Use of Technology to Improve Students’ Attitude in Learning Mathematics of Non-Mathematics Undergraduate Students
Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 32799
Use of Technology to Improve Students’ Attitude in Learning Mathematics of Non-Mathematics Undergraduate Students

Authors: Asia Majeed

Abstract:

This paper will investigate a form of learning mathematics by integrating technology in mathematics specifically for the university first-year calculus class to support students’ engagement in learning which influences students' conceptual and procedural understanding of the calculus content in a better way. The students with good grades in high school calculus generally struggle in first-year university calculus classes in learning mathematical analysis concepts. This problem has to be addressed. If this problem is not resolved, then most likely students with less ability to do mathematics might not able to complete their degrees. In this work, MATLAB is used to help students in learning and in improving calculus concepts.

Keywords: Calculus, first-year university students, teaching strategies, MATLAB.

Procedia APA BibTeX Chicago EndNote Harvard JSON MLA RIS XML ISO 690 PDF Downloads 316

References:


[1] Canfield, R. A. (2012). Teaching Computational Methods to 140+ Second-Year Engineering Students at Virginia Tech https://www.gedcouncil.org/sites/default/files/02.27.15%20Teaching%20Computational%20Methods%20to%20140%2B%20Second-Year%20Engineering%20Students%20at%20Virginia%20Tech.pdf
[2] Colgan, L. (2000). MATLAB in first year engineering math, International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology,31(1) 15-25.
[3] Deny, S J. (1990). Flexible cognitive tools for problem solving instruction. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Boston, MA, April 16–20.
[4] Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset. New York: Random House
[5] Heid, M.K. (2001). Theories that inform the use of CAS in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics. In P. Kent (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Symposium of the Computer Algebra in Mathematics Education Group: [6] K. A. Qing, Principles and standards for school mathematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Edmonds, University of Calgary, 2000.
[7] Kazimovich, M. Z. & Guvercin, S. (2012). Applications of Symbolic computation in MATLAB, International Journal of Computer Applications 41(8).
[8] Kemmis, S. 2009. Action Research as a Practice-Based Practice. Educational Action Research 17 (3): 463–474.
[9] M. Schneiderman, (2004), What does SBR mean for educational technology? T.H.E. Journal, 31(11), 30-36,
[10] Papert, S. (1993). Mindstorms: children, computers and powerful ideas, Basic Books, New York.
[11] Selden, A. (2005). New developments and trends in tertiary mathematics education: or, more of the same? International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 36(2-3), 131-147
[12] Wilkins, J.L.M., 2000. Preparing for the 21st century: The status of quantitative literacy in the United States. School Science and Mathematics, 100(8), 405-418.