Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: Peerapong Pornwongthong

3 Selection of Pichia kudriavzevii Strain for the Production of Single-Cell Protein from Cassava Processing Waste

Authors: Phakamas Rachamontree, Theerawut Phusantisampan, Natthakorn Woravutthikul, Peerapong Pornwongthong, Malinee Sriariyanun

Abstract:

A total of 115 yeast strains isolated from local cassava processing wastes were measured for crude protein content. Among these strains, the strain MSY-2 possessed the highest protein concentration (>3.5 mg protein/mL). By using molecular identification tools, it was identified to be a strain of Pichia kudriavzevii based on similarity of D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA region. In this study, to optimize the protein production by MSY-2 strain, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied. The tested parameters were the carbon content, nitrogen content, and incubation time. Here, the value of regression coefficient (R2) = 0.7194 could be explained by the model, which is high to support the significance of the model. Under the optimal condition, the protein content was produced up to 3.77 g per L of the culture and MSY-2 strain contain 66.8 g protein per 100 g of cell dry weight. These results revealed the plausibility of applying the novel strain of yeast in single-cell protein production.

Keywords: single cell protein, response surface methodology, yeast, cassava processing waste

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2 Mechanical and Physical Properties of Various Types of Dental Floss

Authors: Supanitayanon Lalita, Dechkunakorn Surachai, Anuwongnukroh Niwat, Srikhirin Toemsak, Roongrujimek Pitchaya, Tua-Ngam Peerapong

Abstract:

Objective: To compare maximum load, percentage of elongation, physical characteristics of 4 types of dental floss: (1) Thai Silk Floss (silk, waxed), (2) Oral B® Essential Floss (nylon, waxed), (3) Experimental Floss Xu (nylon, unwaxed), (4) Experimental Floss Xw (nylon, waxed). Materials & method: Four types of floss were tested (n=30) with a Universal Testing Machine (Instron®). Each sample (30 cm long, 5 cm segment) was fixed, and pulled apart with load cell of 100 N and a test speed of 100 mm/min. Physical characteristics were investigated by digital microscope under 2.5×10 magnification, and scanning electron microscope under 1×100 and 5×100 magnification. The size of the filaments was measured in micron (μm) and the fineness were measured in Denier. Statistical analysis: For mechanical properties, the maximum load and the percentage of elongation were presented as mean ± SD. The distribution of the data was calculated by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. One-way ANOVA and multiple comparison (Tukey HSD) were used to analyze the differences among the groups with the level of a statistical difference at p < 0.05. Results: The maximum load of Floss Xu, Floss Xw, Oral B and Thai Silk were 47.39, 46.46, 25.38, and 23.70 N, respectively. The percentage of elongation of Oral B, Floss Xw, Floss Xu and Thai Silk were 72.43, 44.62, 31.25, and 16.44%, respectively. All 4 types of dental floss showed statistically differences in both the maximum load and percentage of elongation at p < 0.05, except for maximum load between Floss Xw and Floss Xu that showed no statistically significant difference. Physical characteristics of Thai silk revealed the most disintegrated, the smallest, and the least fine filaments. Conclusion: Floss Xu had the highest maximum load. Oral B had the highest percentage of elongation. Wax coating on Floss X increased the elongation but had no significant effect on the maximum load. The physical characteristics of Thai Silk resulted in the lowest mechanical properties values.

Keywords: dental floss, maximum load, mechanical property, percentage of elongation, physical property

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1 Load-Deflecting Characteristics of a Fabricated Orthodontic Wire with 50.6Ni 49.4Ti Alloy Composition

Authors: Aphinan Phukaoluan, Surachai Dechkunakorn, Niwat Anuwongnukroh, Anak Khantachawana, Pongpan Kaewtathip, Julathep Kajornchaiyakul, Peerapong Tua-Ngam

Abstract:

Aims: The objectives of this study was to determine the load-deflecting characteristics of a fabricated orthodontic wire with alloy composition of 50.6% (atomic weight) Ni and 49.4% (atomic weight) Ti and to compare the results with Ormco, a commercially available pre-formed NiTi orthodontic archwire. Materials and Methods: The ingots alloys with atomic weight ratio 50.6 Ni: 49.4 Ti alloy were used in this study. Three specimens were cut to have wire dimensions of 0.016 inch x0.022 inch. For comparison, a commercially available pre-formed NiTi archwire, Ormco, with dimensions of 0.016 inch x 0.022 inch was used. Three-point bending tests were performed at the temperature 36+1 °C using a Universal Testing Machine on the newly fabricated and commercial archwires to assess the characteristics of the load-deflection curve with loading and unloading forces. The loading and unloading features at the deflection points 0.25, 0.50, 0.75. 1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 mm were compared. Descriptive statistics was used to evaluate each variables, and independent t-test at p < 0.05 was used to analyze the mean differences between the two groups. Results: The load-deflection curve of the 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wires exhibited the characteristic features of superelasticity. The curves at the loading and unloading slope of Ormco NiTi archwire were more parallel than the newly fabricated NiTi wires. The average deflection force of the 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wire was 304.98 g and 208.08 g for loading and unloading, respectively. Similarly, the values were 358.02 g loading and 253.98 g for unloading of Ormco NiTi archwire. The interval difference forces between each deflection points were in the range 20.40-121.38 g and 36.72-92.82 g for the loading and unloading curve of 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wire, respectively, and 4.08-157.08 g and 14.28-90.78 g for the loading and unloading curve of commercial wire, respectively. The average deflection force of the 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wire was less than that of Ormco NiTi archwire, which could have been due to variations in the wire dimensions. Although a greater force was required for each deflection point of loading and unloading for the 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wire as compared to Ormco NiTi archwire, the values were still within the acceptable limits to be clinically used in orthodontic treatment. Conclusion: The 50.6Ni: 49.4Ti wires presented the characteristics of a superelastic orthodontic wire. The loading and unloading force were also suitable for orthodontic tooth movement. These results serve as a suitable foundation for further studies in the development of new orthodontic NiTi archwires.

Keywords: 50.6 ni 49.4 Ti alloy wire, load deflection curve, loading and unloading force, orthodontic

Procedia PDF Downloads 147