Hayriye Tokay

Abstracts

3 A Comparative Study: Comparison of Two Different Fluorescent Stains -Auramine and Rhodamine- with Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen, Kinyoun Staining, and Culture in the Determination of Acid Resistant Bacilli

Authors: Recep Keşli, Hayriye Tokay, Cengiz Demir, İsmail Ceyhan

Abstract:

Objective: In many countries, tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the most important diseases. Tuberculosis is among top 10 causes of death worldwide. The early diagnosis of active tuberculosis still depends on the presence of acid resistant bacilli (ARB) in stained smears. In this study, we aimed to investigate the diagnostic performances of Erlich Ziehl Neelsen (EZN), Kinyoun and two different fluorescent stains. Methods: The specimens were obtained from the patients who applied to Chest Diseases Departments of Ankara Atatürk Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, and Afyon Kocatepe University, ANS Research and Practice Hospital. The study was carried out in the Medical Microbiology Laboratory, School of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University. All the non-sterile specimens were homogenized and decontaminated according to the EUCAST instructions. Samples were inoculated onto the Löwenstein-Jensen agars (bio-Merieux Marcy l'Etoile, France) and then incubated at 37˚C, for 40 days. Four smears were prepared from each specimen. Slides were stained with commercial EZN (BD, Sparks, USA), Kinyoun (SALUBRIS Istanbul, Turkey), Auramine (SALUBRIS Istanbul, Turkey) and Rhodamine (SALUBRIS Istanbul, Turkey) kit. While EZN and Kinyoun stainings were examined by light microscope, Auramine and Rhodamine slides were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Results: A total of 158 respiratory system samples (sputum, broncho alveolar lavage fluid…etc) were enrolled into the study. A hundred and two of the samples that processed were found as culture positive. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, and negative predictive values were detected as 100%, 67.5%, 73.5%, and 100% for EZN, 100%, 70.9%, 77.4%, and 100% for Kinyoun, 100%,77.8%, 84.3%, 100% for Auramine, and 100%, 80% , 86.3%, and 100% for Rhodamine respectively. Conclusions: According to our study auramine and rhodamine staining methods showed the best diagnostic performance among the four investigated staining methods. In conclusion, the fluorochrome staining method may be accepted as the most reliable, rapid and useful method for diagnosis of the mycobacterial infections truly.

Keywords: acid resistant bacilli (ARB), auramine, Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen (EZN), Kinyoun, Rhodamine

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2 Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance and Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Production Rates of Gram Negative Rods in a University Research and Practice Hospital, 2012-2015

Authors: Recep Kesli, Cengiz Demir, Onur Turkyilmaz, Hayriye Tokay

Abstract:

Objective: Gram-negative rods are a large group of bacteria, and include many families, genera, and species. Most clinical isolates belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance due to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) is a difficulty in the handling of Enterobacteriaceae infections, but other mechanisms of resistance are also emerging, leading to multidrug resistance and threatening to create panresistant species. We aimed in this study to evaluate resistance rates of Gram-negative rods bacteria isolated from clinical specimens in Microbiology Laboratory, Afyon Kocatepe University, ANS Research and Practice Hospital, between October 2012 and September 2015. Methods: The Gram-negative rods strains were identified by conventional methods and VITEK 2 automated identification system (bio-Mérieux, Marcy l’etoile, France). Antibiotic resistance tests were performed by both the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion and automated Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AST, bio-Mérieux, Marcy l’etoile, France) methods. Disk diffusion results were evaluated according to the standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Of the totally isolated 1.701 Enterobacteriaceae strains 1434 (84,3%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 171 (10%) were Enterobacter spp., 96 (5.6%) were Proteus spp., and 639 Nonfermenting gram negatives, 477 (74.6%) were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 135 (21.1%) were Acinetobacter baumannii and 27 (4.3%) were Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ESBL positivity rate of the totally studied Enterobacteriaceae group were 30.4%. Antibiotic resistance rates for Klebsiella pneumoniae were as follows: amikacin 30.4%, gentamicin 40.1%, ampicillin-sulbactam 64.5%, cefepime 56.7%, cefoxitin 35.3%, ceftazidime 66.8%, ciprofloxacin 65.2%, ertapenem 22.8%, imipenem 20.5%, meropenem 20.5 %, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 50.1%, and for 114 Enterobacter spp were detected as; amikacin 26.3%, gentamicin 31.5%, cefepime 26.3%, ceftazidime 61.4%, ciprofloxacin 8.7%, ertapenem 8.7%, imipenem 12.2%, meropenem 12.2%, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 19.2 %. Resistance rates for Proteus spp. were: 24,3% meropenem, 26.2% imipenem, 20.2% amikacin 10.5% cefepim, 33.3% ciprofloxacin and levofloxacine, 31.6% ceftazidime, 20% ceftriaxone, 15.2% gentamicin, 26.6% amoxicillin-clavulanate, and 26.2% trimethoprim-sulfamethoxale. Resistance rates of P. aeruginosa was found as follows: Amikacin 32%, gentamicin 42 %, imipenem 43%, merpenem 43%, ciprofloxacin 50%, levofloxacin 52%, cefepim 38%, ceftazidim 63%, piperacillin/tacobactam 85%, for Acinetobacter baumannii; Amikacin 53.3%, gentamicin 56.6 %, imipenem 83%, merpenem 86%, ciprofloxacin 100%, ceftazidim 100%, piperacillin/tacobactam 85 %, colisitn 0 %, and for S. malthophilia; levofloxacin 66.6 % and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxozole 0 %. Conclusions: This study showed that resistance in Gram-negative rods was a serious clinical problem in our hospital and suggested the need to perform typification of the isolated bacteria with susceptibility testing regularly in the routine laboratory procedures. This application guided to empirical antibiotic treatment choices truly, as a consequence of the reality that each hospital shows different resistance profiles.

Keywords: Antibiotic Resistance, ESBL, VITEK 2, gram negative rods

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1 Evaluation of the Benefit of Anti-Endomysial IgA and Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase IgA Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Coeliac Disease in a University Hospital, 2010-2016

Authors: Recep Keşli, Onur Türkyılmaz, Hayriye Tokay, Kasım Demir

Abstract:

Objective: Coeliac disease (CD) is a primary small intestine disorder caused by high sensitivity to gluten which is present in the crops, characterized by inflammation in the small intestine mucosa. The goal of this study was to determine and to compare the sensitivity and specificity values of anti-endomysial IgA (EMA IgA) (IFA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (anti-tTG IgA) (ELISA) antibodies in the diagnosis of patients suspected with the CD. Methods: One thousand two hundred seventy three patients, who have applied to gastroenterology and pediatric disease polyclinics of Afyon Kocatepe University ANS Research and Practice Hospital were included into the study between 23.09.2010 and 30.05.2016. Sera samples were investigated by immunofluorescence method for EMA positiveness (Euroimmun, Luebeck, Germany). In order to determine quantitative value of Anti-tTG IgA (EIA) (Orgentec Mainz, Germany) fully automated ELISA device (Alisei, Seac, Firenze, Italy) were used. Results: Out of 1273 patients, 160 were diagnosed with coeliac disease according to ESPGHAN 2012 diagnosis criteria. Out of 160 CD patients, 120 were female, 40 were male. The EMA specificity and sensitivity were calculated as 98% and 80% respectively. Specificity and sensitivity of Anti-tTG IgA were determined as 99% and 96% respectively. Conclusion: The specificity of EMA for CD was excellent because all EMA-positive patients (n = 144) were diagnosed with CD. The presence of human anti-tTG IgA was found as a reliable marker for diagnosis and follow-up the CD. Diagnosis of CD should be established on both the clinical and serologic profiles together.

Keywords: coeliac disease, anti-endomysial antibody, anti-tTG IgA, immunofluorescence assay (IFA)

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