A. Amiri

Publications

1 Adaptive Thermal Comfort Model for Air-Conditioned Lecture Halls in Malaysia

Authors: S. N. Kazi, B. T. Chew, A. Amiri

Abstract:

This paper presents an adaptive thermal comfort model study in the tropical country of Malaysia. A number of researchers have been interested in applying the adaptive thermal comfort model to different climates throughout the world, but so far no study has been performed in Malaysia. For the use as a thermal comfort model, which better applies to hot and humid climates, the adaptive thermal comfort model was developed as part of this research by using the collected results from a large field study in six lecture halls with 178 students. The relationship between the operative temperature and behavioral adaptations was determined. In the developed adaptive model, the acceptable indoor neutral temperatures lay within the range of 23.9-26.0C, with outdoor temperatures ranging between 27.0-34.6C. The most comfortable temperature for students in lecture hall was 25.7C.

Keywords: hot and humid, lecture halls, neutral temperature, adaptive thermal comfort model

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Abstracts

3 Study of the Influence of the Region, the Depth and the Drying Process on the Chemical Composition of Gelidium sesquipedale

Authors: A. Amiri, T. Ould Bellahcen, F. Hmimid, M. Cherki, I. Taouam

Abstract:

The Moroccan coasts represent an important wealth of red algae which have an economic interest. Among these algae, the Gelidium sesquipedale, which is exploited industrially for its richness in agar. The aim of this study is to establish a general overview of the macronutrient composition of Gelidium sesquipedale and to compare this composition according to three factors: the harvest site (El Jadida, Casablanca and Mohammadia), the harvest depth (coast and depth) and the drying process (open air and oven). Proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates are measured by different methods. The analysis of results show that the protein concentrations of the El Jadida and Mohammadia samples are significantly higher than that of Casablanca (0.026 ± 0.0007 µg/µg DW 0.024 ± 0.001 µg/µg DW and 0.006 ± 0.0007 µg/µg DW, p < 0.05 respectively). However, Casablanca samples are significantly richer in total sugars (0.023 ± 0.002 µg/µg DW, p < 0.05) and less rich in reducing sugars (0.0001 ± 0.00001 µg/µg DW, p < 0.05) compared to other samples. The lipid concentrations of the samples from the three harvest sites do not show any significant difference. With respect to depth, only total protein and total sugar concentrations were significantly higher in the coast versus depth samples (0.035 ± 0.004 µg/µg DW vs. 0.026 ± 0.0007 µg/µg DW and 0.035 ± 0.006 µg/µg DW vs. 0.012 ± 0.005 µg/µg DW p < 0.05 respectively). For the drying process, protein, total sugars and lipid concentrations were significantly higher in open air samples compared to oven samples (0.006 ± 0.0007 µg/µg DW). vs 0.004 ± 0.0003 µg/µg DW, 0.023 ± 0.002 µg/µg DW vs 0.007 ± 0.002 µg/µg DW and 8% vs 4% p < 0.05 respectively). Our results demonstrate that the chemical composition of Gelidium sesquipedale varies according to the harvest region. In addition, samples harvested on the coast and dried in the open air are the richest in macronutrients.

Keywords: Drying, region, biochemical composition, depth, red algae, Gelidium sesquipedale

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2 Evaluation of Moroccan Microalgae Spirulina platensis as a Potential Source of Natural Antioxidants

Authors: A. Amiri, T. Ould Bellahcen, I. Touam, F. Hmimid, A. El Amrani, M. Cherki

Abstract:

The antioxidant activity of three extracts (water, lipidic and ethanolic) prepared from the microalgae Spirulina platensis isolated from Moroccan lake, using 2, 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2’-azino-bis ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical assay, was studied and compared. The obtained results revealed that the IC₅₀ found using DPPH were lower than that of ABTS for all extracts from these planktonic blue-green algae. The high levels of phenolic and flavonoid content were found in the ethanolic extract 0,33 ± 0,01 mg GAE/g dw and 0,21 ± 0,01 mg quercetin/g dw respectively. In addition, using DPPH, the highest activity with IC₅₀ = 0,449 ± 0,083 mg/ml, was found for the ethanolic extract, followed by that of lipidic extract (IC₅₀ = 0,491 ± 0,059 mg/ml). The lowest activity was for the aqueous extract (IC₅₀ = 4,148 ± 0,132 mg/ml). For ABTS, the highest activity was observed for the lipidic extract with IC₅₀ = 0,740 ± 0,012 mg/ml, while, the aqueous extract recorded the lowest activity (IC₅₀ = 6,914 ± 0, 0067 mg/ml). A moderate activity was showed for the ethanolic extract (IC₅₀ = 5,852 ± 0, 0171 mg/ml). It can be concluded from this first study that Spirulina platensis extracts show an interesting antioxidant and antiradicals properties suggesting that this alga could be used as a potential source of antioxidants. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of polyphenol and flavonoids in the extracts using HPLC is in progress so as to study the correlation between the antioxidant activity and chemical composition.

Keywords: DPPH, antioxidant, ABTS, Spirulina platensis

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1 Adaptive Thermal Comfort Model for Air-Conditioned Lecture Halls in Malaysia

Authors: S. N. Kazi, B. T. Chew, A. Amiri

Abstract:

This paper presents an adaptive thermal comfort model study in the tropical country of Malaysia. A number of researchers have been interested in applying the adaptive thermal comfort model to different climates throughout the world, but so far no study has been performed in Malaysia. For the use as a thermal comfort model, which better applies to hot and humid climates, the adaptive thermal comfort model was developed as part of this research by using the collected results from a large field study in six lecture halls with 178 students. The relationship between the operative temperature and behavioral adaptations was determined. In the developed adaptive model, the acceptable indoor neutral temperatures lay within the range of 23.9-26.0 oC, with outdoor temperatures ranging between 27.0–34.6oC. The most comfortable temperature for students in the lecture hall was 25.7 oC.

Keywords: hot and humid, lecture halls, neutral temperature, adaptive thermal comfort model

Procedia PDF Downloads 195