Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

Search results for: hip resurfacing

4 A Biomimetic Uncemented Hip Resurfacing Versus Various Biomaterials Hip Resurfacing Implants

Authors: Karima Chergui, Hichem Amrani, Hammoudi Mazouz, Fatiha Mezaache

Abstract:

Cemented femoral resurfacings have experienced a revival for younger and more active patients. Future developments have shown that the uncemented version eliminates failures related to cementing implants. A three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulation was carried out in order to exploit a new resurfacing prothesis design named MARMEL, proposed by a recent study with Co–Cr–Mo material, for comparing a hip uncemented resurfacing with a novel carbon fiber/polyamide 12 (CF/PA12) composite to other hip resurfacing implants with various bio materials. From FE analysis, the von Mises stress range for the Composite hip resurfacing was much lower than that in the other hip resurfacing implants used in this comparison. These outcomes showed that the biomimetic hip resurfacing had the potential to reduce stress shielding and prevent from bone fracture compared to conventional hip resurfacing implants.

Keywords: biomechanics, carbon–fibre polyamide 12, finite element analysis, hip resurfacing

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3 Ulnar Parametacarpal Flap for Coverage of Fifth Finger Defects: Propeller Flap Concept

Authors: Ahmed M. Gad, Ahmed S. Hweidi

Abstract:

Background: Defects of the little finger and adjacent areas are not uncommon. It could be a traumatic, post-burn, or after contracture release. Different options could be used for resurfacing these defect, including skin grafts, local or regional flaps. Ulnar para-metacarpal flap described by Bakhach in 1995 based on the distal division of the dorsal branch of the ulnar artery considered a good option for that. In this work, we applied the concept of propeller flap for better mobilization and in-setting of the ulnar para-metacarpal flap. Methods: The study included 15 cases with 4 females and 11 male patients. 10 of the patients had severe post-burn contractures of little finger, and 5 had post-traumatic little finger defects. Contractures were released and resulting soft tissue defects were reconstructed with propeller ulnar para-metacarpal artery flap. The flap based on two main perforators communicating with the palmar system, it was raised based on one of them depending on the extent of the defect and rotated 180 degrees after judicious dissection of the perforator. Results: 13 flaps survived completely, one of the cases developed partial skin loss, which healed by dressing, another flap was completely lost and covered later by a full-thickness skin graft. Conclusion: Ulnar para-metacarpal flap is a reliable option to resurface the little finger as well as adjacent areas. The application of the propeller flap concept based on whether the proximal or distal communicating branch makes the rotation and in-setting of the flap easier.

Keywords: little finger defects, propeller flap, regional hand defects, ulnar parametacarpal flap

Procedia PDF Downloads 58
2 Characteristics and Challenges of Post-Burn Contractures in Adults and Children: A Descriptive Study

Authors: Hardisiswo Soedjana, Inne Caroline

Abstract:

Deep dermal or full thickness burns are inevitably lead to post-burn contractures. These contractures remain to be one of the most concerning late complications of burn injuries. Surgical management includes releasing the contracture followed by resurfacing the defect accompanied by post-operative rehabilitation. Optimal treatment of post-burn contractures depends on the characteristics of the contractures. This study is aimed to describe clinical characteristics, problems, and management of post-burn contractures in adults and children. A retrospective analysis was conducted from medical records of patients suffered from contractures after burn injuries admitted to Hasan Sadikin general hospital between January 2016 and January 2018. A total of 50 patients with post burn contractures were included in the study. There were 17 adults and 33 children. Most patients were male, whose age range within 15-59 years old and 5-9 years old. Educational background was mostly senior high school among adults, while there was only one third of children who have entered school. Etiology of burns was predominantly flame in adults (82.3%); whereas flame and scald were the leading cause of burn injury in children (11%). Based on anatomical regions, hands were the most common affected both in adults (35.2%) and children (48.5%). Contractures were identified in 6-12 months since the initial burns. Most post-burn hand contractures were resurfaced with full-thickness skin graft (FTSG) both in adults and children. There were 11 patients who presented with recurrent contracture after previous history of contracture release. Post-operative rehabilitation was conducted for all patients; however, it is important to highlight that it is still challenging to control splinting and exercise when patients are discharged and especially the compliance in children. In order to improve quality of life in patients with history of deep burn injuries, prevention of contractures should begin right after acute care has been established. Education for the importance of splinting and exercise should be administered as comprehensible as possible for adult patients and parents of pediatric patients.

Keywords: burn, contracture, education, exercise, splinting

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1 Resurgence of Influenza A (H1N1) Pdm09 during November 2015 - February 2016, Pakistan

Authors: Nazish Badar

Abstract:

Background: To investigate the epidemic resurgent wave of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infections during 2015-16 Influenza season(Nov,15 –Feb,16) we compared epidemiological features of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 associated hospitalizations and deaths during this period in Pakistan. Methods: Respiratory samples were tested using CDC Real-Time RT-PCR protocols. Demographic and epidemiological data was analyzed using SPSS. Risk ratio was calculated between age groups to compare patients that were hospitalized and died due to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 during this period. Results: A total of 1970 specimens were analyzed; influenza virus was detected in 494(25%) samples, including 458(93%) Influenza type A and 36(7%) influenza type B viruses. Amongst influenza A viruses, 351(77%) A(H1N1) pdm09 and 107(23%) were A/H3N2. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 peaked in January 2016 when 250(54%) of tested patients were positive. The resurgent waves increased hospitalizations due to pdmH1N1 as compared to the rest part of the year. Overall 267(76%) A(H1N1) pdm09 cases were hospitalized. Adults ≥18 years showed the highest relative risk of hospitalization (1.2). Median interval of hospitalization and symptom onset was five days for all age groups. During this period, a total of 34 laboratory-confirmed deaths associated with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) were reported out of 1970 cases, the case fatality rate was 1.72%. the male to female ratio was 2:1in reported deaths. The majority of the deaths during that period occurred in adults ≥18 years of age. Overall median age of the death cases was 42.8 years with underlying medical conditions. The median number of days between symptom onset was two days. The diagnosis upon admission in influenza-associated fatal cases was pneumonia (53%). Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 9 (26%), eight out of which (88%) required mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: The present resurgence of pandemic virus cannot be attributed to a single factor. The prolong cold and dry weather, possibility of drift in virus and absence of annual flu vaccination may have played an integrated role in resurfacing of pandemic virus.

Keywords: influenza A (H1N1)pdm 09, resurgence, epidemiology, Pakistan

Procedia PDF Downloads 135