Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: Trypanosomiasis

3 Hemato-Biochemical Studies on Naturally Infected Camels with Trypanosomiasis

Authors: Khalid Mehmood, Riaz Hussain, Rao Z. Abbas, Tariq Abbas, Abdul Ghaffar, Ahmad J. Sabir

Abstract:

Blood born diseases such as trypanosomiasis have negative impacts on health, production and working efficiency of camels in different camel-rearing areas of the world including Pakistan. In present study blood samples were collected from camels kept at the desert condition of cholistan to estimate the prevalence of trypanosomiasis and hemato-biochemical changes in naturally infected cases. Results showed an overall 9.31% prevalence of trypanosomiasis in camels. Various clinical signs such as pyrexia, occasional shivering, inappetence, urticaria, swelling, lethargy, going down in condition and edema of pads were observed in few cases. The statistical analysis did not show significant association of age and sex with trypanosomiasis. However, results revealed significantly decreased values of total erythrocyte counts, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, serum total proteins and albumin while increased values of mean corpuscular volume was recorded in infected animals as compared to healthy. A significant (P<0.01) increased values of total leukocyte count, monocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophils, and eosinophils was recorded in infected animals. Moreover, microscopic examination of blood films obtained from naturally infected cases showed the presence of parasite and various morphological changes in cells such as stomatocyte, hyperchromasia, and polychromasia. Significantly increased values of different hepatic enzymes including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were also recorded.

Keywords: camel, hematological indices, serum enzymes, Trypanosomiasis

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2 Targeting Trypanosoma brucei Using Antibody Drug Conjugates against the Transferrin Receptor

Authors: Camilla Trevor, Matthew K. Higgins, Andrea Gonzalez-Munoz, Mark Carrington

Abstract:

Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease affecting both humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa. The diseases are caused by infection with African trypanosomes, protozoa transmitted by tsetse flies. Treatment currently relies on the use of chemotherapeutics with ghastly side effects. Here, we describe the development of effective antibody-drug conjugates that target the T. brucei transferrin receptor. The receptor is essential for trypanosome growth in a mammalian host but there are approximately 12 variants of the transferrin receptor in the genome. Two of the most divergent variants were used to generate recombinant monoclonal immunoglobulin G using phage display and we identified cross-reactive antibodies that bind both variants using phage ELISA, fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays and surface plasmon resonance. Fluorescent antibodies were used to demonstrate uptake into trypanosomes in culture. Toxin-conjugated antibodies were effective at killing trypanosomes at sub-nanomolar concentrations. The approach of using antibody-drug conjugates has proven highly effective.

Keywords: antibody-drug conjugates, phage display, transferrin receptor, trypanosomes

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1 Multi-Sectoral Prioritization of Zoonotic Diseases in Uganda, 2017: The Perspective of One Health Experts

Authors: Musa Sekamatte

Abstract:

Background: Zoonotic diseases continue to be a public health burden in countries around the world. Uganda is especially vulnerable due to its location, biodiversity, and population. Given these concerns, the Ugandan government in collaboration with the Global Health Security Agenda conducted a zoonotic disease prioritization workshop to identify zoonotic diseases of concern to multiple Ugandan ministries. Materials and Methods: The One Health Zoonotic Disease Prioritization tool, developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), was used for prioritization of zoonotic diseases in Uganda. Workshop participants included voting members representing human, animal, and environmental health ministries as well as key partners who observed the workshop. Over 100 articles describing characteristics of these zoonotic diseases were reviewed for the workshop. During the workshop, criteria for prioritization were selected, and questions and weights relevant to each criterion were determined. Next steps for multi-sectoral engagement for the prioritized zoonoses were then discussed. Results: 48 zoonotic diseases were considered during the workshop. Criteria selected to prioritize zoonotic diseases in order of importance were (1) severity of disease in humans in Uganda, (2) availability of effective control strategies, (3) potential to cause an epidemic or pandemic in humans or animals, (4) social and economic impacts, and (5) bioterrorism potential. Seven zoonotic diseases were identified as priorities for Uganda: anthrax, zoonotic influenza viruses, viral hemorrhagic fevers, brucellosis, African trypanosomiasis, plague, and rabies. Discussion: One Health approaches and multi-sectoral collaborations are crucial in the surveillance, prevention, and control strategies for zoonotic diseases. Uganda used such an approach to identify zoonotic diseases of national concern. Identifying these priority diseases enables the National One Health Platform and the Zoonotic Disease Coordinating Office to address the diseases in the future.

Keywords: national one health platform, zoonotic diseases, multi-sectoral, severity

Procedia PDF Downloads 62