Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 5

Search results for: fermentability

5 Effect of Mineral Ion Addition on Yeast Performance during Very High Gravity Wort Fermentation

Authors: H. O. Udeh, T. E. Kgatla, A. I. O. Jideani

Abstract:

The effect of Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ on Saccharomyces pastorianus during very high gravity fermentation was evaluated in this study at independent and three variable combinations. Wort gravity of 21oP was prepared from barley malt, hops and water, to which the metal ions were supplemented in their combinations and subsequently pitched. After 96 h of fermentation, high wort fermentability (%F)= 29.53 was obtained in wort medium containing 900:4 ppm Mg2+ + Ba2+. Increased ethanol titre 7.3491 %(v/v) and 7.1313 %(v/v) were obtained in media containing 900:4 ppm Mg2+ + Ba2+ and 12:900 ppm Zn2+ + Mg2+. Decrease %F= 22.54 and ethanol titre 6.1757% (v/v) was recorded in wort medium containing 12:4 ppm Zn2+ + Ba2+. In media containing the individual metal ions, increased %F= 27.94 and %F= 26.03 were obtained in media containing 700 ppm Mg2+ and 2 ppm Ba2+, with increased ethanol yield of 7.8844% (v/v) and 7.6245% (v/v) respectively. Least %F of 11.75 and 10.80, and ethanol titre of 4.99 (%v/v) and 4.80 (%v/v) were obtained for 10 ppm Zn2+ and 4 ppm Ba2+ respectively.

Keywords: ethanol yield, fermentability, mineral ions, yeast stress, very high gravity fermentation

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4 In vitro Fermentation Characteristics of Palm Oil Byproducts Which is Supplemented with Growth Factor Rumen Microbes

Authors: Mardiati Zain, Jurnida Rahman, Khasrad, Erpomen

Abstract:

The aim of this experiment was to study the use of palm oil by products (oil palm fronds (OPF), palm oil sludge (POS) and palm kernel cake (PKC)), that supplemented with growth factor rumen microbes (Sapindus rarak and Sacharomyces cerevisiae) on digestibility and fermentation in vitro. Oil Palm Fronds was previously treated with 3% urea. The treatments consist of 50% OPF+ 30% POS+ 20% PKC as a control diet (A), B = A + 4% Sapindus rarak, C = A + 0.5 % Sacharomyces cerevisiae and D = A + 4% Sapindus rarak + 0.5% Sacharomyces cerevisiae. Digestibility of DM, OM, ADF, NDF, cellulose and rumen parameters (NH3 and VFA) of all treatments were significantly different (P < 0.05). Fermentation and digestibility treatment A were significantly lower than treatments B, C, and D. The result indicated that supplementation Sapindus rarak and S. cerevisiae were able to improve fermentability and digestibility of palm oil by product.

Keywords: palm oil by product, Sapindus rarak, Sacharomyces rerevisiae, fermentability, OPF ammoniated

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3 Systematic Review of Dietary Fiber Characteristics Relevant to Appetite and Energy Intake Outcomes in Clinical Intervention Trials of Healthy Humans

Authors: K. S. Poutanen, P. Dussort, A. Erkner, S. Fiszman, K. Karnik, M. Kristensen, C. F. M. Marsaux, S. Miquel-Kergoat, S. Pentikäinen, P. Putz, R. E. Steinert, J. Slavin, D. J. Mela

Abstract:

Dietary fiber (DF) intake has been associated with lower body weight or less weight gain. These effects are generally attributed to putative effects of DF on appetite. Many intervention studies have tested the effect of DFs on appetite-related measures, with inconsistent results. However, DF includes a wide category of different compounds with diverse chemical and physical characteristics, and correspondingly diverse effects in human digestion. Thus, inconsistent results between DF consumption and appetite are not surprising. The specific contribution of different compounds with varying physico-chemical properties to appetite control and the mediating mechanisms are not well characterized. This systematic review aimed to assess the influence of specific DF characteristics, including viscosity, gel forming capacity, fermentability, and molecular weight, on appetite-related outcomes in healthy humans. Medline and FSTA databases were searched for controlled human intervention trials, testing the effects of well-characterized DFs on subjective satiety/appetite or energy intake outcomes. Studies were included only if they reported: 1) fiber name and origin, and 2) data on viscosity, gelling properties, fermentability, or molecular weight of the DF materials tested. The search generated 3001 unique records, 322 of which were selected for further consideration from title and abstract screening. Of these, 149 were excluded due to insufficient fiber characterization and 124 for other reasons (not original article, not randomized controlled trial, or no appetite related outcome), leaving 49 papers meeting all the inclusion criteria, most of which reported results from acute testing (<1 day). The eligible 49 papers described 90 comparisons of DFs in foods, beverages or supplements. DF-containing material of interest was efficacious for at least one appetite-related outcome in 51/90 comparisons. Gel-forming DF sources were most consistently efficacious but there were no clear associations between viscosity, MW or fermentability and appetite-related outcomes. A considerable number of papers had to be excluded from the review due to shortcomings in fiber characterization. To build understanding about the impact of DF on satiety/appetite specifically there should be clear hypotheses about the mechanisms behind the proposed beneficial effect of DF material on appetite, and sufficient data about the DF properties relevant for the hypothesized mechanisms to justify clinical testing. The hypothesized mechanisms should also guide the decision about relevant duration of exposure in studies, i.e. are the effects expected to occur during acute time frame (related to stomach emptying, digestion rate, etc.) or develop from sustained exposure (gut fermentation mediated mechanisms). More consistent measurement methods and reporting of fiber specifications and characterization are needed to establish reliable structure-function relationships for DF and health outcomes.

Keywords: appetite, dietary fiber, physico-chemical properties, satiety

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2 Ethanol and Biomass Production from Spent Sulfite Liquor by Filamentous Fungi

Authors: M. T. Asadollahzadeh, A. Ghasemian, A. R. Saraeian, H. Resalati, P. R. Lennartsson, M. J. Taherzadeh

Abstract:

Since filamentous fungi are capable of assimilating several types of sugars (hexoses and pentoses), they are potential candidates for bioconversion of spent sulfite liquor (SSL). Three filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus oryzae, Mucor indicus, and Rhizopus oryzae were investigated in this work. The SSL was diluted in order to obtain concentrations of 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% and supplemented with two types of nutrients. The results from cultivations in shake flask showed that A. oryzae and M. indicus were not able to grow in pure SSL and SSL90% while R. oryzae could grow only in SSL50% and SSL60%. Cultivation with A. oryzae resulted in the highest yield of produced fungal biomass, while R. oryzae cultivation resulted in the lowest fungal biomass yield. Although, the mediums containing yeast extract, (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, CaCl2∙2H2O, and MgSO4∙7H2O as nutrients supplementations produced higher fungal biomass compared to the mediums containing NH4H2PO4 and ammonia, but there was no significant difference between two types of nutrients in terms of sugars and acetic acid consumption rate. The sugars consumption in M. indicus cultivation was faster than A. oryzae and R. oryzae cultivation. Acetic acid present in SSL was completely consumed during cultivation of all fungi. M. indicus was the best and fastest ethanol producer from SSL among the fungi examined, when yeast extract and salts were used as nutrients supplementations. Furthermore, no further improvement in ethanol concentration and rate of sugars consumption was obtained in medium supplemented with NH4H2PO4 and ammonia compared to medium containing yeast extract, (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, CaCl2∙2H2O, and MgSO4∙7H2O. On the other hand, the higher dilution of SSL resulted in a better fermentability, and better consumption of sugars and acetic acid.

Keywords: ethanol, filamentous fungi, fungal biomass, spent sulfite liquor

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1 Inventory of Local Forages in Indonesia That Potentially Reduce Methane (CH4) Emissions and Increase Productivity in Ruminants

Authors: Amriana Hifizah, Philip Edward Vercoe, Graeme Bruce Martin, Teuku Reza Ferasy, Muhammad Hambal

Abstract:

Many native forage plant species have been used in Indonesia as feed for ruminants. However, less information is available about how these plants affect productivity, let alone methane emissions. In the province of Aceh, where the traditional practice is to feed local forages to small ruminants, the farmers are not satisfied with the productivity of their livestock, and they attribute this problem to poor availability and too few options for good quality forages. Forage quality is reduced by high environmental temperatures which increase the amount of lignification. In addition to reducing productivity, these factors also increase enteric methane production. A preliminary survey about potential forage species was completed in three different districts, two of low elevation and one of high elevation: Syiah Kuala (05°30’5.08” N to 095°24’7.35” E), elevation 29 m MSL; Kajhu (05°32’34.6” N to 095°21’17.7” E), elevation 30 m MSL; Lembah Seulawah (05°28'06.4" N to 095°43' 14.2" E), elevation 254 m MSL. Information about local plants was collected in a semi-structured interview with scientists, government field officers and local farmers, in the city of Banda Aceh and in those three districts. The outcome was a list 40 species that could be useful, of which 21 were selected for further study. The selection process was based on several criteria: high availability, high protein content, low toxicity, and evidence of secondary metabolites (eg, history of medicinal plants for both human and animals). For some of the selected medicinal plants, there is experimental evidence of effects on methane production during rumen fermentation. Subsequently, the selected forages were tested for their effects on rumen fermentation in vitro, using batch culture. The data produced will be used to identify forages with the potential to reduce CH4 emissions. These candidates will then be assessed for their benefits (fermentability and productivity) and potential deleterious side-effects.

Keywords: batch culture, forage, methane, rumen

Procedia PDF Downloads 237