Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

Search results for: humidity sensor

4 Gate Voltage Controlled Humidity Sensing Using MOSFET of VO2 Particles

Authors: A. A. Akande, B. P. Dhonge, B. W. Mwakikunga, A. G. J. Machatine

Abstract:

This article presents gate-voltage controlled humidity sensing performance of vanadium dioxide nanoparticles prepared from NH4VO3 precursor using microwave irradiation technique. The X-ray diffraction, transmission electron diffraction, and Raman analyses reveal the formation of VO2 (B) with V2O5 and an amorphous phase. The BET surface area is found to be 67.67 m2/g. The humidity sensing measurements using the patented lateral-gate MOSFET configuration was carried out. The results show the optimum response at 5 V up to 8 V of gate voltages for 10 to 80% of relative humidity. The dose-response equation reveals the enhanced resilience of the gated VO2 sensor which may saturate above 272% humidity. The response and recovery times are remarkably much faster (about 60 s) than in non-gated VO2 sensors which normally show response and recovery times of the order of 5 minutes (300 s).

Keywords: VO2, VO2 (B), V2O5, MOSFET, gate voltage, humidity sensor.

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3 A Nobel Approach for Campus Monitoring

Authors: Rashmi Priyadarshini, S. R. N. Reddy, R. M. Mehra

Abstract:

This paper presents one of the best applications of wireless sensor network for campus Monitoring. With the help of PIR sensor, temperature sensor and humidity sensor, effective utilization of energy resources has been implemented in one of rooms of Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. The RISC microcontroller is used here for analysis of output of sensors and providing proper control using ZigBee protocol. This wireless sensor module presents a tremendous power saving method for any campus

Keywords: PIC microcontroller, wireless sensor network, ZigBee.

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2 Heat Stress Monitor by Using Low-Cost Temperature and Humidity Sensors

Authors: Kiattisak Batsungnoen, Thanatchai Kulworawanichpong

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to develop a cost-effective WBGT heat stress monitor which provides precise heat stress measurement. The proposed device employs SHT15 and DS18B20 as a temperature and humidity sensors, respectively, incorporating with ATmega328 microcontroller. The developed heat stress monitor was calibrated and adjusted to that of the standard temperature and humidity sensors in the laboratory. The results of this study illustrated that the mean percentage error and the standard deviation from the measurement of the globe temperature was 2.33 and 2.71 respectively, while 0.94 and 1.02 were those of the dry bulb temperature, 0.79 and 0.48 were of the wet bulb temperature, and 4.46 and 1.60 were of the relative humidity sensor. This device is relatively low-cost and the measurement error is acceptable.

Keywords: Heat stress monitor, WBGT, Temperature and Humidity Sensors.

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1 Gas Detection via Machine Learning

Authors: Walaa Khalaf, Calogero Pace, Manlio Gaudioso

Abstract:

We present an Electronic Nose (ENose), which is aimed at identifying the presence of one out of two gases, possibly detecting the presence of a mixture of the two. Estimation of the concentrations of the components is also performed for a volatile organic compound (VOC) constituted by methanol and acetone, for the ranges 40-400 and 22-220 ppm (parts-per-million), respectively. Our system contains 8 sensors, 5 of them being gas sensors (of the class TGS from FIGARO USA, INC., whose sensing element is a tin dioxide (SnO2) semiconductor), the remaining being a temperature sensor (LM35 from National Semiconductor Corporation), a humidity sensor (HIH–3610 from Honeywell), and a pressure sensor (XFAM from Fujikura Ltd.). Our integrated hardware–software system uses some machine learning principles and least square regression principle to identify at first a new gas sample, or a mixture, and then to estimate the concentrations. In particular we adopt a training model using the Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach with linear kernel to teach the system how discriminate among different gases. Then we apply another training model using the least square regression, to predict the concentrations. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed multiclassification and regression scheme is effective in the identification of the tested VOCs of methanol and acetone with 96.61% correctness. The concentration prediction is obtained with 0.979 and 0.964 correlation coefficient for the predicted versus real concentrations of methanol and acetone, respectively.

Keywords: Electronic nose, Least square regression, Mixture ofgases, Support Vector Machine.

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