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Multivariate Analysis of Students’ Performance in Math Courses and Specific Engineering Courses

Authors: H. Naccache, R. Hleiss

Abstract:

The aim of this research is to study the relationship between the performance of engineering students in different math courses and their performance in specific engineering courses. The considered courses are taken mainly by engineering students during the first two years of their major. Several factors are being studied, such as gender and final grades in the math and specific engineering courses. Participants of this study comprised a sample of more than thousands of engineering students at Lebanese University during their tertiary academic years. A significant relationship tends to appear between these factors and the performance of students in engineering courses. Moreover, female students appear to outperform their male counterparts in both the math and engineering courses, and a high correlation was found between their grades in math courses and their grades in specific engineering courses. The results and implications of the study were being discussed.

Keywords: Education, engineering, math, performance.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1123677

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