Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 8

Search results for: Jasmin Chantah

8 A Randomized Controlled Intervention Study of the Effect of Music Training on Mathematical and Working Memory Performances

Authors: Ingo Roden, Stefana Lupu, Mara Krone, Jasmin Chantah, Gunter Kreutz, Stephan Bongard, Dietmar Grube

Abstract:

The present experimental study examined the effects of music and math training on mathematical skills and visuospatial working memory capacity in kindergarten children. For this purpose, N = 54 children (mean age: 5.46 years; SD = .29) were randomly assigned to three groups. Children in the music group (n = 18) received weekly sessions of 60 min music training over a period of eight weeks, whereas children in the math group (n = 18) received the same amount of training focusing on mathematical basic skills, such as numeracy skills, quantity comparison, and counting objectives. The third group of children (n = 18) served as waiting controls. The groups were matched for sex, age, IQ and previous music experiences at baseline. Pre-Post intervention measurements revealed a significant interaction effect of group x time, showing that children in both music and math groups significantly improved their early numeracy skills, whereas children in the control group did not. No significant differences between groups were observed for the visuospatial working memory performances. These results confirm and extend previous findings on transfer effects of music training on mathematical abilities and visuospatial working memory capacity. They show that music and math interventions are similarly effective to enhance children’s mathematical skills. More research is necessary to establish, whether cognitive transfer effects arising from music interventions might facilitate children’s transition from kindergarten to first-grade.

Keywords: music training, mathematical skills, working memory, transfer

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7 Effects of Music Training on Social-Emotional Development and Basic Musical Skills: Findings from a Longitudinal Study with German and Migrant Children

Authors: Stefana Francisca Lupu, Jasmin Chantah, Mara Krone, Ingo Roden, Stephan Bongard, Gunter Kreutz

Abstract:

Long-term music interventions could enhance both musical and nonmusical skills. The present study was designed to explore cognitive, socio-emotional, and musical development in a longitudinal setting. Third-graders (N = 184: 87 male, 97 female; mean age = 8.61 years; 115 native German and 69 migrant children) were randomly assigned to two intervention groups (music and maths) and a control group over a period of one school-year. At baseline, children in these groups were similar in basic cognitive skills, with a trend of advantage in the control group. Dependent measures included the culture fair intelligence test CFT 20-R; the questionnaire of emotional and social school experience for grade 3 and 4 (FEESS 3-4), the test of resources in childhood and adolescence (FRKJ 8-16), the test of language proficiency for German native and non-native primary school children (SFD 3), the reading comprehension test (ELFE 1-6), the German math test (DEMAT 3+) and the intermediate measures of music audiation (IMMA). Data were collected two times at the beginning (T1) and at the end of the school year (T2). A third measurement (T3) followed after a six months retention period. Data from baseline and post-intervention measurements are currently being analyzed. Preliminary results of all three measurements will be presented at the conference.

Keywords: musical training, primary-school German and migrant children, socio-emotional skills, transfer

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6 Disability Representation in Children’s Programs: A Critical Analysis of Nickelodeon’s Avatar

Authors: Jasmin Glock

Abstract:

Media plays a significant role in terms of shaping and influencing people’s perception of various themes, including disability. Although recent examples indicate progressive attitudes in society, programs across genres continue to portray disability in a negative and stereotypical way. Such a one-sided or stereotypical portrayal of disabled people can further reinforce their marginalized position by turning them into the other. The common trope of the blind or visually impaired woman, for example, marks the character as particularly vulnerable. These stereotypes are easily absorbed and left unquestioned, especially by younger audiences. As a result, the presentation of disability as problematic or painful can instill a subconscious fear of disability in viewers at a very young age. Now the question arises, how can disability be portrayed to children in a more positive way? This paper focuses on the portrayal of physical disability in children’s programming. Using disabled characters from Nickelodeon’s Avatar: The Last Airbender and Avatar: The Legend of Korra, the paper will show that the chosen animated characters have the potential to challenge and subvert disability-based bias and to contribute to the normalization of disability on screen. Analyzing blind protagonist Toph Beifong, recurring support character and wheelchair user Teo, and villain Ming Hua who has prosthetic limbs, this paper aims at highlighting that these disabled characters are far more than mere stereotyped tokens. Instead, they are crucial to the outcome of the story. They are strong and confident while still being allowed to express their insecurities in certain situations. The paper also focuses on how these characters can make disability issues relatable to disabled and non-disabled young audiences alike and how they can thereby contribute to the reduction of prejudice. Finally, they will serve as an example of what inclusive, nuanced, and even empowering disability representation in animated television series can look like.

Keywords: Children, disability, representation, television

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5 Use of Giant Magneto Resistance Sensors to Detect Micron to Submicron Biologic Objects

Authors: Manon Giraud, Francois-Damien Delapierre, Guenaelle Jasmin-Lebras, Cecile Feraudet-Tarisse, Stephanie Simon, Claude Fermon

Abstract:

Early diagnosis or detection of harmful substances at low level is a growing field of high interest. The ideal test should be cheap, easy to use, quick, reliable, specific, and with very low detection limit. Combining the high specificity of antibodies-functionalized magnetic beads used to immune-capture biologic objects and the high sensitivity of a GMR-based sensors, it is possible to even detect these biologic objects one by one, such as a cancerous cell, a bacteria or a disease biomarker. The simplicity of the detection process makes its use possible even for untrained staff. Giant Magneto Resistance (GMR) is a recently discovered effect consisting in the electrical resistance modification of some conductive layers when exposed to a magnetic field. This effect allows the detection of very low variations of magnetic field (typically a few tens of nanoTesla). Magnetic nanobeads coated with antibodies targeting the analytes are mixed with a biological sample (blood, saliva) and incubated for 45 min. Then the mixture is injected in a very simple microfluidic chip and circulates above a GMR sensor that detects changes in the surrounding magnetic field. Magnetic particles do not create a field sufficient to be detected. Therefore, only the biological objects surrounded by several antibodies-functionalized magnetic beads (that have been captured by the complementary antigens) are detected when they move above the sensor. Proof of concept has been carried out on NS1 mouse cancerous cells diluted in PBS which have been bonded to magnetic 200nm particles. Signals were detected in cells-containing samples while none were recorded for negative controls. Binary response was hence assessed for this first biological model. The precise quantification of the analytes and its detection in highly diluted solution is the step now in progress.

Keywords: early diagnosis, giant magnetoresistance, lab-on-a-chip, submicron particle

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4 The Rupture of Tendon Achilles During the Recreative and Sports Activities

Authors: Jasmin S. Nurkovic, Ljubisa Dj. Jovasevic, Zana C. Dolicanin, Zoran S. Bajin

Abstract:

Ruptured muscles and tendons very often must be repatriated by open operation in young persons. In young, muscles are ruptured more often than tendons, at the sane time in older persons are more exposed to rupture than muscles. Ruptured of the calcaneus are the most present of all ruptures. Sometime the rupture is complete, but very often the incomplete rupture can be noticed. During six years, from 2006 to 2012, we treated nineteen male patients and three female patients with the rupture of tendon Achilles. The youngest patient was aged thirty two, and the oldest was also managed sixty four. The youngest female patient was forty one and the oldest was forty six. One of our patients who was under corticosteroid treatment did not take any part in sport activities but she was, as she told us, going for a long walk, the same was with other two patients one man and one woman. We had nineteen male patients age 32 to 64 and three female patients age 41, 44 and 46. Conservative treatment by cast was applied in five patients and very good results were in three of them. In two patients surgical treatment failed in patient’s age 53 and 64. Only one of all patients treated by surgery had healing problems because of necrotic changes of the skin where incision was made. One of our female patients age 45 was under steroid treatment for almost 20 years because of asthmatic problems. We suggested her wearing boots with 8cm long heels by day and by night eight weeks. The final results were satisfactory and all the time she was able to work and to walk. It was the only case we had with bilateral tendon rupture. After eight weeks the cast is removed and psychiatric treatment started, patient is using crutches with partial weight bearing over a period of two weeks. Quite the same treatment conservative treatment, only the cast is not removed after two but after four weeks. Everyday activities after the surgical treatment started ten weeks and sport activities can start after fourteen to sixteen weeks. An increased activity of our patient without previous preparing for forces activity can result, as we already see, with tendon rupture. Treatment is very long and very often surgical. We find that surgical treatment resulted as safer and better solution for patients. We also had a patient with spontaneous rupture of tendon during longer walking but this patient was under prolonged corticosteroid treatment.

Keywords: tendon, Achilles, rupture, sport

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3 Envisioning The Future of Language Learning: Virtual Reality, Mobile Learning and Computer-Assisted Language Learning

Authors: Jasmin Cowin, Amany Alkhayat

Abstract:

This paper will concentrate on a comparative analysis of both the advantages and limitations of using digital learning resources (DLRs). DLRs covered will be Virtual Reality (VR), Mobile Learning (M-learning) and Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) together with their subset, Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) in language education. In addition, best practices for language teaching and the application of established language teaching methodologies such as Communicative Language Teaching (CLT), the audio-lingual method, or community language learning will be explored. Education has changed dramatically since the eruption of the pandemic. Traditional face-to-face education was disrupted on a global scale. The rise of distance learning brought new digital tools to the forefront, especially web conferencing tools, digital storytelling apps, test authoring tools, and VR platforms. Language educators raced to vet, learn, and implement multiple technology resources suited for language acquisition. Yet, questions remain on how to harness new technologies, digital tools, and their ubiquitous availability while using established methods and methodologies in language learning paired with best teaching practices. In M-learning language, learners employ portable computing devices such as smartphones or tablets. CALL is a language teaching approach using computers and other technologies through presenting, reinforcing, and assessing language materials to be learned or to create environments where teachers and learners can meaningfully interact. In VR, a computer-generated simulation enables learner interaction with a 3D environment via screen, smartphone, or a head mounted display. Research supports that VR for language learning is effective in terms of exploration, communication, engagement, and motivation. Students are able to relate through role play activities, interact with 3D objects and activities such as field trips. VR lends itself to group language exercises in the classroom with target language practice in an immersive, virtual environment. Students, teachers, schools, language institutes, and institutions benefit from specialized support to help them acquire second language proficiency and content knowledge that builds on their cultural and linguistic assets. Through the purposeful application of different language methodologies and teaching approaches, language learners can not only make cultural and linguistic connections in DLRs but also practice grammar drills, play memory games or flourish in authentic settings.

Keywords: language teaching methodologies, computer-assisted language learning, mobile learning, virtual reality

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2 Beyond Black Friday: The Value of Collaborative Research on Seasonal Shopping Events and Behavior

Authors: Jasmin H. Kwon , Thomas M. Brinthaupt

Abstract:

There is a general lack of consumer behavior research on seasonal shopping events. Studying these kinds of events is interesting and important for several reasons. First, global shopping opportunities have implications for cross-cultural shopping events and effects on seasonal events in other countries. Second, seasonal shopping events are subject to economic conditions and may wane in popularity, especially with e-commerce options. Third, retailers can expand the success of their seasonal shopping events by taking advantage of cross-cultural opportunities. Fourth, it is interesting to consider how consumers from other countries might take advantage of different countries’ seasonal shopping events. Many countries have seasonal shopping events such as Black Friday. Research on these kinds of events can lead to the identification of cross-cultural similarities and differences in consumer behavior. We compared shopping motivations of college students who did (n=36) and did not (n=81) shop on Cyber Monday. The results showed that the groups did not differ significantly on any of the shopping motivation subscales. The Cyber Monday shoppers reported being significantly more likely to agree than disagree that their online shopping experience was enjoyable and exciting. They were more likely to disagree than agree that their experience was overwhelming. In addition, they agreed that they shopped only for deals, purchased the exact items they wanted, and thought that their efforts were worth it. Finally, they intended to shop again at next year’s Cyber Monday. It appears that there are many positive aspects to online seasonal shopping, independent of one’s typical shopping motivations. Different countries have seasonal events similar to the Black Friday and Cyber Monday shopping holiday (e.g., Boxing Day, Fukubukuro, China’s Singles Day). In Korea, there is increasing interest in taking advantage of U.S. Black Friday and Cyber Monday opportunities. Government officials are interested in adapting the U.S. holiday to Korean retailers, essentially recreating the Black Friday/Cyber Monday holiday there. Similarly, the Japanese Fukubukuro ('Lucky Bag') holiday is being adapted by other countries such as Korea and the U.S. International shipping support companies are also emerging that help customers to identify and receive products from other countries. U.S. department stores also provide free shipping on international orders for certain items. As these structural changes are occurring and new options for global shopping emerge, the need to understand the role of shoppers’ motivations becomes even more important. For example, the Cyber Monday results are particularly relevant to the new landscape with e-commerce and cross-cultural opportunities, since many of these events involve e-commerce. Within today’s global market, physical location of a retail store is no longer a limitation to growing one’s market share. From a consumer perspective, it is important to investigate how shopping motivations are related to e-commerce seasonal events. From a retail perspective, understanding the shopping motivations of international customers would help retailers to expand and better tailor their seasonal shopping events beyond the boundaries of their own countries. From a collaborative perspective, research on this topic can include interdisciplinary researchers, including those from fashion merchandising, marketing, retailing, and psychology.

Keywords: Black Friday, cross-cultural research, Cyber Monday, seasonal shopping behavior

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1 Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and 21st Century Education

Authors: Jasmin Cowin

Abstract:

The future of education is reimagined and redesigned through new technologies and ways of interpreting the world. This reshaping of educational philosophies and their underpinning pedagogies transforms the modes of delivery in educational institutions worldwide. This paper explores new augmented reality digital technologies (ARDTs) and their use cases in reimagining education during the artificial intelligence (AI) age. The future of education and work will be a fluid panorama with no job or career guaranteed in a VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity) environment. Structuring education as a menu of predefined disciplines and degrees in brick-and-mortar educational institutions may no longer be an optimal model. The convergence of three areas: ARDTs, big data and global demand of a highly qualified teacher workforce have far-reaching consequences in the field of education, raising fundamental questions about the nature of education and educators: what is taught, by whom it is taught, how it is taught, and where is it taught. The transformative way knowledge is generated, disseminated, and transformed into products and services comes on top of recent transformations in business processes enabled by data aggregation and networks. Learning centers are being transformed by computer-based intelligent systems. Algorithmic approaches to decision making are starting to permeate both institutional and personal spheres through decision support systems. In education, artificial intelligence (AI) and intelligent systems will become change agents with deep impacts not only on assessment, administrative functions, organizational strategic planning, student acquisition, and retention but also on curriculum design, personal learning networks (PNL), and the global competitiveness of educational institutions and their graduates. Keywords and changing terminology, such as Fourth Industrial Revolution, artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, Augmented Reality Digital Technologies, terminal automation, nanomaterials, educational transformation, frameworks, and emerging trends for a 21st-century education, globalization, Blockchain, Holochain, deep learning, personalized learning, machine learning, and gamification are indicators of a changing dialogue within the education landscape and among its professionals. Areas in which AI is already entwined in education include smart content, intelligent tutoring systems, virtual facilitators, ARDTs, and yet-to-be-invented learning environments with the distinct possibility of blockchain or Holochain integration for administrative organizational purposes. Blockchain or Holochain integration has the potential to disrupt through the automatic recognition and transfer of credits, the tracking of intellectual property, the use of verified sovereign identities for student identification, and immutable certificates/micro-credentials. In conclusion, ARDTs have the potential to foster learning through simulations, digital kiosks, live virtual events, live interactivity, instructor-facilitated learning, AI-driven chatbots, and hyper-realistic experiences. However, there are yet-to-be-analyzed dangers around pervasive information capture, which is more than tracking a user’s browsing history. Ultimately, 21st-century ARDTs and computer-assisted learning present significant opportunities and challenges to educational institutions and learners alike.

Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT), Blockchain, educational transformation, Holochain, Internet of Things (IoT)

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