Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

Search results for: preeclampsia

2 Gamma Glutamyl Transferase and Lactate Dehydrogenase as Biochemical Markers of Severity of Preeclampsia

Authors: S. M. Munde, N. R. Hazari, A. P. Thorat, S. B. Gaikwad, V. S. Hatolkar

Abstract:

This study was conducted to examine the possible role of serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the prediction of severity of preeclampsia. The study group comprised of 40 preeclamptic cases (22 with mild and 18 with severe) and 40 healthy normotensive pregnant controls. Serum samples of all the cases were assayed for GGT and LDH. Demographic, hemodynamic and laboratory data as well as serum GGT and LDH levels were compared among the three groups.

The results indicated that severe preeclamptic cases had significantly increased levels of serum GGT and LDH. The symptoms in severe preeclamptic women were significantly increased in patients with GGT > 70 IU/L and LDH >800 IU/L. Elevated levels of serum GGT and LDH can be used as biochemical markers which reflects the severity of preeclampsia and useful for the management of preeclampsia to decrease maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

Keywords: Severe Preeclampsia, GGT, LDH.

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1 Clinical Comparative Study Comparing Efficacy of Intrathecal Fentanyl and Magnesium as an Adjuvant to Hyperbaric Bupivacaine in Mild Pre-Eclamptic Patients Undergoing Caesarean Section

Authors: Sanchita B. Sarma, M. P. Nath

Abstract:

Adequate analgesia following caesarean section decreases morbidity, hastens ambulation, improves patient outcome and facilitates care of the newborn. Intrathecal magnesium, an NMDA antagonist, has been shown to prolong analgesia without significant side effects in healthy parturients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic effect, postoperative analgesia, and adverse effects of magnesium or fentanyl given intrathecally with hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine in patients with mild preeclampsia undergoing caesarean section. Sixty women with mild preeclampsia undergoing elective caesarean section were included in a prospective, double blind, controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive spinal anesthesia with 2 mL 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 12.5 μg fentanyl (group F) or 0.1 ml of 50% magnesium sulphate (50 mg) (group M) with 0.15ml preservative free distilled water. Onset, duration and recovery of sensory and motor block, time to maximum sensory block, duration of spinal anaesthesia and postoperative analgesic requirements were studied. Statistical comparison was carried out using the Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests and Independent Student’s t-test where appropriate. The onset of both sensory and motor block was slower in the magnesium group. The duration of spinal anaesthesia (246 vs. 284) and motor block (186.3 vs. 210) were significantly longer in the magnesium group. Total analgesic top up requirement was less in group M. Hemodynamic parameters were similar in both the groups. Intrathecal magnesium caused minimal side effects. Since Fentanyl and other opioid congeners are not available throughout the country easily, magnesium with its easy availability and less side effect profile can be a cost effective alternative to fentanyl in managing pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) patients given along with Bupivacaine intrathecally in caesarean section.

Keywords: Analgesia, magnesium, preeclampsia, spinal anaesthesia.

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