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High Wire Act: the Perils, Pitfalls and Possibilities of Online Discussions

Authors: Karen Armstrong

Abstract:

Online discussions are an important component of both blended and online courses. This paper examines the varieties of online discussions and the perils, pitfalls and possibilities of this rather new technological tool for enhanced learning. The discussion begins with possible perils and pitfalls inherent in this educational tool and moves to a consideration of the advantages of the varieties of online discussions feasible for use in teacher education programs.

Keywords: online discussions, computer-mediatedcommunication (CMC), computer-supported collaborative learning(CSCL), e-learning, teacher education

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1079330

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