Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

Search results for: sulfasalazine

4 The Protective Effects of Naringenin on Iodoacetamide-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

Authors: Yomna T. Abdou, Hala F. Zaki, Sanaa A. Kenawy

Abstract:

Naringenin is a flavanone, a type of flavonoid, found in fruits such as grapefruit, oranges, and tomatoes, was found to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. The present study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of naringenin on iodoacetamide-induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with sulfasalazine (300 mg/kg, p.o.) as standard anti-inflammatory drug or naringenin (50 mg/kg, p.o.) for 7 consecutive days then UC was induced by intracolon administration of 0.1 ml (2%) iodoacetamide dissolved in 1% methylcelluose. One week later, animals were scarificed and the colonic tissues were dissected. Colon inflammation was evident by elevation in colon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme, prostaglandin- E2 (PG-E2) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. Additionally, oxidative stress was manifested by increased colon lipoperoxidation (MDA), glutathione (GSH) depletion, elevated nitric oxide (NO) content and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Pretreatment with naringenin largely mitigated these alterations. The present study reinforces the hypothetical use of naringenin as an anti-inflammatory complement to conventional UC treatment and could be considered in the dietary prevention of intestinal inflammation and related disorders.

Keywords: iodoacetamide, naringenin, sulfasalazine, ulcerative colitis

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3 Involvement of BCRP/ABCG2 in Protective Mechanisms of Resveratrol against Methotrexate-Induced Renal Damage in Rats

Authors: Mohamed A. Morsy, Azza A. El-Sheikh, Abdulla Y. Al-Taher

Abstract:

Resveratrol (RES) is a well-known polyphenol antioxidant. We have previously shown that testicular protective effect of RES against the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX)-induced toxicity involves transporter-mediated mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effect of RES on MTX-induced nephrotoxicity. Rats were administered RES (10 mg/kg/day) for 8 days, with or without a single MTX dose (20 mg/kg i.p.) at day 4 of the experiment. MTX induced nephrotoxicity evident by significantly increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine compared to control, as well as distortion of kidney microscopic structure. MTX also significantly increased renal nitric oxide level, with induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. MTX also significantly up-regulated fas ligand and caspase 3. Administering RES prior to MTX significantly improved kidney function and microscopic picture, as well as significantly decreased nitrosative and apoptotic markers compared to MTX alone. RES, but not MTX, caused significant increase in expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), an apical efflux renal transporter that participates in urinary elimination of both MTX and RES. Interestingly, concomitant MTX and RES caused further up-regulation of renal Bcrp compared to RES alone. Using Human BCRP ATPase assay, both RES and MTX exhibited dose-dependent increase in ATPase activity, with Km values of 0.52 ± 0.03 and 30.9 ± 4.2 µM, respectively. Furthermore, combined RES and MTX caused ATPase activity which was significantly less than maximum ATPase activity attained by the positive control; sulfasalazine (12.5 µM). In conclusion, RES exerted nephro-protection against MTX-induced toxicity through anti-nitrosative and anti-apoptotic effects, as well as via up-regulation of renal Bcrp.

Keywords: methotrexate, resveratrol, nephrotoxicity, breast cancer resistance protein

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2 Preliminary Assessment for Protective Effect of Rhodiola rosea in Chemically Induced Ulcerative Colitis

Authors: Santram Lodhi, Alok Pal Jain, Awesh K. Yadav, Gopal Rai

Abstract:

Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) is commonly known as golden root or rose root. It is a perennial herbaceous plant and most investigated species of the genus Rhodiola. Rhodiola rosea contains flavonoids, terpenoids, phenylpropanoid glycosides and phenylethanol derivatives in the roots of the plant. The objective of present study was to investigate the protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract from Rhodiola rosea roots in DSS induced colitis in mice. The ulcerative colitis was induced by DSS (3%, w/v) in mice and estimated weight loss and stool consistency. Various parameters including Colon length, spleen weights and ulcer index were also measured. The histological observations were observed by H&E staining. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract on various antioxidant parameter of rat colon such as tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), reduced GSH, SOD concentrations and lipid peroxidation were determined. Pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined by ELISA. In DSS induced group, mice body weight decreased gradually as compared to the control group. Redness and edema were observed in the colons intensely and scores representing inflammation in this group. The extract treated showed with tissue levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and MPO activity were significantly (p<0.05) increased. The mice treated with higher doses of hydroalcoholic extract (300 mg/kg) significantly reduced the activity compared with standard drug sulfasalazine (100 mg/kg. B.wt). Conclusion: Results of this study were suggested that the efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract, especially at the higher dose, was similar to that of standard drug, which concerned its potential application as a natural medicine for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

Keywords: phenylpropanoid, Rhodiola rosea, sulfasalazin, ulcerative colitis

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1 Spironolactone in Psoriatic Arthritis: Safety, Efficacy and Effect on Disease Activity

Authors: Ashit Syngle, Inderjit Verma, Pawan Krishan

Abstract:

Therapeutic approaches used previously relied on disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that had only partial clinical benefit and were associated with significant toxicity. Spironolactone, an oral aldosterone antagonist, suppresses inflammatory mediators. Clinical efficacy of spironolactone compared with placebo in patients with active psoriatic arthritis despite treatment with prior traditional DMARDs. In the 24-week, placebo-controlled study patients (n=31) were randomized to placebo and spironolactone (2 m/kg/day). Patients on background concurrent DMARDs continued stable doses (methotrexate, leflunomide, and/or sulfasalazine). Primary outcome measures were the assessment of disease activity measures i.e. 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and diseases activity in psoriatic arthritis (DAPSA) at week 24. The key secondary endpoint was change from baseline in Health Assessment Questionnaire–Disability Index (HAQ-DI) at week 24. Additional efficacy outcome measures at week 24 included improvements in the markers of inflammation (ESR and CRP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1. At week 24, spironolactone significantly reduced disease activity measure DAS-28 (p<0.001) and DAPSA (p=0.001) compared with placebo. Significant improvements in key secondary measures HAQ-DI (disability index) were evident with spironolactone (p=0.02) versus placebo. After week 24, there was significant reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines level TNF-α, IL-6 (p<0.01) as compared with placebo group. However, there was no significant improvement in IL-1 in both treatment and placebo groups. There were minor side effects which did not mandate stopping of spironolactone. No change in any biochemical profile was noted after spironolactone treatment. Spironolactone was effective in the treatment of PsA, improving disease activity, physical function and suppressing the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Spironolactone demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was well tolerated.

Keywords: spironolactone, inflammation, inflammatory cytokine, psoriatic arthritis

Procedia PDF Downloads 260