H. Arof

Publications

1 Bright–Dark Pulses in Nonlinear Polarisation Rotation Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser

Authors: R. Z. R. R. Rosdin, N. M. Ali, S. W. Harun, H. Arof

Abstract:

We have experimentally demonstrated bright-dark pulses in a nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) based mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with a long cavity configuration. Bright–dark pulses could be achieved when the laser works in the passively mode-locking regime and the net group velocity dispersion is quite anomalous. The EDFL starts to generate a bright pulse train with degenerated dark pulse at the mode-locking threshold pump power of 35.09 mW by manipulating the polarization states of the laser oscillation modes using a polarization controller (PC). A split bright–dark pulse is generated when further increasing the pump power up to 37.95 mW. Stable bright pulses with no obvious evidence of a dark pulse can also be generated when further adjusting PC and increasing the pump power up to 52.19 mW. At higher pump power of 54.96 mW, a new form of bright-dark pulse emission was successfully identified with the repetition rate of 29 kHz. The bright and dark pulses have a duration of 795.5 ns and 640 ns, respectively.

Keywords: Erbium-doped fiber laser, bright-dark pulse, Nonlinear polarization rotation

Procedia APA BibTeX Chicago EndNote Harvard JSON MLA RIS XML ISO 690 PDF Downloads 1728

Abstracts

2 Bright–Dark Pulses in Nonlinear Polarisation Rotation Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser

Authors: R. Z. R. R. Rosdin, N. M. Ali, S. W. Harun, H. Arof

Abstract:

We have experimentally demonstrated bright-dark pulses in a nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) based mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with a long cavity configuration. Bright–dark pulses could be achieved when the laser works in the passively mode-locking regime and the net group velocity dispersion is quite anomalous. The EDFL starts to generate a bright pulse train with degenerated dark pulse at the mode-locking threshold pump power of 35.09 mW by manipulating the polarization states of the laser oscillation modes using a polarization controller (PC). A split bright–dark pulse is generated when further increasing the pump power up to 37.95 mW. Stable bright pulses with no obvious evidence of a dark pulse can also be generated when further adjusting PC and increasing the pump power up to 52.19 mW. At higher pump power of 54.96 mW, a new form of bright-dark pulse emission was successfully identified with the repetition rate of 29 kHz. The bright and dark pulses have a duration of 795.5 ns and 640 ns, respectively.

Keywords: Photonic, Erbium-doped fiber laser, nonlinear polarization rotation, bright-dark pulse

Procedia PDF Downloads 369
1 Non-Adiabatic Silica Microfibre Sensor for BOD/COD Ratio Measurement

Authors: S. W. Harun, H. Arof, S. S. Chong, A. R. Abdul Aziz

Abstract:

A miniaturized non-adiabatic silica microfiber is proposed for biological oxygen demand (BOD) ratio chemical oxygen demand (COD) sensing for the first time. BOD and COD are two main parameters to justify quality of wastewater. A ratio, BOD:COD can usually be established between the two analytical methods once COD and BOD value has been gathered. This ratio plays a vital role to determine appropriate strategy in wastewater treatment. A non-adiabatic microfiber sensor was formed by tapering the SMF to generate evanescent field where sensitive to perturbation of sensing medium. Because difference ratio BOD and COD contain in solution, this may induced changes of effective refractive index between microfiber and sensing medium. Attenuation wavelength shift to right with 0.5 nm and 3.5 nm while BOD:COD equal to 0.09 and 0.18 respectively. Significance difference wavelength shift may relate with the biodegradability of analyte. This proposed sensor is compact, reliable and feasible to determine the BOD:COD. Further research and investigation should be proceeded to enhance sensitivity and precision of the sensor for several of wastewater online monitoring.

Keywords: Biodegradability, non-adiabatic fiber sensor, environmental sensing, evanescent field

Procedia PDF Downloads 528