware of all issues that they come to higher education with. Design Methodology: The design methodology that was chosen was a quantitative design using convenience sampling of the students who would be asked to complete survey questionnaire. This sampling method was chosen because of the time constraint. This was completed by the undergraduate students themselves while in class. The questionnaire was analyzed by the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), the results interpreted by the researcher and the findings published in the paper. The analyzed data will also be reported on and from this information we as educators will be able to see the student’s weaknesses regarding self-directed learning. The aims and objectives of the research will be used as recommendations for the improvement of resources for the students to improve their SDL skills. Conclusion: The results will be able to give the educators an insight to how we can change the self-directed learning techniques of the students and enable them to embrace the skills and to focus more on being self-directed in their studies rather than having to be put on to a SDL pathway from the educators themselves. This evidence will come from the analysis of the statistical data. It may even change the way in which the students are selected for the nursing programme. These recommendations will be reported to the head of school and also to the nursing faculty.

Keywords: self-directed learning, undergraduate students, transition, statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), higher education

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2303 Unfolding Simulations with the Use of Socratic Questioning Increases Critical Thinking in Nursing Students

Authors: Martha Hough RN

Abstract:

Background: New nursing graduates lack the critical thinking skills required to provide safe nursing care. Critical thinking is essential in providing safe, competent, and skillful nursing interventions. Educational institutions must provide a curriculum that improves nursing students' critical thinking abilities. In addition, the recent pandemic resulted in nursing students who previously received in-person clinical but now most clinical has been converted to remote learning, increasing the use of simulations. Unfolding medium and high-fidelity simulations and Socratic questioning are used in many simulations debriefing sessions. Methodology: Google Scholar was researched with the keywords: critical thinking of nursing students with unfolding simulation, which resulted in 22,000 articles; three were used. A second search was implemented with critical thinking of nursing students Socratic questioning, which resulted in two articles being used. Conclusion: Unfolding simulations increase nursing students' critical thinking, especially during the briefing (pre-briefing and debriefing) phases, where most learning occurs. In addition, the use of Socratic questions during the briefing phases motivates other questions, helps the student analyze and critique their thinking, and assists educators in probing students' thinking, which further increases critical thinking.

Keywords: briefing, critical thinking, Socratic thinking, unfolding simulations

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2302 Theoretical Aspects and Practical Approach in the Research of the Human Capital of Student Volunteer Community

Authors: Kalinina Anatasiia, Pevnaya Mariya

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The article concerns theoretical basis in the research of student volunteering, identifies references of student volunteering as a social community, classifies human capital indicators of student volunteers. Also there are presented the results of research of 450 student volunteers in Russia concerning the correlation between international volunteering and indicators of human capital of youth. Findings include compared characteristics of human capital of “potential” and “real” international student volunteers. Factor analysis revealed two categories of active students categories of active students.

Keywords: human capital, international volunteering, student volunteering, social community, youth volunteering, youth politics

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2301 Status and Image of the Nurse as Perceived by the Public

Authors: Salam Hadid, Mohammad Khatib

Abstract:

The International Council of Nurses-ICN defined nursing as a sphere integrating autonomous and collaborative care intended for the individual, family and community within and outside of the care setting. Nursing as a care profession has developed broadly over recent decades in terms of its essentials, expertise and primarily academically. Despite the impressive growth of the profession, there is still extreme diversity in the public’s perceptions and opinions of the profession and its professionals and in the knowledge on the fundamentals of its true function and spheres of engagement. The current study examines the existing knowledge among the general population regarding the nursing profession. The population consisted of 498 respondents, 236 women and 262 men, age 18-81. The respondents noted that nursing focuses on the technical, and the emotional aspects and promotion of health for the patient are not the nurse’s responsibility. Most of the respondents saw nurses working mainly in hospital and community-based clinic settings. They considered nursing to be a high prestige profession in general, but less prestigious among respondents exposed to healthcare provision. Most of the respondents considered nursing to be a humane profession but without independence and with no need for academic studies. The findings are incompatible with the definition of nursing and its spheres of action as defined in the ICN Code of Ethics. Two suggestions are to work through nursing schools addressing the student nurses, as ambassadors for the profession. The second is using the healthcare encounter between the nursing staff and the public to improve the image of nurses.

Keywords: ethics, nurse image, public, nursing

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2300 Active Learning: Increase Learning through Engagement

Authors: Jihan Albayati, Kim Abdullah

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This poster focuses on the significance of active learning strategies and their usage in the ESL classroom. Active learning is a big shift from traditional lecturing to active student engagement which can enhance and enrich student learning; therefore, engaging students is the core of this approach. Students learn more when they participate in the process of learning such as discussions, debates, analysis, synthesis, or any form of activity that requires student involvement. In order to achieve active learning, teachers can use different instructional strategies that are conducive to learning and the selection of these strategies depends on student learning outcomes. Active learning techniques must be carefully designed and integrated into the classroom to increase critical thinking and student participation. This poster provides a concise definition of active learning and its importance, instructional strategies, active learning techniques and their impact on student engagement. Also, it demonstrates the differences between passive and active learners.

Keywords: active learning, learner engagement, student-centered, teaching strategies

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2299 Student Debt Loans and Labor Market Outcomes: A Lesson in Unintended Consequences

Authors: Sun-Ki Choi

Abstract:

The U.S. student loan policy was initiated to improve the equality of educational opportunity and help low-income families to provide higher education opportunities for their children. However, with the increase in the average student loan amount, college graduates with student loans experience problems and restrictions in their early-career choices. This study examines the early career labor market choices of college graduates who obtained student loans to finance their higher education. In this study, National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) data for 2017 and 2019 was used to estimate the effects of student loans on the employment status and current job wages of graduates with student loans. In the analysis, two groups of workers, those with student loans and those without loans, were compared. Using basic models and Mahalanobis distance matching, it was found that graduates who rely on student loans to finance their education are more likely to participate in the labor market than those who do not. Moreover, in entry-level jobs, graduates with student loans receive lower salaries than those without student loans. College graduates make job-related decisions based on their current and future wages and fringe benefits. Graduates with student loans tend to demonstrate risk-averse behaviors due to their financial restrictions. Thus, student loan debt creates inequity in the early-career labor market for college graduates. Furthermore, this study has implications for policymakers and researchers in terms of the student loan policy.

Keywords: student loan, wage differential, unintended consequences, mahalanobis distance matching

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2298 Integration of Technology for Enhanced Learning among Generation Y and Z Nursing Students

Authors: Tarandeep Kaur

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Generation Y and Z nursing students have a much higher need for technology-based stimulation than previous generations, as they may find traditional methods of education boring and disinterested. These generations prefer experiential learning and the use of advanced technology for enhanced learning. Therefore, nursing educators must acquire knowledge to make better use of technology and technological tools for instruction. Millennials and generation are digital natives, optimistic, assertive, want engagement, instant feedback, and collaborative approach. The integration of technology and the efficacy of its use can be challenging for nursing educators. The SAMR (substitution, augmentation, modification, and redefinition) model designed and developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura can help nursing educators to engage their students in different levels of technology integration for effective learning. Nursing educators should understand that technology use in the classroom must be purposeful. The influx of technology in nursing education is ever-changing; therefore, nursing educators have to constantly enhance and develop technical skills to keep up with the emerging technology in the schools as well as hospitals. In the Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Nursing (SCBSCN) program at Saskatchewan polytechnic, we use technology at various levels using the SAMR model in our program, including low and high-fidelity simulation labs. We are also exploring futuristic options of using virtual reality and gaming in our classrooms as an innovative way to motivate, increase critical thinking, create active learning, provide immediate feedback, improve student retention and create collaboration.

Keywords: generations, nursing, SAMR, technology

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2297 The Link Between Collaboration Interactions and Team Creativity Among Nursing Student Teams in Taiwan: A Moderated Mediation Model

Authors: Hsing Yuan Liu

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Background: Considerable theoretical and empirical work has identified a relationship between collaboration interactions and creativity in an organizational context. The mechanisms underlying this link, however, are not well understood in healthcare education. Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore the impact of collaboration interactions on team creativity and its underlying mechanism and to verify a moderated mediation model. Design, setting, and participants: This study utilized a cross-sectional, quantitative, descriptive design. The survey data were collected from 177 nursing students who enrolled in 18-week capstone courses of small interdisciplinary groups collaborating to design healthcare products in Taiwan during 2018 and 2019. Methods: Questionnaires assessed the nursing students' perceptions about their teams' swift trust (of cognition- and affect-based), conflicts (of task, process, and relationship), interaction behaviors (constructive controversy, helping behaviors, and spontaneous communication), and creativity. This study used descriptive statistics to compare demographics, swift trust scores, conflict scores, interaction behavior scores, and creativity scores for interdisciplinary teams. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and simple and hierarchical multiple regression models. Results: Pearson’s correlation analysis showed the cognition-based team swift trust was positively correlated with team creativity. The mediation model indicated constructive controversy fully mediated the effect of cognition-based team swift trust on student teams’ creativity. The moderated mediation model indicated that task conflict negatively moderates the mediating effect of the constructive controversy on the link between cognition-based team swift trust and team creativity. Conclusion: Our findings suggest nursing student teams’ interaction behaviors and task conflict are crucial mediating and moderated mediation variables on the relationship between collaboration interactions and team creativity, respectively. The empirical data confirms the validity of our proposed moderated mediation models of team creativity. Therefore, this study's validated moderated mediation model could provide guidance for nursing educators to improve collaboration interaction outcomes and creativity on nursing student teams.

Keywords: team swift trust, team conflict, team interaction behavior, moderated mediating effects, interdisciplinary education, nursing students

Procedia PDF Downloads 117