Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: gluconoacetobacter hansenii

3 Bacterial Cellulose: A New Generation Antimicrobial Wound Dressing Biomaterial

Authors: Bhavana V. Mohite, Satish V. Patil

Abstract:

Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative for plant cellulose (PC) that prevents global warming leads to preservation of nature. Although PC and BC have the same chemical structure, BC is superior with its properties like its size, purity, porosity, degree of polymerization, crystallinity and water holding capacity, thermal stability etc. On this background the present study focus production and applications of BC as antimicrobial wound dressing material. BC was produced by Gluconoacetobacter hansenii (strain NCIM 2529) under shaking condition and statistically enhanced upto 7.2 g/l from 3.0 g/l. BC was analyzed for its physico mechanical, structural and thermal characteristics. BC produced at shaking condition exhibits more suitable properties in support to its high performance applications. The potential of nano silver impregnated BC was determined for sustained release modern antimicrobial wound dressing material by swelling ratio, mechanical properties and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. BC in nanocomposite form with other synthetic polymer like PVA shows improvement in its properties such as swelling ratio (757% to 979%) and sustainable release of antibacterial agent. The high drug loading and release potential of BC was evidenced in support to its nature as antimicrobial wound dressing material. The nontoxic biocompatible nature of BC was confirmed by MTT assay on human epidermal cells with 90% cell viability that allows its application as a regenerative biomaterial. Thus, BC as a promising new generation antimicrobial wound dressing material was projected.

Keywords: agitated culture, biopolymer, gluconoacetobacter hansenii, nanocomposite

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2 Microbial Assessment of Fenugreek Paste during Storage and Antimicrobial Effect of Greek Clover, Trigonella foenum-graecum

Authors: Zerrin Erginkaya, Gözde Konuray

Abstract:

In this study, antimicrobial effect of Greek clover was determined with usage of MIC (minimum inhibition concentration) and agar diffusion method. Moreover, pH, water activity and microbial change were determined during storage of fenugreek paste. At first part of our study, microbial load of spices was evaluated. Two different fenugreek pastes were produced with mixing of Greek clover, spices, garlic and water. Fenugreek pastes were stored at 4 °C. At the second part, antimicrobial effect of Greek clover was determined on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Aspergillus parasiticus, Candida rugosa, Mucor spp., when the concentrations of Greek clover were 8%, 12% and 16%. According to the results obtained, mould growth was determined at 15th and 30th days of storage in first and second fenugreek samples, respectively. Greek clover showed only antifungal effect on Aspergillus parasiticus at previously mentioned concentrations.

Keywords: antimicrobial, fenugreek, Greek clover, minimum inhibition concentration

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1 Development of a Bioprocess Technology for the Production of Vibrio midae, a Probiotic for Use in Abalone Aquaculture

Authors: Ghaneshree Moonsamy, Nodumo N. Zulu, Rajesh Lalloo, Suren Singh, Santosh O. Ramchuran

Abstract:

The abalone industry of South Africa is under severe pressure due to illegal harvesting and poaching of this seafood delicacy. These abalones are harvested excessively; as a result, these animals do not have a chance to replace themselves in their habitats, ensuing in a drastic decrease in natural stocks of abalone. Abalone has an extremely slow growth rate and takes approximately four years to reach a size that is market acceptable; therefore, it was imperative to investigate methods to boost the overall growth rate and immunity of the animal. The University of Cape Town (UCT) began to research, which resulted in the isolation of two microorganisms, a yeast isolate Debaryomyces hansenii and a bacterial isolate Vibrio midae, from the gut of the abalone and characterised them for their probiotic abilities. This work resulted in an internationally competitive concept technology that was patented. The next stage of research was to develop a suitable bioprocess to enable commercial production. Numerous steps were taken to develop an efficient production process for V. midae, one of the isolates found by UCT. The initial stages of research involved the development of a stable and robust inoculum and the optimization of physiological growth parameters such as temperature and pH. A range of temperature and pH conditions were evaluated, and data obtained revealed an optimum growth temperature of 30ᵒC and a pH of 6.5. Once these critical growth parameters were established further media optimization studies were performed. Corn steep liquor (CSL) and high test molasses (HTM) were selected as suitable alternatives to more expensive, conventionally used growth medium additives. The optimization of CSL (6.4 g.l⁻¹) and HTM (24 g.l⁻¹) concentrations in the growth medium resulted in a 180% increase in cell concentration, a 5716-fold increase in cell productivity and a 97.2% decrease in the material cost of production in comparison to conventional growth conditions and parameters used at the onset of the study. In addition, a stable market-ready liquid probiotic product, encompassing the viable but not culturable (VBNC) state of Vibrio midae cells, was developed during the downstream processing aspect of the study. The demonstration of this technology at a full manufacturing scale has further enhanced the attractiveness and commercial feasibility of this production process.

Keywords: probiotics, abalone aquaculture, bioprocess technology, manufacturing scale technology development

Procedia PDF Downloads 67