Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 8

Search results for: Gas chromatography

8 Optimization of the Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography for Volatile Compounds Determination in Phytophthora Cinnamomi Rands

Authors: Rui Qiu, Giles Hardy, Dong Qu, Robert Trengove, Manjree Agarwal, YongLin Ren

Abstract:

Phytophthora cinnamomi (P. c) is a plant pathogenic oomycete that is capable of damaging plants in commercial production systems and natural ecosystems worldwide. The most common methods for the detection and diagnosis of P. c infection are expensive, elaborate and time consuming. This study was carried out to examine whether species specific and life cycle specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be absorbed by solid-phase microextraction fibers and detected by gas chromatography that are produced by P. c and another oomycete Pythium dissotocum. A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) together with gas chromatography (GC) method was developed and optimized for the identification of the VOCs released by P. c. The optimized parameters included type of fiber, exposure time, desorption temperature and desorption time. Optimization was achieved with the analytes of P. c+V8A and V8A alone. To perform the HS-SPME, six types of fiber were assayed and compared: 7μm Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 100μm Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 50/30μm Divinylbenzene/CarboxenTM/Polydimethylsiloxane DVB/CAR/PDMS), 65μm Polydimethylsiloxane/Divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), 85μm Polyacrylate (PA) fibre and 85μm CarboxenTM/ Polydimethylsiloxane (Carboxen™/PDMS). In a comparison of the efficacy of the fibers, the bipolar fiber DVB/CAR/PDMS had a higher extraction efficiency than the other fibers. An exposure time of 16h with DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber in the sample headspace was enough to reach the maximum extraction efficiency. A desorption time of 3min in the GC injector with the desorption temperature of 250°C was enough for the fiber to desorb the compounds of interest. The chromatograms and morphology study confirmed that the VOCs from P. c+V8A had distinct differences from V8A alone, as did different life cycle stages of P. c and different taxa such as Pythium dissotocum. The study proved that P. c has species and life cycle specific VOCs, which in turn demonstrated the feasibility of this method as means of

Keywords: Optimization, Gas Chromatography, volatile compounds, headspace solid-phase microextraction

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7 In Vitro and Experimental Screening of Mangrove Herbal Extract against Vibrio Alginolyticus in Marine Ornamental Fish

Authors: N. B. Dhayanithi, T. T. Ajith Kumar, T. Balasubramanian

Abstract:

Present study summarizes the control of Vibrio alginolyticus infection in hatchery reared Clownfish, Amphiprion sebae with the extract of the mangrove plant, Avicennia marina. Fishes with visible symptoms of hemorrhagic spots were chosen and the genomic DNA of the causative bacterium was isolated and sequenced based on 16S rDNA gene. The in vitro assay revealed that a fraction of A. marina leaf extract elucidated with ethyl acetate: methanol (6:4) showed a high activity (28 mm) at 125 μg/ml concentrations. About 4 % of the fraction fed along with live V. alginolyticus was significantly decreased the cumulative mortality (P<0.05) in the experimental groups than the control group. The responsible fraction was investigated by gas chromatography - mass spectroscopy and found the presence of active compounds. This is the first research in India to control vibriosis infection in marine ornamental fish with mangrove leaf extract.

Keywords: Avicennia marina, Vibrio alginolyticus, Amphiprion seabe, Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectroscopy

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6 A Study on Flammability of Bio Oil Combustible Vapour Mixtures

Authors: Mohanad El-Harbawi, Nurul Amirah Hanim Bt. Umar, Norizan Ali, Yoshimitsu Uemura

Abstract:

Study of fire and explosion is very important mainly in oil and gas industries due to several accidents which have been reported in the past and present. In this work, we have investigated the flammability of bio oil vapour mixtures. This mixture may contribute to fire during the storage and transportation process. Bio oil sample derived from Palm Kernell shell was analysed using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) to examine the composition of the sample. Mole fractions of 12 selected components in the liquid phase were obtained from the GC-FID data and used to calculate mole fractions of components in the gas phase via modified Raoult-s law. Lower Flammability Limits (LFLs) and Upper Flammability Limits (UFLs) for individual components were obtained from published literature. However, stoichiometric concentration method was used to calculate the flammability limits of some components which their flammability limit values are not available in the literature. The LFL and UFL values for the mixture were calculated using the Le Chatelier equation. The LFLmix and UFLmix values were used to construct a flammability diagram and subsequently used to determine the flammability of the mixture. The findings of this study can be used to propose suitable inherently safer method to prevent the flammable mixture from occurring and to minimizing the loss of properties, business, and life due to fire accidents in bio oil productions.

Keywords: Gas Chromatography, compositions, lower and upper flammability limits (LFL & UFL), flammability diagram

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5 Evaluation of Solid Phase Micro-extraction with Standard Testing Method for Formaldehyde Determination

Authors: Y. L. Yung, Kong Mun Lo

Abstract:

In this study, solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) was optimized to improve the sensitivity and accuracy in formaldehyde determination for plywood panels. Further work has been carried out to compare the newly developed technique with existing method which reacts formaldehyde collected in desiccators with acetyl acetone reagent (DC-AA). In SPME, formaldehyde was first derivatized with O-(2,3,4,5,6 pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) and analysis was then performed by gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). SPME data subjected to various wood species gave satisfactory results, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) obtained in the range of 3.1-10.3%. It was also well correlated with DC values, giving a correlation coefficient, RSQ, of 0.959. The quantitative analysis of formaldehyde by SPME was an alternative in wood industry with great potential

Keywords: formaldehyde, GCMs, Plywood and SPME

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4 Development of Gas Chromatography Model: Propylene Concentration Using Neural Network

Authors: Areej Babiker Idris Babiker, Rosdiazli Ibrahim

Abstract:

Gas chromatography (GC) is the most widely used technique in analytical chemistry. However, GC has high initial cost and requires frequent maintenance. This paper examines the feasibility and potential of using a neural network model as an alternative whenever GC is unvailable. It can also be part of system verification on the performance of GC for preventive maintenance activities. It shows the performance of MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) with Backpropagation structure. Results demonstrate that neural network model when trained using this structure provides an adequate result and is suitable for this purpose. cm.

Keywords: Neural Network, analyzer, levenberg-marquardt, Gas chromatography

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3 Use Cuticular Hydrocarbons as Chemotaxonomic of The Pamphagidae Pamphagus elephas (Insecta, Orthoptera) of Algeria

Authors: M. Bounechada, F. Benia, M. Aiouaz, S. Bouharati, N. Djirar, H. Benamrani

Abstract:

The cuticular hydrocarbons of Pamphagus elephas (Orthoptera: Pamphagidae) has been analysed by gas chromatography and by combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. The following hydrocarbon classes have been identified in insect cuticular hydrocarbons are: n-alkanes and methylalkanes comprising Monomethyl-, dimethyl-and trimethylalkanes. Sexual dimorphism is observed in long chain alkanes (C24-C36) present on male and female. The cuticulars hydrocarbons of P.elephas ranged from 24 to 36 carbons and incluted n-alkanes, Dimethylalkanes and Trimethylalkanes. nalkanes represented by (C24-C36,72,7% on male and 79,2% on female), internally branched Monomethylalkanes identified were (C25, C30-C32,C35-C37;11% on male and 9,4% on female), Dimethylalkanes detected are (C31-C32, C36; 2,2% on male and 2,06% on female) and Trimethylalkanes detected are (C32, C36; 3,1% on male and 4, 97 on female). Larvae male and female (stage 7) showed the same quality of n-alkanes observed in adults. However a difference quantity is noted.

Keywords: Mass Spectrometry, Sexual Dimorphism, Gas Chromatography, Cuticular hydrocarbons, Pamphagus elephas

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2 Utilization of 3-N-trimethylamino-1-propanol by Rhodococcus sp. strain A4 isolated from Natural Soil

Authors: Isam A. Mohamed Ahmed, Jiro Arima, Tsuyoshi Ichiyanagi, Emi Sakuno, Nobuhiro Mori

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to screen for microorganism that able to utilize 3-N-trimethylamino-1-propanol (homocholine) as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The aerobic degradation of homocholine has been found by a gram-positive Rhodococcus sp. bacterium isolated from soil. The isolate was identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain A4 based on the phenotypic features, physiologic and biochemical characteristics, and phylogenetic analysis. The cells of the isolated strain grown on both basal-TMAP and nutrient agar medium displayed elementary branching mycelia fragmented into irregular rod and coccoid elements. Comparative 16S rDNA sequencing studies indicated that the strain A4 falls into the Rhodococcus erythropolis subclade and forms a monophyletic group with the type-strains of R. opacus, and R. wratislaviensis. Metabolites analysis by capillary electrophoresis, fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry, showed trimethylamine (TMA) as the major metabolite beside β-alanine betaine and trimethylaminopropionaldehyde. Therefore, the possible degradation pathway of trimethylamino propanol in the isolated strain is through consequence oxidation of alcohol group (-OH) to aldehyde (-CHO) and acid (-COOH), and thereafter the cleavage of β-alanine betaine C-N bonds yielded trimethylamine and alkyl chain.

Keywords: Homocholine, Quaternary ammonium compounds

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1 Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes Using Nitric Acid Oxidation and DBD Plasma

Authors: M. Vesali Naseh, A. A. Khodadadi, Y. Mortazavi, O. Alizadeh Sahraei, F. Pourfayaz, S. Mosadegh Sedghi

Abstract:

In this study, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified with nitric acid chemically and by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in an oxygen-based atmosphere. Used carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) floating catalyst method. For removing amorphous carbon and metal catalyst, MWNTs were exposed to dry air and washed with hydrochloric acid. Heating purified CNTs under helium atmosphere caused elimination of acidic functional groups. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) shows formation of oxygen containing groups such as C=O and COOH. Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) analysis revealed that functionalization causes generation of defects on the sidewalls and opening of the ends of CNTs. Results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and gas chromatography(GC) indicate that nitric acid treatment create more acidic groups than plasma treatment.

Keywords: plasma, functionalization, Chemical Treatment, carbon nanotubes (CNTs)

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