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The Role of Online Videos in Undergraduate Casual-Leisure Information Behaviors

Authors: Nei-Ching Yeh

Abstract:

This study describes undergraduate casual-leisure information behaviors relevant to online videos. Diaries and in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Twenty-four undergraduates participated in this study (9 men, 15 women; all were aged 18–22 years). This study presents a model of casual-leisure information behaviors and contributes new insights into user experience in casual-leisure settings, such as online video programs, with implications for other information domains.

Keywords: Casual-leisure information behaviors, information behavior, online videos, role.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1125429

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