Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Search results for: Terminalia arjuna.

3 Alcoholic Extract of Terminalia Arjuna Protects Rabbit Heart against Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury: Role of Antioxidant Enzymes and Heat Shock Protein

Authors: K. Gauthaman, T.S. Mohamed Saleem, V. Ravi, Sita Sharan Patel, S. Niranjali Devaraj

Abstract:

The present study was designed to investigate the cardio protective role of chronic oral administration of alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna in in-vivo ischemic reperfusion injury and the induction of HSP72. Rabbits, divided into three groups, and were administered with the alcoholic extract of the bark powder of Terminalia arjuna (TAAE) by oral gavage [6.75mg/kg: (T1) and 9.75mg/kg: (T2), 6 days /week for 12 weeks]. In open-chest Ketamine pentobarbitone anaesthetized rabbits, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 15 min of ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. In the vehicle-treated group, ischemic-reperfusion injury (IRI) was evidenced by depression of global hemodynamic function (MAP, HR, LVEDP, peak LV (+) & (- ) (dP/dt) along with depletion of HEP compounds. Oxidative stress in IRI was evidenced by, raised levels of myocardial TBARS and depletion of endogenous myocardial antioxidants GSH, SOD and catalase. Western blot analysis showed a single band corresponding to 72 kDa in homogenates of hearts from rabbits treated with both the doses. In the alcoholic extract of the bark powder of Terminalia arjuna treatment groups, both the doses had better recovery of myocardial hemodynamic function, with significant reduction in TBARS, and rise in SOD, GSH, catalase were observed. The results of the present study suggest that the alcoholic extract of the bark powder of Terminalia arjuna in rabbit induces myocardial HSP 72 and augments myocardial endogenous antioxidants, without causing any cellular injury and offered better cardioprotection against oxidative stress associated with myocardial IR injury.

Keywords: Antioxidants, HSP72, Ischemic reperfusion injury, Terminalia arjuna.

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2 Evaluation of Fuel Properties of Six Tropical Hardwood Timber Species for Briquettes

Authors: S. J. Mitchual, K. Frimpong-Mensah, N. A. Darkwa

Abstract:

The fuel potential of six tropical hardwood species namely: Triplochiton scleroxylon, Ceiba pentandra, Aningeria robusta, Terminalia superba, Celtis mildbreadii and Piptadenia africana were studied. Properties studied included species density, gross calorific value, volatile matter, ash content, organic carbon and elemental composition. Fuel properties were determined using standard laboratory methods. The result indicates that the gross calorific value (GCV) of the species ranged from 20.16 to 22.22 MJ/kg and they slightly varied from each other. Additionally, the GCV of the biomass materials were higher than that of other biomass materials like; wheat straw, rice straw, maize straw and sugar cane. The ash and volatile matter content varied from 0.6075 to 5.0407%, and 75.23% to 83.70% respectively. The overall rating of the properties of the six biomass materials suggested that Piptadenia africana has the best fuel property to be used as briquettes and Aningeria robusta the worse. This study therefore suggests that a holistic assessment of a biomass material needs to be done before selecting it for fuel purpose.

Keywords: Ash content, Briquette, Calorific value, Elemental composition, Species, Volatile matter.

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1 Congolese Wood in the Antwerp Interwar Interior

Authors: M. Jaenen, M. de Bouw, A. Verdonck, M. Leus

Abstract:

During the interwar period artificial materials were often preferred, but many Antwerp architects relied on the application of wood for most of the interior finishing works and furnishings. Archival, literature and on site research of interwar suburban townhouses and the Belgian wood and furniture industry gave a new insight to the application of wood in the interwar interior. Many interwar designers favored the decorative values in all treatments of wood because of its warmth, comfort, good-wearing, and therefore, economic qualities. For the creation of a successful modern interior the texture and surface of the wood becomes as important as the color itself. This aesthetics valuation was the result of the modernization of the wood industry. The development of veneer and plywood gave the possibility to create strong, flat, long and plain wooden surfaces which are capable of retaining their shape. Also the modernization of cutting machines resulted in high quality and diversity in texture of veneer. The flat and plain plywood surfaces were modern decorated with all kinds of veneer-sliced options. In addition, wood species from the former Belgian Colony Congo were imported. Limba (Terminalia superba), kambala (Chlorophora excelsa), mubala (Pentaclethra macrophylla) and sapelli (Entandrophragma cylindricum) were used in the interior of many Antwerp interwar suburban town houses. From the thirties onwards Belgian wood firms established modern manufactures in Congo. There the local wood was dried, cut and prepared for exportation to the harbor of Antwerp. The presence of all kinds of strong and decorative Congolese wood products supported its application in the interwar interior design. The Antwerp architects combined them in their designs for doors, floors, stairs, built-in-furniture, wall paneling and movable furniture.

Keywords: Antwerp, Congo, furniture, interwar.

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