Commenced in January 2007
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The Neglected Elements of Implementing Strategic Succession Management in Public Organizations

Authors: Fran├žois Chiocchio, Mahshid Gharibpour

Abstract:

Regardless of the extent to which succession management is implemented in the private sector, it is still overlooked in the public sector. Traditional succession management is evolving providing a better alignment between business strategies and HR strategies. Succession management brings sustainable effectiveness for succession programs through career path development, knowledge and skill transfer, job retention, as well as high-potential candidates’ empowerment for upcoming vacancies. By way of a systematic literature review, we bring into focus strategic succession management in public organizations and discuss best ways of implementation. 

Keywords: Succession management, strategic succession management, public organization, succession management model.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1131341

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