Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 30309
Medical Knowledge Management in Healthcare Industry

Authors: B. Stroetmann, A. Aisenbrey

Abstract:

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging and therapy, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology, and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better, and more cost effective. The optimization of clinical workflows requires a multidisciplinary focus and a collaborative approach of e.g. medical advisors, researchers and scientists as well as healthcare economists. This new form of collaboration brings together experts with deep technical experience, physicians with specialized medical knowledge as well as people with comprehensive knowledge about health economics. As Charles Darwin is often quoted as saying, “It is neither the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change," We believe that those who can successfully manage this change will emerge as winners, with valuable competitive advantage. Current medical information and knowledge are some of the core assets in the healthcare industry. The main issue is to connect knowledge holders and knowledge recipients from various disciplines efficiently in order to spread and distribute knowledge.

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Trust, business excellence, Clinical Knowledge, Knowledge Services, Learning Organizations

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1058321

Procedia APA BibTeX Chicago EndNote Harvard JSON MLA RIS XML ISO 690 PDF Downloads 2780

References:


[1] N. Wickramasinghe, E. Geisler, "Epistemetrics: Conceptial Domain and Applications of Knowledge Management (KM) in Health Care." PICMET '07. Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology 2007, pp. 1056-1061.
[2] N. Wickramasinghe, "Building a Learning Healthcare Organization by Fostering Organizational Learning through a Process Centric View of Knowledge Management." International Journal of Innovation and Learning, Vol.5, No 2/2008, pp. 201-216.
[3] K. Metaxiotis, "Healthcare Knowledge Management. " Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management, 2006, pp.204-210.
[4] R. Bose, "Knowledge management-enabled health care management systems: capabilities, infrastructure, and decision-support." Expert Systems with Applications, Vol.24, 2003, pp.59-71.
[5] A. Hars, " From publishing to knowledge networks: reinventing online knowledge infrastructures" Springer, 2003.
[6] D. Leonard, W. Swap, "Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer Enduring Business Wisdom " Harvard Business School Press, 2005.
[7] T.H. Davenport, L. Prusak, "Working knowledge: How organizations manage what they know." Harvard Business School Press, 1998.
[8] J. Dang et al., "Process-Oriented Knowledge Sharing and Collaboration through Semantic-Enabled Services." Communications of SIWN, Vol. 7, May 2009, pp.14-22.
[9] Siemens Medical Solutions USA, " The Future of Care" Siemens 2010.
[10] U. Frank, "Knowledge Management Systems: Essential Requirements and Generic Design Patterns" Published in: W. W. Smari, N. Melab, K. Yetongnon, K. (Eds.) "Proceedings of the International Symposium on Information Systems and Engineering." Las Vegas: CSREA Press 2001, pp. 114-121.
[11] U. Frank, "Knowledge Management Systems: Essential Requirements and Generic Design Patterns" Published in: W. W. Smari, N. Melab, K. Yetongnon, K. (Eds.) "Proceedings of the International Symposium on Information Systems and Engineering." Las Vegas: CSREA Press 2001, p. 116.
[12] K. Ergazakis, "Knowledge Management in Enterprises: a research agenda." Intelligent Systems in Accounting, Finance and Management, Vol.13, 2005, pp.17-26.