Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 5

Search results for: ladybird

5 Predatory Potential of Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus and Coccinella undecimpunctata Linnaeus on Different Prey Species

Authors: Adnan A. E. Darwish

Abstract:

The predatory potential and preference of both larvae and adult of seven-spot ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus and the eleven-spot ladybird, Coccinella undecimpunctata Linnaeus to the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (Linnaeus) and onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman were investigated under laboratory conditions at varying prey densities at faculty of Agriculture, Damanhour university, Egypt. There were significant differences between the consumed numbers of the four different species by the two different lady beetle species. The most consumed prey by C. septempunctata was the A. gossypii followed by R. padi then M. persicae and finally T. tabaci and these results were repeated in case of C. undecimpunctata. As the grubs of C. septempunctata and C. undecimpunctata developed from 1st to 4th larval instars, the consumption rate from aphid species and thrips increased. The consumption rate of M. persicae, A. gossypii, R. padi and T. tabaci significantly increased with the advancement in the larval stage of the predator. The forth larval instar of C. septempunctata and C. undecimpunctata exhibited the highest predatory potential comparing to the first, second and third larval instars. The number of prey eaten by adult stage or different instars of larvae of the two predators increased significantly with prey density, reaching the maximum value when 150 preys were provided compared with 50 and 100 preys.

Keywords: predatory potential, Coccinella septempunctata, Coccinella undecimpunctata, Thrips tabaci, Myzus persicae, Aphis gossypii, Rhopalosiphum padi

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4 Impact of Mixed Prey Population on Predation Potential and Food Preference of a Predaceous Ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata

Authors: Ahmad Pervez

Abstract:

We investigated predation potential and food preference of different life stages of a predaceous ladybird Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleptera: Coccinellidae) using a nutritive food (mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi) and a toxic food (cabbage aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae). We gave monotypic prey, L. erysimi, then B. brassicae to all life stages and found that second, third and fourth instars and adult female C. septempunctata daily consumed greater number of former prey. However, the first instar and the adult male equally consumed both the prey. In choice condition, each larva, adult male and female consumed mixed aphid diet separately in three proportions (i.e. low: high, equal: equal and high: low densities of L. erysimi: B. brassicae). We hypothesized that life stages of C. septempunctata will prefer L. erysimi regardless of its proportions. Laboratory experiment supported this hypothesis only at the adult level showing high values of β and C preference indices. However, it rejects this hypothesis at the larval level, as larvae preferred B. brassicae in certain combinations and showed no preference in a few combinations. We infer that mixing of nutritive diet in a toxic diet may possibly overcome the probable nutritive deficiency and/or reduces the toxicity of toxic diet, especially to the larvae of C. septempunctata. Consumption of high proportion of B. brassicae mixed with fewer L. erysimi suggests that mixed diet could be better for the development of immature stages of C. septempunctata.

Keywords: Coccinella septempunctata, predatory potential, prey preference, Lipaphis erysimi, Brevicoryne brassicae

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3 Study of Phenotypic Polymorphism and Detection of Genotypic Polymorphism in Menochilus sexmaculatus (Coleoptera: Insecta) Using RAPD PCR

Authors: Huma Balouch

Abstract:

Menochilus sexmaculatus commonly known as six spotted zig zag ladybird, is an aphidophagus and the most misidentified Coccinellids due to the occurrence of numerous color variants. The correct identification of Menochilus sexmaculatus and its strains is necessary to implement the use of biological control. In the present study phenotypic and genotypic polymorphism was investigated in Menochilus sexmaculatus collected from Punjab, NWFP and Sindh provinces of Pakistan. Six different morphs of the species were distinguished by analyzing its Elytral color and spot pattern and then Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to generate random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) from six different types of Menochilus sexmaculatus. Forty primers (OPA & OPC Kit) were used to perform RAPD PCR on six different types of Menochilus sexmaculatus of which, seven primers revealed different patterns related to the Menochilus sexmaculatus types. These seven primers (OPA-04, OPA-09, OPA-18, OPC-04, OPC-12, OPC-15 and OPC-18) produced 111 clear polymorphic bands and 6 scorable strain specific markers. The cluster analysis applied to RAPD data showed high polymorphism among six types and it can be concluded that these six types are six polymorphic strains of the same species.

Keywords: Menochilus sexmaculatus, aphidophagus, coccinellids, phenotypic and genotypic polymorphism, RAPD-PCR, strain specific markers

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2 Releasing Two Insect Predators to Control of Aphids Under Open-field Conditions

Authors: Mohamed Ahmed Gesraha, Amany Ramadan Ebeid

Abstract:

Aphids are noxious and serious persistent pests in the open fields worldwide. Many authors studied the possibility of aphid control by applying Ladybirds and Lacewings at different releasing rates under open-field conditions. Results clarify that releasing 3rd instar larvae of Coccinella undecimpunctata at the rate of 1 larva:50 aphid was more effective than 1:100 or 1:200 rates for controlling Aphis gossypii population in Okra field; reflecting more than 90% reduction in the aphid population within 15 days. When Chrysoperla carnea 2nd larval instar were releasing at 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 (predator: aphid), it was noticed that the former rate was the most effective one, inducing 98.93% reduction in aphid population; while the two other rates reflecting less reduction. Additionally, in the case of double releases, the reduction percentage at the 1:5 rate was 99.63%, emphasize that this rate was the most effective one; the other rates induced 97.05 and 95.64% reduction. Generally, a double release was more effective in all tested rates than the single one because of the cumulative existence of the predators in large numbers at the same period of the experiment. It could be concluded that utilizing insect predators (Coccinella undecimpunctata or Chrysoperla carnea) at an early larval stag were faire enough to reduce the aphids’ populations under open fields conditions.

Keywords: releasing predators, lacewings, ladybird, open fields

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1 Lethal and Sub-Lethal Effects of Pyriproxyfen on Demography of Convergent Lady Beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Goeze) (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera)

Authors: Ayesha Iftikhar, Faisal Hafeez, Muhammad Jawad Saleem, Afifa Naeem, Muhammad Sohaib

Abstract:

To further develop integrated pest management (IPM) tactics against insect pests, demographic toxicology is considered important and efficient to evaluate the long-term effects of pesticides on biological control agents. In this study, lethal and sub-lethal effects of Pyriproxyfen (insect growth regulator) two concentrations of LC10 and LC30 were tested on second instar larvae of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Goeze) in order to evaluate the effect of insecticide on demographic parameters of the predator under laboratory conditions. The life table parameters were analysed statistically by using age-stage, two sex life table procedure. The results of this study show that developmental time for immature was prolonged in treated population (LC30 and LC10) rather than in control. Similarly, male and female longevity was also longer in the control group as compared to the treated population. Adult pre-oviposition period and fecundity were also greater in control as compared to the treated population. In addition, population parameters such as net reproductive rate (R0), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ) were also greater in control group rather than treated population. However, mean generation time (T) was greater in the treated group. The results revealed that pyriproxyfen, even at low concentrations, has potential to greatly affect the population growth of predatory lady beetle, therefore care should be taken when insect growth regulators are used within an IPM framework.

Keywords: ladybird beetle, IGR, integrated pest management, population inhibition

Procedia PDF Downloads 60