Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

Search results for: triathlon

2 Textile Technology: Application in Sport and Medicine

Authors: R. Taiar

Abstract:

Sport is one of the sectors in which the largest technical projections regarding the functions of textiles can be found. He is a large consumer of high performance composite materials and new fibers. It is one of the sectors where the innovation is the most important when the greatest numbers of spectacular developments are aimed at increasing performance. In medicine, textile innovation is used and contributes in the amelioration of different materials such as dressing, orthosis, bandages, etc. The hygienic textiles in non-woven materials record a strong growth. The objective of this study is to show the different advances of development we obtained in the both ways (sport and medicine). Polyamide fibers where developed tacking into account the specification of the high level athlete’s performance like swimming and triathlon (Olympic Games, Brazil 2016). The first textile utilization was for skiing (Olympic Games, Sotchi 2014). The different textiles technologies where adapted for medicine.

Keywords: smart textile, Medical Textile, Sport textile, Textile innovation

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1 Heart Rate Variability in Responders and Non- Responders to Live-Moderate, Train-Low Altitude Training

Authors: Michael J. Hamlin, Apiwan Manimmanakorn, Gavin R. Sandercock, Jenny J. Ross, Robert H. Creasy, John Hellemans

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an altitude training camp on heart rate variability and performance in elite triathletes. Ten athletes completed 20 days of live-high, train-low training at 1650m. Athletes underwent pre and post 800-m swim time trials at sea-level, and two heart rate variability tests at 1650m on the first and last day of the training camp. Based on their time trial results, athletes were divided into responders and non-responders. Relative to the non-responders, the responders sympathetic-toparasympathetic ratio decreased substantially after 20 days of altitude training (-0.68 ± 1.08 and -1.2 ± 0.96, mean ± 90% confidence interval for supine and standing respectively). In addition, sympathetic activity while standing was also substantially lower post-altitude in the responders compared to the non-responders (-1869 ± 4764 ms2). Results indicate that responders demonstrated a change to more vagal predominance compared to non-responders.

Keywords: Triathlon, parasympathetic predominance, poor performance

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