Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 68

Search results for: facilitator

68 Framework for Developing Change Team to Maximize Change Initiative Success

Authors: Mohammad Z. Ansari, Lisa Brodie, Marilyn Goh

Abstract:

Change facilitators are individuals who utilize change philosophy to make a positive change to organizations. The application of change facilitators can be seen in various change models; Lewin, Lippitt, etc. The facilitators within numerous change models are considered as internal/external consultants. Whilst most of the scholarly paper considers change facilitation as a consensus attempt to improve organization, there is a lack of a framework that develops both the organization and the change facilitator creating a self-sustaining change environment. This research paper introduces the development of the framework for change Leaders, Planners, and Executers (LPE), aiming at various organizational levels (Process, Departmental, and Organisational). The LPE framework is derived by exploring interrelated characteristics between facilitator(s) and the organization through qualitative research for understanding change management techniques and facilitator(s) behavioral aspect from existing Change Management models and Organisation behavior works of literature. The introduced framework assists in highlighting and identify the most appropriate change team to successfully deliver the change initiative within any organization (s).

Keywords: change initiative, LPE framework, change facilitator(s), sustainable change

Procedia PDF Downloads 87
67 Energy Service Companies as a Facilitator for Implementation of Energy-Environment Conventions

Authors: Bahareh Arghand

Abstract:

The establishment of rules and regulations for more effective energy-environment interactions are essential to achieving sustainable development. Sustainable development requires mechanisms that can promote compliance in energy-environment conventions. There are many binding agreements and non-binding instruments at regional and international levels on energy and the environment. These conventions try to decrease conflicts of interest between energy, environment and economic by legal principles and practical mechanisms. The major core of conventions is their implementations because the poor implementation and enforcement power affect their success. In this regard, the main goal of this study is proposing the effective implementation mechanisms. Energy service companies' (ESCOs) activities can improve energy efficiency and decrease the environmental degradations. Therefore, it can be proposed and assessed the merit mechanism of ESCO performance as a facilitator to implement energy-environment conventions. An assessment of ESCO performance, including its potentials, problems, and limitations, as a facilitator for effective implementation of the energy-environment convention, is included. This study is oriented towards effective development and application of laws and the function of ESCOs as appropriate economic instruments and facilitator for implementation of energy-environment conventions. The resulting system of close cooperation between the energy-environment conventions and ESCOs is geared toward advancing environmental protection and economic factors by the transfer of environmentally-sound technologies that meet sustainable development objectives.

Keywords: energy-environment conventions, energy service company, facilitator mechanism, sustainable development

Procedia PDF Downloads 108
66 Educational Debriefing in Prehospital Medicine: A Qualitative Study Exploring Educational Debrief Facilitation and the Effects of Debriefing

Authors: Maria Ahmad, Michael Page, Danë Goodsman

Abstract:

‘Educational’ debriefing – a construct distinct from clinical debriefing – is used following simulated scenarios and is central to learning and development in fields ranging from aviation to emergency medicine. However, little research into educational debriefing in prehospital medicine exists. This qualitative study explored the facilitation and effects of prehospital educational debriefing and identified obstacles to debriefing, using the London’s Air Ambulance Pre-Hospital Care Course (PHCC) as a model. Method: Ethnographic observations of moulages and debriefs were conducted over two consecutive days of the PHCC in October 2019. Detailed contemporaneous field notes were made and analysed thematically. Subsequently, seven one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four PHCC debrief facilitators and three course participants to explore their experiences of prehospital educational debriefing. Interview data were manually transcribed and analysed thematically. Results: Four overarching themes were identified: the approach to the facilitation of debriefs, effects of debriefing, facilitator development, and obstacles to debriefing. The unpredictable debriefing environment was seen as both hindering and paradoxically benefitting educational debriefing. Despite using varied debriefing structures, facilitators emphasised similar key debriefing components, including exploring participants’ reasoning and sharing experiences to improve learning and prevent future errors. Debriefing was associated with three principal effects: releasing emotion; learning and improving, particularly participant compound learning as they progressed through scenarios; and the application of learning to clinical practice. Facilitator training and feedback were central to facilitator learning and development. Several obstacles to debriefing were identified, including mismatch of participant and facilitator agendas, performance pressure, and time. Interestingly, when used appropriately in the educational environment, these obstacles may paradoxically enhance learning. Conclusions: Educational debriefing in prehospital medicine is complex. It requires the establishment of a safe learning environment, an understanding of participant agendas, and facilitator experience to maximise participant learning. Aspects unique to prehospital educational debriefing were identified, notably the unpredictable debriefing environment, interdisciplinary working, and the paradoxical benefit of educational obstacles for learning. This research also highlights aspects of educational debriefing not extensively detailed in the literature, such as compound participant learning, display of ‘professional honesty’ by facilitators, and facilitator learning, which require further exploration. Future research should also explore educational debriefing in other prehospital services.

Keywords: debriefing, prehospital medicine, prehospital medical education, pre-hospital care course

Procedia PDF Downloads 114
65 The Roles of Local Administration Management to Promote the Culture Based On Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy

Authors: Sukanya Sripho

Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to study the role of local administration management to promote culture based on philosophy of sufficiency economy to many communities in Thailand. The philosophy was given to the Thai people by their King and become one of the important policies from the Thai government. A total of 375 local people in main district, Amnadcharoen province were selected by random sampling. A questionnaire was used as the tool for collecting data. Descriptive statistics in this research included percentage, mean, and multiple regression analysis. The findings revealed that the role of facilitator was utilized the most from the management in order to promote culture based on philosophy of sufficiency economy to many communities in Thailand.

Keywords: administration, management, philosophy of sufficiency economy, facilitator

Procedia PDF Downloads 323
64 Textile Cottage Industry: A Facilitator for Capacity Building and Youth Empowerment

Authors: Salihu Maiwada

Abstract:

The large scale textile industry in Nigeria was at one time the second largest employer of labor after government. With recent developments and changing situations, there is a serious decline in this sector which consequently forced the local textile industries to close down and the workers retrenched. the category of people worst hit was the youths and the middle age. This paper examines the potentials of the textile cottage industry as a facilitator for capacity building and economic empowerment among the Nigerian youths. The paper focuses on economic viability, persistence, and above-all, its potentials for poverty reduction as well as self employment. The methodology used in the study is the survey method and the instrument used to collect the necessary information is field interview. The results obtained showed that the textile cottage industries are flourishing and the Nigerian youths are engaged in the practice. In addition, the paper suggests areas that require government's financial intervention which will facilitate the establishment and ensure the sustainability of the textile cottage industry. The paper concludes with some recommendations for the youths and for the government.

Keywords: capacity building, economic, empowerment, persistence, sustainability, youths

Procedia PDF Downloads 461
63 EFL Learners' Attitudes towards the Proper Pronunciation of English and towards Podcasts as a Facilitator for Proper Pronunciation

Authors: Riam Almaqrn, Abdulrahman Alshabeb

Abstract:

The study aims to examine the attitudes of Saudi students of English towards proper pronunciation and towards podcasts as a facilitator for proper pronunciation. In order to fulfill the purpose of the study, twenty-three students participated in this study. The study used a questionnaire as the main data collection instrument. The questionnaire included two parts, one or proper pronunciation and the other for podcasts. Data analysis showed that the participants, in spite of the low rate of improvement in their pronunciation, had positive attitudes towards proper pronunciation of English. This outcome is compatible with previous studies` results that assert the fact that having a positive attitude towards a particular language and its speakers can improve pronunciation. As for podcasts, students received a total of five podcasts related to their listening and speaking textbook. At the end of the project, students showed high rate of acceptance for podcasts and positive attitudes towards them. The findings proved the usefulness of examining learners` attitudes towards new CALL applications before using them in a practical way. In the light of the findings, pedagogical implications and suggestions were presented for language instructors and academics.

Keywords: CALL, MALL, podcast, learning English

Procedia PDF Downloads 189
62 Lessons-Learned in a Post-Alliance Framework

Authors: Olubukola Olumuyiwa Tokede, Dominic D. Ahiaga-Dagbui, John Morrison

Abstract:

The project environment in construction has been widely criticised for its inability to learn from experience effectively. As each project is bespoke, learning is ephemeral, as it is often confined within its bounds and seldom assimilated with others that are being delivered in the project environment. To engender learning across construction projects, collaborative contractual arrangements, such as alliancing and partnering, have been embraced to aid the transferability of lessons across projects. These cooperative arrangements, however, tend to be costly, and hence construction organisations could revert to less expensive traditional procurement approaches after successful collaborative project delivery. This research, therefore, seeks to assess the lessons-learned in a post-alliance contractual framework. Using a case-study approach, we examine the experiences of a public sector authority who engaged a project facilitator to foster learning during the delivery of a significant piece of critical infrastructure. It was found that the facilitator enabled optimal learning outcomes in post-alliance contractual frameworks by attenuating the otherwise adversarial relationship between clients and contractors. Further research will seek to assess the effectiveness of different knowledge-brokering agencies in construction projects.

Keywords: facilitation, knowledge-brokering, learning, projects

Procedia PDF Downloads 63
61 An Analysis Study of a Participatory Design Workshop from the Perspectives of Communication Strategies and Tools

Authors: Meng-Yu Wun, Jiunde Lee

Abstract:

Participatory design transfers the role of design team becoming the facilitator who manages to work collaboratively with the 'partners of innovation': users. This facilitator role not just concerns the users’ behaviors or insights under the common practice of user-centered design, it emphasizes the importance of communication experience conducted by various strategies and tools in a workshop session which could profoundly impact the quality of the co-creation process. To investigate the communication experience in the participatory design, this study proposed a qualitative research to analyze communication strategies and tools. A participatory design workshop and following in-depth interviews were carried out to explore how participants (facilitators, users) might apply different strategies and tools to enhance the communication process. The major study findings are as follows: (a) roles had influence on communication experience; facilitators’ principles and methods influenced the usage of facilitation strategies in various situations, while users put more emphasis on communication activities and goals aimed to complete the design tasks, (b) communication tools should be both fixed and changeable: participants had fixed cognition on different forms of communication tools; with the fundamental cognition, they could choose and make use of tools according to their needs, (c) the management of workshop communication should be flexible: controlling the schedule, stimulating innovations, and creating the space for conversation are crucial to facilitate in a participatory workshop.

Keywords: communication experience, facilitation, participatory design, workshop

Procedia PDF Downloads 94
60 Cartel's Little Helpers: A Comparative Study of the Case Law Regarding the Facilitators of Collusion in Latin America Competition Law and Policy

Authors: Andres Calderon

Abstract:

In order to avoid detection and punishment, cartels have recruited the help of third parties to organize, execute and disguise the anticompetitive practices cartel members have agreed upon. These third parties may take the form of consultancy firms, guilds or professional advisors that do not perform an economic activity in the market where the collusion takes place. This paper takes a look into how national competition authorities and national legislators have dealt with the emergence of the cartels’ facilitators in Latin America. Following the practice of other jurisdictions such as United States (Toys R' Us, Apple), European Union (AC Treuhand), United Kingdom (Replica Kits, Hasbro) and Spain (Urban, Snap-On), some countries (e.g. Argentina, Chile) in Latin America have started to conduct investigations and find antitrust liability in cartels’ facilitators for helping others to violate their national competition laws. Some countries (e.g. Peru and Colombia) have also amended their legislation to amplify the subjective scope of application in order to include cartels’ facilitators. The Latin American case is one of special relevance because public officials are often prone to promote or indulge agreements between competitors in sectors of political interest. A broad definition of cartels’ facilitator, consequently, could lead to the prosecution of punishment of public officials that may hinder the competitive process.

Keywords: anticompetitive practices, cartel, collusion, competition, facilitator, hub and spoke

Procedia PDF Downloads 80
59 Designing and Enacting an Adjunct Faculty Self-Study of Teaching Community

Authors: Anastasia P. Samaras, Allison Ward-Parsons, Beth Dalbec, Paula Cristina Azevedo, Anya Evmenova, Arvinder Johri, Lynne Scott Constantine, Lesley Smith

Abstract:

Two cycles of qualitative data were collected. Cycle One sources included participant survey results, participant postings on Blackboard forums, facilitator memos, and meeting notes as well as reflections and notes from whole-group meetings.

Keywords: adjunct faculty, professional development, self-study methodology, teaching

Procedia PDF Downloads 81
58 Corpora in Secondary Schools Training Courses for English as a Foreign Language Teachers

Authors: Francesca Perri

Abstract:

This paper describes a proposal for a teachers’ training course, focused on the introduction of corpora in the EFL didactics (English as a foreign language) of some Italian secondary schools. The training course is conceived as a part of a TEDD participant’s five months internship. TEDD (Technologies for Education: diversity and devices) is an advanced course held by the Department of Engineering and Information Technology at the University of Trento, Italy. Its main aim is to train a selected, heterogeneous group of graduates to engage with the complex interdependence between education and technology in modern society. The educational approach draws on a plural coexistence of various theories as well as socio-constructivism, constructionism, project-based learning and connectivism. TEDD educational model stands as the main reference source to the design of a formative course for EFL teachers, drawing on the digitalization of didactics and creation of learning interactive materials for L2 intermediate students. The training course lasts ten hours, organized into five sessions. In the first part (first and second session) a series of guided and semi-guided activities drive participants to familiarize with corpora through the use of a digital tools kit. Then, during the second part, participants are specifically involved in the realization of a ML (Mistakes Laboratory) where they create, develop and share digital activities according to their teaching goals with the use of corpora, supported by the digital facilitator. The training course takes place into an ICT laboratory where the teachers work either individually or in pairs, with a computer connected to a wi-fi connection, while the digital facilitator shares inputs, materials and digital assistance simultaneously on a whiteboard and on a digital platform where participants interact and work together both synchronically and diachronically. The adoption of good ICT practices is a fundamental step to promote the introduction and use of Corpus Linguistics in EFL teaching and learning processes, in fact dealing with corpora not only promotes L2 learners’ critical thinking and orienteering versus wild browsing when they are looking for ready-made translations or language usage samples, but it also entails becoming confident with digital tools and activities. The paper will explain reasons, limits and resources of the pedagogical approach adopted to engage EFL teachers with the use of corpora in their didactics through the promotion of digital practices.

Keywords: digital didactics, education, language learning, teacher training

Procedia PDF Downloads 95
57 Building Learning Organization: Case Study of Transforming a Banking Company with 21st Century Creative Services Company

Authors: Zeynep Aykul Yavuz

Abstract:

Misconception about design is about making a product pretty. However, the holistic approaches such as design thinking or human-centered design could take the design from making things nice to things inspired by real people and work with real-world limitations. Design thinking helps companies to understand not only problem area but also opportunities. It can be used by any people from any background which provide a space for companies where employees from different departments work together to solve the same problem. While demanding skills changing year to year into the market, previous technical skills are commons anymore. The frontier companies in the sectors look for interactive methods to solve problems. Moreover, the recruiter aims to understand the candidate’s design thinking skills (. The study includes a case study where a 21st century creative services company “ATÖLYE” offers innovation transformation with design thinking to a banking company. Both companies are located in İstanbul in Turkey. The banking company contacted with the ATÖLYE in January 2018 because they heard design thinking in different markets and how it transformed the way of working. The transformation process had 3 phases which were basic training of teams while getting coaching from ATÖLYE’s employees, coaching training with graduates of basic training, facilitator training. Employees built new skills while solving the banking company’s strategic problems. ATÖLYE offered experiential learning which helped employees’ making sense of new skills and knowledge. One day workshops were organized to create awareness about the practice of design thinking. In addition to these, a community of practice was built to create an environment to make reflections and discuss good practice. Not only graduates from the training program but also other employees from the company participated in the community gatherings. ATÖLYE did not train some employees in the company. Rather than that, its aim was to build a contemporary organization for the company. This provided a sustainable system in terms of human resources and motivation. At the beginning of 2020, employees from the first cohort in the basic training who took coaching training and facilitator training have started to design training for different groups in the company. They have considered what could be better in their training experience and designed new ones according to that, so they have been using design thinking to design the design training. This is one of the outcomes which shows the impact of all process clearly.

Keywords: design thinking, learning community, professional development, training, organizational transformation

Procedia PDF Downloads 50
56 Employees’ Work Performance Quality Development for Organizational Competency

Authors: Pornpong Porpraphant

Abstract:

This paper aimed to demonstrate how work performance quality development activity carried out for employees in an organization could lead to the organizational success and competency as a whole. The case studies selected for this research were the Thai huge corporate including Siam Cement Group or SCG, PTT Public Company Limited, and Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand or EGAT. The in- depth interview was applied with the three main groups that included the facilitator group, the managerial group, and the operational officer group. The Plan- Do- Check- Act approach was also utilized as to build up a conceptual model in corporate management that fostered employees’ knowledge acquisition, resulting in an improved work performance.

Keywords: high performance organization, quality, work performance quality development

Procedia PDF Downloads 237
55 Simulating an Interprofessional Hospital Day Shift: A Student Interprofessional (IP) Collaborative Learning Activity

Authors: Fiona Jensen, Barb Goodwin, Nancy Kleiman, Rhonda Usunier

Abstract:

Background: Clinical simulation is now a common component in many health profession curricula in preparation for clinical practice. In the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (RFHS) college leads in simulation and interprofessional (IP) education, planned an eight hour simulated hospital day shift, where seventy students from six health professions across two campuses, learned with each other in a safe, realistic environment. Learning about interprofessional collaboration, an expected competency for many health professions upon graduation, was a primary focus of the simulation event. Method: Faculty representatives from the Colleges of Nursing, Medicine, Pharmacy and Rehabilitation Sciences (Physical Therapy, Occupation Therapy, Respiratory Therapy) and Pharmacy worked together to plan the IP event in a simulation facility in the College of Nursing. Each college provided a faculty mentor to guide the same profession students. Students were placed in interprofessional teams consisting of a nurse, physician, pharmacist, and then sharing respiratory, occupational, and physical therapists across the team depending on the needs of the patients. Eight patient scenarios were role played by health profession students, who had been provided with their patient’s story shortly before the event. Each team was guided by a facilitator. Results and Outcomes: On the morning of the event, all students gathered in a large group to meet mentors and facilitators and have a brief overview of the six competencies for effective collaboration and the session objectives. The students assuming their same profession roles were provided with their patient’s chart at the beginning of the shift, met with their team, and then completed professional specific assessments. Shortly into the shift, IP team rounds began, facilitated by the team facilitator. During the shift, each patient role-played a spontaneous health incident, which required collaboration between the IP team members for assessment and management. The afternoon concluded with team rounds, a collaborative management plan, and a facilitated de-brief. Conclusions: During the de-brief sessions, students responded to set questions related to the session learning objectives and expressed many positive learning moments. We believe that we have a sustainable simulation IP collaborative learning opportunity, which can be embedded into curricula, and has the capacity to grow to include more health profession faculties and students. Opportunities are being explored in the RFHS at the administrative level, to offer this event more frequently in the academic year to reach more students. In addition, a formally structured event evaluation tool would provide important feedback and inform the qualitative feedback to event organizers and the colleges about the significance of the simulation event to student learning.

Keywords: simulation, collaboration, teams, interprofessional

Procedia PDF Downloads 64
54 Purpose-Driven Collaborative Strategic Learning

Authors: Mingyan Hong, Shuozhao Hou

Abstract:

Collaborative Strategic Learning (CSL) teaches students to use learning strategies while working cooperatively. Student strategies include the following steps: defining the learning task and purpose; conducting ongoing negotiation of the learning materials by deciding "click" (I get it and I can teach it – green card, I get it –yellow card) or "clunk" (I don't get it – red card) at the end of each learning unit; "getting the gist" of the most important parts of the learning materials; and "wrapping up" key ideas. Find out how to help students of mixed achievement levels apply learning strategies while learning content area in materials in small groups. The design of CSL is based on social-constructivism and Vygotsky’s best-known concept of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD). The definition of ZPD is the distance between the actual acquisition level as decided by individual problem solution case and the level of potential acquisition level, similar to Krashen (1980)’s i+1, as decided through the problem-solution case under the facilitator’s guidance, or in group work with other more capable members (Vygotsky, 1978). Vygotsky claimed that learners’ ideal learning environment is in the ZPD. An ideal teacher or more-knowledgable-other (MKO) should be able to recognize a learner’s ZPD and facilitates them to develop beyond it. Then the MKO is able to leave the support step by step until the learner can perform the task without aid. Steven Krashen (1980) proposed Input hypothesis including i+1 hypothesis. The input hypothesis models are the application of ZPD in second language acquisition and have been widely recognized until today. Krashen (2019)’s optimal language learning environment (2019) further developed the application of ZPD and added the component of strategic group learning. The strategic group learning is composed of desirable learning materials learners are motivated to learn and desirable group members who are more capable and are therefore able to offer meaningful input to the learners. Purpose-driven Collaborative Strategic Learning Model is a strategic integration of ZPD, i+1 hypothesis model, and Optimal Language Learning Environment Model. It is purpose driven to ensure group members are motivated. It is collaborative so that an optimal learning environment where meaningful input from meaningful conversation can be generated. It is strategic because facilitators in the model strategically assign each member a meaningful and collaborative role, e.g., team leader, technician, problem solver, appraiser, offer group learning instrument so that the learning process is structured, and integrate group learning and team building making sure holistic development of each participant. Using data collected from college year one and year two students’ English courses, this presentation will demonstrate how purpose-driven collaborative strategic learning model is implemented in the second/foreign language classroom, using the qualitative data from questionnaire and interview. Particular, this presentation will show how second/foreign language learners grow from functioning with facilitator or more capable peer’s aid to performing without aid. The implication of this research is that purpose-driven collaborative strategic learning model can be used not only in language learning, but also in any subject area.

Keywords: collaborative, strategic, optimal input, second language acquisition

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53 The Impact of Professional Development on Teachers’ Instructional Practice

Authors: Karen Koellner, Nanette Seago, Jennifer Jacobs, Helen Garnier

Abstract:

Although studies of teacher professional development (PD) are prevalent, surprisingly most have only produced incremental shifts in teachers’ learning and their impact on students. There is a critical need to understand what teachers take up and use in their classroom practice after attending PD and why we often do not see greater changes in learning and practice. This paper is based on a mixed methods efficacy study of the Learning and Teaching Geometry (LTG) video-based mathematics professional development materials. The extent to which the materials produce a beneficial impact on teachers’ mathematics knowledge, classroom practices, and their students’ knowledge in the domain of geometry through a group-randomized experimental design are considered. In this study, we examine a small group of teachers to better understand their interpretations of the workshops and their classroom uptake. The participants included 103 secondary mathematics teachers serving grades 6-12 from two states in different regions. Randomization was conducted at the school level, with 23 schools and 49 teachers assigned to the treatment group and 18 schools and 54 teachers assigned to the comparison group. The case study examination included twelve treatment teachers. PD workshops for treatment teachers began in Summer 2016. Nine full days of professional development were offered to teachers, beginning with the one-week institute (Summer 2016) and four days of PD throughout the academic year. The same facilitator-led all of the workshops, after completing a facilitator preparation process that included a multi-faceted assessment of fidelity. The overall impact of the LTG PD program was assessed from multiple sources: two teacher content assessments, two PD embedded assessments, pre-post-post videotaped classroom observations, and student assessments. Additional data was collected from the case study teachers including additional videotaped classroom observations and interviews. Repeated measures ANOVA analyses were used to detect patterns of change in the treatment teachers’ content knowledge before and after completion of the LTG PD, relative to the comparison group. No significant effects were found across the two groups of teachers on the two teacher content assessments. Teachers were rated on the quality of their mathematics instruction captured in videotaped classroom observations using the Math in Common Observation Protocol. On average, teachers who attended the LTG PD intervention improved their ability to engage students in mathematical reasoning and to provide accurate, coherent, and well-justified mathematical content. In addition, the LTG PD intervention and instruction that engaged students in mathematical practices both positively and significantly predicted greater student knowledge gains. Teacher knowledge was not a significant predictor. Twelve treatment teachers were self-selected to serve as case study teachers to provide additional videotapes in which they felt they were using something from the PD they learned and experienced. Project staff analyzed the videos, compared them to previous videos and interviewed the teachers regarding their uptake of the PD related to content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and resources used.

Keywords: teacher learning, professional development, pedagogical content knowledge, geometry

Procedia PDF Downloads 103
52 Employing a Flipped Classroom Approach to Support Project-Based Learning

Authors: Kian Jon Chua, Islam Md Raisul

Abstract:

Findings on a research study conducted for a group of year-2 engineering students participating in a flipped classroom (FC) experience that is judiciously incorporated into project-based learning (PBL) module are presented. The chief purpose of the research is to identify whether if the incorporation of flipped classroom approach to project-based learning indeed yields a positive learning experience for engineering students. Results are presented and compared from the two classes of students – one is subjected to a traditional PBL learning mode while the other undergoes a hybrid PBL-FC learning format. Some themes related to active learning, problem-solving ability, teacher as facilitator, and degree of self-efficacy are also discussed. This paper hopes to provide new knowledge and insights relating to the introduction of flipped classroom learning to a project-based engineering module. Some potential study limitations and future directions to address them are also presented.

Keywords: hybrid project-based learning, flipped classroom, problem-solving, active learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 61
51 Autonomy not Automation: Using Metacognitive Skills in ESL/EFL Classes

Authors: Marina Paula Carreira Rolim

Abstract:

In order to have ELLs take responsibility for their own learning, it is important that they develop skills to work their studies strategically. The less they rely on the instructor as the content provider, the more they become active learners and have a higher sense of self-regulation and confidence in the learning process. This e-poster proposes a new teacher-student relationship that encourages learners to reflect, think critically, and act upon their realities. It also suggests the implementation of different autonomy-supportive teaching tools, such as portfolios, written journals, problem-solving activities, and strategy-based discussions in class. These teaching tools enable ELLs to develop awareness of learning strategies, learning styles, study plans, and available learning resources as means to foster their creative power of learning outside of classroom. In the role of a learning advisor, the teacher is no longer the content provider but a facilitator that introduces skills such as ‘elaborating’, ‘planning’, ‘monitoring’, and ‘evaluating’. The teacher acts as an educator and promotes the use of lifelong metacognitive skills to develop learner autonomy in the ESL/EFL context.

Keywords: autonomy, metacognitive skills, self-regulation, learning strategies, reflection

Procedia PDF Downloads 296
50 Mathematics Professional Development: Uptake and Impacts on Classroom Practice

Authors: Karen Koellner, Nanette Seago, Jennifer Jacobs, Helen Garnier

Abstract:

Although studies of teacher professional development (PD) are prevalent, surprisingly most have only produced incremental shifts in teachers’ learning and their impact on students. There is a critical need to understand what teachers take up and use in their classroom practice after attending PD and why we often do not see greater changes in learning and practice. This paper is based on a mixed methods efficacy study of the Learning and Teaching Geometry (LTG) video-based mathematics professional development materials. The extent to which the materials produce a beneficial impact on teachers’ mathematics knowledge, classroom practices, and their students’ knowledge in the domain of geometry through a group-randomized experimental design are considered. Included is a close-up examination of a small group of teachers to better understand their interpretations of the workshops and their classroom uptake. The participants included 103 secondary mathematics teachers serving grades 6-12 from two US states in different regions. Randomization was conducted at the school level, with 23 schools and 49 teachers assigned to the treatment group and 18 schools and 54 teachers assigned to the comparison group. The case study examination included twelve treatment teachers. PD workshops for treatment teachers began in Summer 2016. Nine full days of professional development were offered to teachers, beginning with the one-week institute (Summer 2016) and four days of PD throughout the academic year. The same facilitator-led all of the workshops, after completing a facilitator preparation process that included a multi-faceted assessment of fidelity. The overall impact of the LTG PD program was assessed from multiple sources: two teacher content assessments, two PD embedded assessments, pre-post-post videotaped classroom observations, and student assessments. Additional data were collected from the case study teachers including additional videotaped classroom observations and interviews. Repeated measures ANOVA analyses were used to detect patterns of change in the treatment teachers’ content knowledge before and after completion of the LTG PD, relative to the comparison group. No significant effects were found across the two groups of teachers on the two teacher content assessments. Teachers were rated on the quality of their mathematics instruction captured in videotaped classroom observations using the Math in Common Observation Protocol. On average, teachers who attended the LTG PD intervention improved their ability to engage students in mathematical reasoning and to provide accurate, coherent, and well-justified mathematical content. In addition, the LTG PD intervention and instruction that engaged students in mathematical practices both positively and significantly predicted greater student knowledge gains. Teacher knowledge was not a significant predictor. Twelve treatment teachers self-selected to serve as case study teachers to provide additional videotapes in which they felt they were using something from the PD they learned and experienced. Project staff analyzed the videos, compared them to previous videos and interviewed the teachers regarding their uptake of the PD related to content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and resources used. The full paper will include the case study of Ana to illustrate the factors involved in what teachers take up and use from participating in the LTG PD.

Keywords: geometry, mathematics professional development, pedagogical content knowledge, teacher learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 51
49 Herb's Market Development for Capability Poverty Alleviation: Case Study of Bagh- E- Narges Village under Komak Charity's Support

Authors: Seyedeh Afsoon Mohseni

Abstract:

The importance of the approach to the poverty definition is revealed regarding to it’s effect on the nature of planning poverty alleviation programs. This research employs the capability deprivation approach to alleviate rural poverty and seeks to develop herb’s market to alleviate capability poverty with an NGO’s intervene, Komak charity foundation. This research has employed qualitative approach; the data were collected through field observations, review of documents and interviews. Subsequently they were analyses by thematic analysis method. According to the findings, Komak charity can provide the least sustenance of the rural poor and alleviate capability poverty emergence through Herb’s market development of the village. Employing the themes, the market development is planned in two phases of empirical production and product development. Komak charity can intervene as a facilitator by providing micro credits, cooperative and supervising. Furthermore, planning on education and raising participation are prerequisites for the efficiency of the plan.

Keywords: capability poverty, Herb's market development, NGO, Komak charity foundation

Procedia PDF Downloads 377
48 A Qualitative Study: Teaching Fractions with Augmented Reality for 5th Grade Students in Turkey

Authors: Duygu Özdemir, Bilal Özçakır

Abstract:

Usage of augmented reality in education helps students to make sense of the three-dimensional world of mathematics. In this study, it was aimed to develop activities about fractions for 5th-grade students by augmented reality and also aimed to assess these activities in terms of students’ understanding and views. Data obtained from 60 students in a private school in Marmaris, Turkey was obtained through classroom observations, students’ worksheets and semi-structured interviews during two weeks. Data analysis was conducted by using constant-comparative analysis which leads to meaningful categories of findings. Findings of this study indicated that usage of augmented reality is a facilitator to make concretize and provide real-life application for fractions. Moreover, students’ opinions about its usage were lead to categories as benefit for learning, enjoyment and creating awareness of usage of augmented reality in mathematics education. In general, this study could be a bridge to show the contributions of augmented reality applications to mathematics education and also highlights that augmented reality could be used with subjects like fractions rather than subjects only in geometry learning domain.

Keywords: augmented reality, mathematics, fractions, students

Procedia PDF Downloads 123
47 Effect of Problem Based Learning (PBL) Activities to Thai Undergraduate Student Teachers Attitude and Their Achievement

Authors: Thanawit Tongmai, Chatchawan Saewor

Abstract:

Learning management is very important for students’ development. To promote students’ potential, the teacher should design appropriate learning activity that brings their students potential out. Problem based learning has been using worldwide and it has presented numerous of success. This research aims to study third year students’ attitude and their achievement in scientific research course. To find the results, mix method was used to design research conduction. The researcher used PBL and reflection activity in the class. The students had to choose a topic, reviewed information, designed experimental, wrote academic report and presented their research by themselves. The researcher was only a facilitator. Reflection activity was used to progressing and consulting their research. The data was collected along with research conduction by questionnaire and test, including attitude, opinion and their achievement. The result of this study showed that 74.71% from all of students (n = 87) benefited from PBL and reflection activity, while 25.19% were just satisfied. 100% of students had a positive reflection toward PBL activity and they believed that PBL was the best pedagogy method for scientific research course. The achievements of these students were higher than the previous study (P < 0.05). The student’s learning achievement, A, B+ and B, was 48.28, 28.74 and 22.98% respectively. Therefore, it can conclude that PBL activity is appropriate for scientific research course and it can also promote student’s achievement.

Keywords: reflection, attitude, learning, achievement, PBL

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46 Antecedents of Knowledge Sharing: Investigating the Influence of Knowledge Sharing Factors towards Postgraduate Research Supervision

Authors: Arash Khosravi, Mohamad Nazir Ahmad

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Today’s economy is a knowledge-based economy in which knowledge is a crucial facilitator to individuals, as well as being an instigator of success. Due to the impact of globalization, universities face new challenges and opportunities. Accordingly, they ought to be more innovative and have their own competitive advantages. One of the most important goals of universities is the promotion of students as professional knowledge workers. Therefore, knowledge sharing and transferring at tertiary level between students and supervisors is vital in universities, as it decreases the budget and provides an affordable way of doing research. Knowledge-sharing impact factors can be categorized into three groups, namely: organizational, individual and technical factors. There are some individual barriers to knowledge sharing, namely: lack of time and trust, lack of communication skills and social networks. IT systems such as e-learning, blogs and portals can increase knowledge sharing capability. However, it must be stated that IT systems are only tools and not solutions. Individuals are still responsible for sharing information and knowledge. This paper proposes new research model to examine the effect of individual factors and organisational factors, namely: learning strategy, trust culture, supervisory support, as well as technological factor on knowledge sharing in a research supervision process at the University of Technology Malaysia.

Keywords: knowledge management, knowledge sharing, research supervision, knowledge transferring

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45 The Case of ESPRIT (HigherSchool of Engineering)

Authors: Amira Potter

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Since three years, ESPRIT has adopted project-based learning across its curricula. The philosophy behind this reform is to prepare its future engineers to become more operational once they integrate the workplace. It allows them to learn all the required skills expected from them by their future employers. This learner-centered method helps the students take responsibility for their own learning, solve real-world problems and carry out muli-faceted projects. Therefore, the teacher who used to be considered as the detainer of the knowledge has become more of a facilitator and a coach, encouraging their students’ learning process. This innovative way to English teaching has enabled the students to learn the English language differently. The target language is learnt cooperatively through group work, presentations, debating and many other communicative activities. The speaking skill in English language remains by far the most challenging skill for Tunisian students with an educational background based on Arabic as a first language and French as a second language. The student’s initial resistance to speak English in front of their classmates and the way they end up performing their work, shows the real progress they managed to achieve through PBL approach. The article will focus on the positive impact PBL has had on oral fluency among Esprit engineering students and how it has been achieved. It will also describe how speaking skill is taught and assessed at ESPRIT.

Keywords: cooperative, engineer, innovative, project-based learning

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44 Traffic Congestions Modeling and Predictions by Social Networks

Authors: Bojan Najdenov, Danco Davcev

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Reduction of traffic congestions and the effects of pollution and waste of resources that come with them has been a big challenge in the past decades. Having reliable systems to facilitate the process of modeling and prediction of traffic conditions would not only reduce the environmental pollution, but will also save people time and money. Social networks play big role of people’s lives nowadays providing them means of communicating and sharing thoughts and ideas, that way generating huge knowledge bases by crowdsourcing. In addition to that, crowdsourcing as a concept provides mechanisms for fast and relatively reliable data generation and also many services are being used on regular basis because they are mainly powered by the public as main content providers. In this paper we present the Social-NETS-Traffic-Control System (SNTCS) that should serve as a facilitator in the process of modeling and prediction of traffic congestions. The main contribution of our system is to integrate data from social networks as Twitter and also implements a custom created crowdsourcing subsystem with which users report traffic conditions using an android application. Our first experience of the usage of the system confirms that the integrated approach allows easy extension of the system with other social networks and represents a very useful tool for traffic control.

Keywords: traffic, congestion reduction, crowdsource, social networks, twitter, android

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43 Learning Vocabulary with SkELL: Developing a Methodology with University Students in Japan Using Action Research

Authors: Henry R. Troy

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Corpora are becoming more prevalent in the language classroom, especially in the development of dictionaries and course materials. Nevertheless, corpora are still perceived by many educators as difficult to use directly in the classroom, a process which is also known as “data-driven learning” (DDL). Action research has been identified as a method by which DDL’s efficiency can be increased, but it is also an approach few studies on DDL have employed. Studies into the effectiveness of DDL in language education in Japan are also rare, and investigations focused more on student and teacher reactions rather than pre and post-test scores are rarer still. This study investigates the student and teacher reactions to the use of SkELL, a free online corpus designed to be user-friendly, for vocabulary learning at a university in Japan. Action research is utilized to refine the teaching methodology, with changes to the method based on student and teacher feedback received via surveys submitted after each of the four implementations of DDL. After some training, the students used tablets to study the target vocabulary autonomously in pairs and groups, with the teacher acting as facilitator. The results show that the students enjoyed using SkELL and felt it was effective for vocabulary learning, while the teaching methodology grew in efficiency throughout the course. These findings suggest that action research can be a successful method for increasing the efficacy of DDL in the language classroom, especially with teachers and students who are new to the practice.

Keywords: action research, corpus linguistics, data-driven learning, vocabulary learning

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42 'Systems' and Its Impact on Virtual Teams and Electronic Learning

Authors: Shavindrie Cooray

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It is vital that students are supported in having balanced conversations about topics that might be controversial. This process is crucial to the development of critical thinking skills. This can be difficult to attain in e-learning environments, with some research finding students report a perceived loss in the quality of knowledge exchange and performance. This research investigated if Systems Theory could be applied to structure the discussion, improve information sharing, and reduce conflicts when students are working in online environments. This research involved 160 participants across four categories of student groups at a college in the Northeastern US. Each group was provided with a shared problem, and each group was expected to make a proposal for a solution. Two groups worked face-to-face; the first face to face group engaged with the problem and each other with no intervention from a facilitator; a second face to face group worked on the problem using Systems tools to facilitate problem structuring, group discussion, and decision-making. There were two types of virtual teams. The first virtual group also used Systems tools to facilitate problem structuring and group discussion. However, all interactions were conducted in a synchronous virtual environment. The second type of virtual team also met in real time but worked with no intervention. Findings from the study demonstrated that the teams (both virtual and face-to-face) using Systems tools shared more information with each other than the other teams; additionally, these teams reported an increased level of disagreement amongst their members, but also expressed more confidence and satisfaction with the experience and resulting decision compared to the other groups.

Keywords: e-learning, virtual teams, systems approach, conflicts

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41 Political Economy of Social Movements: The Influence of Capitalism on the Emergence of the Feminist Movement in Ukraine

Authors: Nadiya Didyk

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This thesis deals with the unique history of the emergence of the Ukrainian feminist movement. Ukrainian feminism is still in its making, so the field is under-investigated in general. Nevertheless, the perspective of political economy and the enabling and constraining effects of capitalist dynamics are almost absent from the research on the emergence and the development of the feminist movement in Ukraine. This research was inspired by Hetland and Goodwin’s approach and an attempt to test their approach on the case of the Ukrainian feminist movement. Hetland and Goodwin claim that many scholars tend to neglect political economy from analysis of feminism as a new social movements, namely because such movement are not about class or materialist concerns, and thus have no discernible connection to capitalism. Both scholars, however, point out that there at least four ways in which capitalism has been of high importance for any social movement. Accordingly, the following issues are analysed in this paper: capitalism as the facilitator of the emergence and development of Ukrainian feminism; the influence of class balance in society on the formation of the Ukrainian feminist movement, and the ways in which class divisions within the movement shape its goals and strategies. This paper also focuses on the role of capitalist institutions and free wage labour expansion in shaping collective feminist identities and solidarities. Specific attention is paid to the representativeness of women in the highest echelons in business and politics under the capitalist systems. This study shows that there is a significant hole in the literature regarding the feminist movement in Ukraine and aims to motivate further detailed research.

Keywords: feminism, hetland, goodwin, new soical movements, political economy

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40 Effect of Farmers Field School on Vegetables Production in District Peshawar Khyber Pakhtunkhwa-Pakistan

Authors: Muhammad Zafarullah Khan, Sumeera Abbasi

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The Farmers Field School (FFS) aims at benefiting poor farmers by improving their knowledge of existing agricultural technologies and integrated crop management to become independent and confident in their decision. The study on effect of farmer’s field school on vegetables production before and after FFS implementation in district Peshawar in four selected villages on each crop in 2011 was conducted from 80 farmers. The results were compared by using paired t-test. It was observed that 80% of the respondents were satisfied with FFS approach as there was a significant increase in vegetable production. The seed rate of tomato and cucumber decreased from 0.185kg/kanal to 0.1 kg/ kanal and 0.120kg/kanal to 0.01kg/kanal while production of tomato and cucumber were increased from 8158.75kgs/kanal to 1030.25kgs/kanal and 3230kgs/kanal to 5340kgs/kanal, respectively after the activities of FFS. FFS brought a positive effect on vegetable production and technology adoption improving their income, skills and knowledge ultimately lead farmers towards empowerment. The input cost including seed, crop management, FYM, and weedicides for tomato were reduced by Rs.28, Rs. 3170 and Rs.658 and cucumber reduced by Rs.35, Rs.570 and Rs.430. Only fertilizers cost was increased by Rs. 2200 in case of tomato and 465 in case of cucumber. FFS facilitator and coordinator should be more skilled and practical oriented to facilitate poor farmers. In light of the above study, more FFS should be planned so that the more farmers should be benefited.

Keywords: effect, farmer field school, vegetables production, integrated crop management

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39 Priming through Open Book MCQ Test: A Tool for Enhancing Learning in Medical Undergraduates

Authors: Bharti Bhandari, Bharati Mehta, Sabyasachi Sircar

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Medical education is advancing in India, with its advancement newer innovations are being incorporated in teaching and assessment methodology. Our study focusses on a teaching innovation that is more student-centric than teacher-centric and is the need of the day. The teaching innovation was carried out in 1st year MBBS students of our institute. Students were assigned control and test groups. Priming was done for the students in the test group with an open-book MCQ based test in a particular topic before delivering formal didactic lecture on that topic. The control group was not assigned any such exercise. This was followed by formal didactic lecture on the same topic. Thereafter, both groups were assessed on the same topic. The marks were compiled and analysed using appropriate statistical tests. Students were also given questionnaire to elicit their views on the benefits of “self-priming”. The mean marks scored in theory assessment by the test group were statistically higher than the marks scored by the controls. According to students’ feedback, the ‘self-priming “process was interesting, helped in better orientation during class-room lectures and better understanding of the topic. They want it to be repeated for other topics with moderate difficulty level. Better performance of the students in the primed group validates the combination of student-centric priming model and didactic lecture as superior to the conventional, teacher-centric methods alone. If this system is successfully followed, the present teacher-centric pedagogy should increasingly give way to student-centric activities where the teacher is only a facilitator.

Keywords: medical education, open-book test, pedagogy, priming

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