Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: Panrapee Suttiwan

3 Relationships between Emotion Regulation Strategies and Well-Being Outcomes among the Elderly and Their Caregivers: A Dyadic Modeling Approach

Authors: Arunya Tuicomepee, Rewadee Watakakosol, Panrapee Suttiwan, Sakkaphat T. Ngamake, Sompoch Iamsupasit

Abstract:

Generally, 'positive' emotion regulation strategies such as cognitive reappraisal have linked to desirable outcomes while 'negative' strategies such as behavioral suppression have linked to undesirable outcomes. These trends have been found in both the elderly and professional practitioners. Hence, this study sought to investigate these trends further by examining the relationship between two dominant emotion regulation strategies in the literature (i.e., cognitive reappraisal and behavioral suppression) and well-being outcomes among the elderly (i.e., successful aging) and their caregivers (i.e., satisfaction with life), using the actor-partner interdependence model. A total of 150 elderly-caregiver dyads participated in the study. The elderly responded to two measures assessing the two emotion regulation strategies and successful aging while their caregivers responded to the same emotion regulation measure and a measure of satisfaction with life. Two criterion variables (i.e., successful aging and satisfaction with life) were specified as latent variables whereas four predictors (i.e., two strategies for the elderly and two strategies for their caregivers) were specified as observed variables in the model. Results have shown that, for the actor effect, the cognitive reappraisal strategy yielded positive relationships with the well-being outcomes for both the elderly and their caregivers. For the partner effect, a positive relationship between caregivers’ cognitive reappraisal strategy and the elderly’s successful aging was observed. The behavioral suppression strategy has not related to any well-being outcomes, within and across individual agents. This study has contributed to the literature by empirically showing that the mental activity of the elderly’s immediate environment such as their family members or close friends could affect their quality of life.

Keywords: Well-being, Older Adult, emotion regulation, caregiver

Procedia PDF Downloads 186
2 Predicting Intention and Readiness to Alcohol Consumption Reduction and Cessation among Thai Teenagers Using Scales Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

Authors: Arunya Tuicomepee, Rewadee Watakakosol, Panrapee Suttiwan, Sakkaphat T. Ngamake

Abstract:

Health problems caused by alcohol consumption not only have short-term effects at the time of drinking but also leave long-lasting health conditions. Teenagers who start drinking in their middle-high or high school years or before entering college have higher likelihood to increase their alcohol use and abuse, and they were found to be less healthy compared with their non-drinking peers when entering adulthood. This study aimed to examine factors that predict intention and readiness to reduce and quit alcohol consumption among Thai teenagers. Participants were 826 high-school and vocational school students, most of whom were females (64.4%) with the average age of 16.4 (SD = 0.9) and the average age of first drinking at 13.7 (SD = 2.2). Instruments included the scales that developed based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour theoretical framework. They were the Attitude toward Alcohol Reduction and Cessation Scale, Normative Group and Influence Scale, Perceived Behavioral Control toward Alcohol Reduction and Cessation Scale, Behavioral Intent toward Alcohol Reduction and Cessation Scale, and Readiness to Reduce and Quit Alcohol Consumption Scale. Findings revealed that readiness to reduce / quit alcohol was the most powerful predictive factor (β=. 53, p < .01), followed by attitude of easiness in alcohol reduction and cessation (β=.46, p < .01), perceived behavioral control toward alcohol reduction and cessation (β =.41, p < .01), normative group and influence (β=.15, p < .01), and attitude of being accepted from alcohol reduction and cessation (β = -.12, p < .01), respectively. Attitude of improved health after alcohol reduction and cessation did not show statistically significantly predictive power. All factors significantly predict teenagers’ alcohol reduction and cessation behavior and accounted for 59 percent of total variance of alcohol consumption reduction and cessation.

Keywords: intention, alcohol consumption reduction and cessation, readiness to change, Thai teenagers

Procedia PDF Downloads 187
1 Salient Beliefs regarding Alcohol Reduction and Cessation among Thai Teenagers

Authors: Panrapee Suttiwan, Sakkaphat T. Ngamake, Rewadee Watakakosol Arunya Tuicomepee

Abstract:

Alcohol consumption ranks among the top six of health-risk behaviors that lead to disability and death among Thai teenagers. Underage drinkers have higher health risks than their non-drinking peers do. This study, therefore, aimed to explore salient beliefs of Thai teenagers with alcohol reduction and cessation based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour theoretical framework. Participants were 225 high-school and vocational school students, most of whom (60.9%) consumed alcohol almost daily (5-6 times / week), and one-third of whom (33.8%) reported habitual moderate drink. The average age was 16.5 (SD = 0.9), and the average age of the first use of alcohol was 13.7 (SD = 2.2). Instrument was an open-ended questionnaire that elicited beliefs about having alcohol reduction / cessation in the past 12 months. Findings revealed salient benefit beliefs of alcohol reduction / cessation among the teens such as improved physical and mental health, accident and violence avoidance, less sexual risks, money and time saving, better academic performance, and improved relationships. In contrast, the teens identified several disadvantage beliefs such as deteriorating health, social awkwardness, lack of little fun, excitement, and experience, physical uneasiness, stress, and lack of self-confidence. Salient normative groups for alcohol reduction / cessation included parents, elder relatives, siblings, close friends, teachers, boy / girlfriends, and seniors / juniors at school. Situations influencing alcohol reduction / cessation included quarrels with boy / girlfriends, family conflicts, peer pressure, partying and socializing, festive holidays and anniversary celebration, and visiting entertainment places, etc. This study provides empirical evidence that help to identify normative attitudes towards alcohol reduction / cessation and may thus be an important knowledge for public health campaigns seeking to reduce alcohol consumption in this population.

Keywords: cessation, Thai teenagers, alcohol consumption reduction, salient belief

Procedia PDF Downloads 147