Braj Bhushan

Abstracts

3 How Different Are We After All: A Cross-Cultural Study Using the International Affective Picture System

Authors: Braj Bhushan, Manish Kumar Asthana, Alicia Bundis, Zahn Xu

Abstract:

Despite ample cross-cultural studies with emotional valence, it is unclear if the emotions are universal or particular. Previous studies have shown that the individualist culture favors high-valence emotions compared to low-valence emotions. In contrast, collectivist culture favors low-valence emotions compared to high-valence emotions. In this current study, Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians reported valence and semantic-contingency. In total, 120 healthy participants were selected by ethnicity and matched for age and education. Each participant was presented 45 non-chromatic pictures, which were converted from chromatic pictures selected from International Affective Picture Database (IAPS) belonging to five-categories, i.e. (i) less pleasant, (ii) high pleasant, (iii) less unpleasant (iv) high unpleasant (v) neutral. The valence scores assigned to neutral, less-unpleasant, and high-pleasant pictures differed significantly between Chinese, Indian, and Mexicans participants. Significant effects demonstrated from the two-way ANOVAs, confirmed main significant effects of valence (F(1,117) = 24.83, p =0.000) and valence x country (F(2,117) = 2.74, p = 0.035). Significant effects emerging from the one-way ANOVAs were followed up through Bonferroni’s test post-hoc comparisons (p < 0.01). This analysis showed significant effect of neutral (F(2,119) = 6.50, p =0.002), less-unpleasant (F(2,119) = 13.79, p =0.000), and high-unpleasant (F(2,119) = 5.99, p =0.003). There were no significant differences in valence scores for the less-pleasant and more-pleasant between participants from three countries. The IAPS norms require modification for their appropriate application in individualist and collectivist cultures.

Keywords: valence, cultural difference, affective processing, non-chromatic, international affective picture system (IAPS)

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2 Wayfinding Strategies in an Unfamiliar Homogenous Environment

Authors: Braj Bhushan, Ahemd Sameer

Abstract:

The objective of our study was to compare wayfinding strategies to remember route while navigation in an unfamiliar homogenous environment. Two videos developed using free ware Trimble Sketchup© each having nine identical turns (3 right, 3 left, 3 straight) with no distinguishing feature at any turn. Thirt-two male post-graduate students of IIT Kanpur participated in the study. The experiment was conducted in three phases. In the first phase participant generated a list of personally known items to be used as landmarks. In the second phase participant saw the first video and was required to remember the sequence of turns. In the second video participant was required to imagine a landmark from the list generated in the first phase at each turn and associate the turn with it. In both the task the participant was asked to recall the sequence of turns as it appeared in the video. In the third phase, which was 20 minutes after the second phase, participants again recalled the sequence of turns. Results showed that performance in the first condition i.e. without use of landmarks was better than imaginary landmark condition. The difference, however, became significant when the participant were tested again about 30 minutes later though performance was still better in no-landmark condition. The finding is surprising given the past research in memory and is explained in terms of cognitive factors such as mental workload.

Keywords: Memory, Wayfinding, Landmark, Homogenous Environment

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1 Remembering Route in an Unfamiliar Homogenous Environment

Authors: Ahmed Sameer, Braj Bhushan

Abstract:

The objective of our study was to compare two techniques (no landmark vs imaginary landmark) of remembering route while traversing in an unfamiliar homogenous environment. We used two videos each having nine identical turns with no landmarks. In the first video participant was required to remember the sequence of turns. In the second video participant was required to imagine a landmark at each turn and associate the turn with it. In both the task the participant was asked to recall the sequence of turns as it appeared in the video. Results showed that performance in the first condition i.e. without use of landmarks was better than imaginary landmark condition. The difference, however, became significant when the participant were tested again about 30 minutes later though performance was still better in no-landmark condition. The finding is surprising given the past research in memory and is explained in terms of cognitive factors such as mental workload.

Keywords: Cognitive Psychology, Wayfinding, landmarks, unfamiliar environment

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