Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 6

Search results for: Louisa Beukes

6 Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts and Acetic Acid Bacteria in Alcoholic and Acetous Fermentations: Effect on Phenolic Acids of Kei-Apple (Dovyalis caffra L.) Vinegar

Authors: Phillip Minnaar, Neil Jolly, Louisa Beukes, Santiago Benito-Saez

Abstract:

Dovyalis caffra is a tree found on the African continent. Limited information exists on the effect of acetous fermentation on the phytochemicals of Kei-apple fruit. The phytochemical content of vinegars is derived from compounds present in the fruit the vinegar is made of. Kei-apple fruit juice was co-inoculated with Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to induce alcoholic fermentation (AF). Acetous fermentation followed AF, using an acetic acid bacteria consortium as an inoculant. Juice had the lowest pH and highest total acidity (TA). The wine had the highest pH and vinegars lowest TA. Total soluble solids and L-malic acid decreased during AF and acetous fermentation. Volatile acidity concentration was not different among vinegars. Gallic, syringic, caffeic, p-coumaric, and chlorogenic acids increased during acetous fermentation, whereas ferulic, sinapic, and protocatechuic acids decreased. Chlorogenic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid in both wines and vinegars. It is evident from this investigation that Kei-apple vinegar is a source of plant-derived phenolics, which evolved through fermentation. However, the AAB selection showed minimal performance with respect to VA production. Acetic acid bacteria selection for acetous fermentation should be reconsidered, and the reasons for the decrease of certain phenolic acids during acetous fermentation needs to be investigated.

Keywords: acetic acid bacteria, acetous fermentation, liquid chromatography, phenolic acids

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5 Effect of Alcoholic and Acetous Fermentations on Phenolic Acids of Kei-Apple (Dovyalis Caffra L.) Fruit

Authors: Neil Jolly, Louisa Beukes, Santiago Benito-SaEz

Abstract:

Kei-apple is a tree found on the African continent. Limited information exists on the effect of alcoholic and acetous fermentation on the phytochemicals. The fruit has increased L-malic, ascorbic, and phenolic acids. Juice was co-inoculated with Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to induce alcoholic fermentation and acetous fermentation using acetic acid bacteria. Saccharomyces cerevisiae+S. pombe wines and vinegars had highest pH. Total acidity, soluble solids and L-malic acid decreased during alcoholic and acetous fermentation with highest in S. cerevisiae wines and vinegars. Volatile acidity was highest in S. pombe vinegars but not different from S. cerevisiae and S. cerevisiae+S. pombe. Gallic acid was highest in S. pombe wines and vinegars. Syringic acid was highest in S. cerevisiae wines and vinegars. S. cerevisiae+S. pombe wines were highest in caffeic, p-coumaric and protocatechuic acids. Schizosaccharomyces pombe vinegars were highest in caffeic and p-coumaric acids. Ferulic and sinapic acids were highest in S. pombe and S. cerevisiae wines, respectively. Chlorogenic acid was most abundant in both wines and vinegars. Saccharomyces cerevisiae+S. pombe and S. cerevisiae had a positive effect on most phenolic acids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae +acetic acid bacteria had an increased effect on syringic and chlorogenic acids. Schizosaccharomyces pombe+acetic acid bacteria resulted in an increase in gallic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids. Acetic acid bacteria had minimal performance with respect to volatile acidity production in comparison to commercial vinegars. Acetic acid bacteria selection should therefore be reconsidered and the decrease of certain phenolic acids during acetous fermentation needs to be investigated.

Keywords: acetic acid bacteria, liquid chromatography, phenolics, saccharomyces cerevisiae, schizosaccharomyces pombe

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4 Efficacy of Music for Improving Language in Children with Special Needs

Authors: Louisa Han Lin Tan, Poh Sim Kang, Wei Ming Loi, Susan Jane Rickard Liow

Abstract:

The efficacy of music for improving speech and language has been shown across ages and diagnoses. Across the world, the wide range of therapy settings and increasing number of children diagnosed with special needs demand more cost and time effective service delivery. However, research exploring co-treatment models on children other than those with Autism Spectrum Disorder remains sparse. The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of music for improving language in children with special needs, and generalizability of therapy effects. 25 children (7 to 12 years) were split into three groups – A, B and control. A cross-over design with direct therapy (storytelling) with or without music, and indirect therapy was applied with two therapy phases lasting 6 sessions each. Therapy targeted three prepositions in each phase. Baseline language abilities were assessed, with re-assessment after each phase. The introduction of music in therapy led to significantly greater improvement (p=.046, r=.53) in associated language abilities, with case studies showing greater effectiveness in developmentally appropriate target prepositions. However, improvements were not maintained once direct therapy ceased. As such, the incorporation of music could lead to greater efficiency and effectiveness of language therapy in children with special needs, but sustainability and generalizability of therapy effects both require further exploration.

Keywords: music, language therapy, children, special needs

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3 Exploring Gaming-Learning Interaction in MMOG Using Data Mining Methods

Authors: Meng-Tzu Cheng, Louisa Rosenheck, Chen-Yen Lin, Eric Klopfer

Abstract:

The purpose of the research is to explore some of the ways in which gameplay data can be analyzed to yield results that feedback into the learning ecosystem. Back-end data for all users as they played an MMOG, The Radix Endeavor, was collected, and this study reports the analyses on a specific genetics quest by using the data mining techniques, including the decision tree method. In the study, different reasons for quest failure between participants who eventually succeeded and who never succeeded were revealed. Regarding the in-game tools use, trait examiner was a key tool in the quest completion process. Subsequently, the results of decision tree showed that a lack of trait examiner usage can be made up with additional Punnett square uses, displaying multiple pathways to success in this quest. The methods of analysis used in this study and the resulting usage patterns indicate some useful ways that gameplay data can provide insights in two main areas. The first is for game designers to know how players are interacting with and learning from their game. The second is for players themselves as well as their teachers to get information on how they are progressing through the game, and to provide help they may need based on strategies and misconceptions identified in the data.

Keywords: MMOG, decision tree, genetics, gaming-learning interaction

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2 The Art of Looking (Back): The Female Gaze in Portrait de la Jeune Fille en Feu and Little Women

Authors: Louisa Browne Kirk

Abstract:

In recent press interviews to promote Portrait de la jeune fille en feu (2019, translated to Portrait of a Lady on Fire in English), director and screenwriter Céline Sciamma and actors Adèle Haenel and Noémie Merlant repeatedly state that they understand the film as (if not uniquely, then unusually) produced via and supportive of ‘the female gaze’. Such a way of seeing stands in opposition to ‘the male gaze’, first theorised by Laura Mulvey as the way in which the female figure is a bearer, not maker, of meaning, a silent signifier through and against whom the male creator/viewer produces his fantasies and obsessions. What, then, is the female gaze? How does a woman produce meaning in and through film? Portrait de la jeune fille en feu and another very recent film, Little Women (2019, directed by Greta Gerwig), are unlikely companion films that understand the female gaze to be the act of one woman looking at another woman, a looking that is mediated through the production of art. In Sciamma’s film this looking is sexual and mediated through painting and in Gerwig’s film looking is familial and mediated through writing. In the schema of these films, art, love, looking and meaning are produced through collaboration. The painted and the painter, the written and the writer, are no longer rendered as subject and object but as dual creators, both always seeing and seen. The gaze of the cinematic woman, mediated through shared artistic practice, is ‘the desire-that-gives’.

Keywords: female gaze, Gerwig, Sciamma, shared artistic practice

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1 Radical Technological Innovation - Comparison of a Critical Success Factors Framework with Existing Literature

Authors: Florian Wohlfeil, Orestis Terzidis, Louisa Hellmann

Abstract:

Radical technological innovations enable companies to reach strong market positions and are thus desirable. On the other hand, the innovation process is related to significant costs and risks. Hence, the knowledge of the factors that influence success is crucial for technology driven companies. In a previous study, we have developed a conceptual framework of 25 Critical Success Factors for radical technological innovations and mapped them to four main categories: Technology, Organization, Market, and Process. We refer to it as the Technology-Organization-Market-Process (TOMP) framework. Taking the TOMP framework as a reference model, we conducted a structured and focused literature review of eleven standard books on the topic of radical technological innovation. With this approach, we aim to evaluate, expand, and clarify the set of Critical Success Factors detailed in the TOMP framework. Overall, the set of factors and their allocation to the main categories of the TOMP framework could be confirmed. However, the factor organizational home is not emphasized and discussed in most of the reviewed literature. On the other hand, an additional factor that has not been part of the TOMP framework is described to be important – strategy fit. Furthermore, the factors strategic alliances and platform strategy appear in the literature but in a different context compared to the reference model.

Keywords: Critical Success Factors, radical technological innovation, TOMP framework, innovation process

Procedia PDF Downloads 534