Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: neurospheres

3 Effect of Papaverine on Neurospheres

Authors: Noura Shehab-Eldeen, Mohamed Elsherbeeny, Hossam Elmetwally, Mohamed Salama, Ahmed Lotfy, Mohamed Elgamal, Hussein Sheashaa, Mohamed Sobh

Abstract:

Mitochondrial toxins including papaverine may be implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim was to detect the effect of papaverine on the proliferation and viability of neural stem cells. Rat neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryos (E14) brains. The dispersed tissues were allowed to settle, then, The supernatant was centrifuged at 1,000 g for 5 min. The pellet was placed in Hank’s solution cultured as free-floating neurospheres Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM) and Hams F12 (3:1) supplemented with B27 (Invitrogen GmBH, Karlsruhe, Germany), 20 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF; Biosource, Karlsruhe, Germany), 20 ng/mL recombinant human fibroblast growth factor (rhFGF; R&D Systems, Wiesbaden-Nordenstadt, Germany), and penicillin and streptomycin (1:100; Invitrogen) at 37°C with 7.5% CO2 . Differentiation was initiated by growth factor withdrawal and plating onto a poly-d-lysine/ laminin matrix. The neurospheres were fed every 2-3 days by replacing 50% of the culture media with fresh media. The culture suspension was transferred to a dish containing 16 wells. The wells were divided as follows: 4 wells received no papaverine (control), 4 wells 1 u, 4 wells 5 u and 4 wells 10 u of papaverine solution. In the next 2 weeks, photography (0,4,5,11days) and viability test were done. The photographs were analysed. Results : papaverine didn't affect proliferation of neurospheres, while it affected viability compared to control , this was dose related. Conclusion: This indicates the harmful effect of papaverine suggesting it to be a candidate neurotoxin causing Parkinsonism.

Keywords: neurospheres, neural stem cells, papaverine, Parkinsonism

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2 Effect of Papaverine on Developmental Neurotoxicity: Neurosphere as in vitro Model

Authors: Mohammed Y. Elsherbeny, Mohamed Salama, Ahmed Lotfy, Hossam Fareed, Nora Mohammed

Abstract:

Background: Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) entails the toxic effects imparted by various chemicals on brain during the early childhood when human brains are vulnerable during this period. DNT study in vivo cannot determine the effect of the neurotoxins, as it is not applicable, so using the neurosphere cells of lab animals as an alternative is applicable and time saving. Methods: Cell culture: Rat neural progenitor cells were isolated from rat embryos’ brain. The cortices were aseptically dissected out and the tissues were triturated. The dispersed tissues were allowed to settle. The supernatant was then transferred to a fresh tube and centrifuged. The pellet was placed in Hank’s balanced salt solution and cultured as free-floating neurospheres in proliferation medium. Differentiation was initiated by growth factor withdrawal in differentiation medium and plating onto a poly-d-lysine/ laminin matrix. Chemical Exposure: Neurospheres were treated for 2 weeks with papaverine in proliferation medium. Proliferation analyses: Spheres were cultured. After 0, 4, 5, 11 and 14 days, sphere size was determined by software analyses (CellProfiler, version 2.1; Broad Institute). Diameter of each neurosphere was measured and exported to excel file further to statistical analysis. Viability test: Trypsin-EDTA solution was added to neurospheres to dissociate neurospheres into single cells suspension, then viability evaluated by the Trypan Blue exclusion test. Result: As regards proliferation analysis and percentage of viable cells of papaverin treated groups: There was no significant change in cells proliferation compared to control at 0, 4, 5, 11 and 14 days with concentrations 1, 5 and 10 µM of papaverine, but there is a significant change in cell viability compared to control after 1 week and 2 weeks with the same concentrations of papaverine. Conclusion: Papaverine has toxic effect on viability of neural cell, not on their proliferation, so it may produce focal neural lesions not growth morphological changes.

Keywords: developmental neurotoxicity, neurotoxin, papaverine, neuroshperes

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1 Epoxomicin Affects Proliferating Neural Progenitor Cells of Rat

Authors: Bahaa Eldin A. Fouda, Khaled N. Yossef, Mohamed Elhosseny, Ahmed Lotfy, Mohamed Salama, Mohamed Sobh

Abstract:

Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) entails the toxic effects imparted by various chemicals on the brain during the early childhood period. As human brains are vulnerable during this period, various chemicals would have their maximum effects on brains during early childhood. Some toxicants have been confirmed to induce developmental toxic effects on CNS e.g. lead, however; most of the agents cannot be identified with certainty due the defective nature of predictive toxicology models used. A novel alternative method that can overcome most of the limitations of conventional techniques is the use of 3D neurospheres system. This in-vitro system can recapitulate most of the changes during the period of brain development making it an ideal model for predicting neurotoxic effects. In the present study, we verified the possible DNT of epoxomicin which is a naturally occurring selective proteasome inhibitor with anti-inflammatory activity. Rat neural progenitor cells were isolated from rat embryos (E14) extracted from placental tissue. The cortices were aseptically dissected out from the brains of the fetuses and the tissues were triturated by repeated passage through a fire-polished constricted Pasteur pipette. The dispersed tissues were allowed to settle for 3 min. The supernatant was, then, transferred to a fresh tube and centrifuged at 1,000 g for 5 min. The pellet was placed in Hank’s balanced salt solution cultured as free-floating neurospheres in proliferation medium. Two doses of epoxomicin (1µM and 10µM) were used in cultured neuropsheres for a period of 14 days. For proliferation analysis, spheres were cultured in proliferation medium. After 0, 4, 5, 11, and 14 days, sphere size was determined by software analyses. The diameter of each neurosphere was measured and exported to excel file further to statistical analysis. For viability analysis, trypsin-EDTA solution were added to neurospheres for 3 min to dissociate them into single cells suspension, then viability evaluated by the Trypan Blue exclusion test. Epoxomicin was found to affect proliferation and viability of neuropsheres, these effects were positively correlated to doses and progress of time. This study confirms the DNT effects of epoxomicin on 3D neurospheres model. The effects on proliferation suggest possible gross morphologic changes while the decrease in viability propose possible focal lesion on exposure to epoxomicin during early childhood.

Keywords: neural progentor cells, epoxomicin, neurosphere, medical and health sciences

Procedia PDF Downloads 334