Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 8

tertiary education Related Abstracts

8 The Concept of Community Participation and Identified Tertiary Education Problems, Strategies and Methods

Authors: Ada Adoga James

Abstract:

This paper discussed the concept of community participation and identified tertiary education problems; strategies and methods communities could be involved to reduce conflict witnessed in our tertiary institutions of learning due to government inability to fund education. The paper pointed out that community participation through the use of Parent Teachers Association (PTA), age grade, traditional leaders, village based associations, religious and political organs could be sensitized to raise financial resources. The paper identified different sources of conflicts, the outcome of which causes prolonged academic activities, destruction of lives and properties and in some cased render school environment completely insecure for serious academic activities. It recommends involvement of community participation in assisting government, proper handling of tertiary institutions in management, and more democratic procedure in conflict resolution like cordial relationship between staff, students and trade unions in decision making process.

Keywords: Psychology, Psychiatry, Community, Conflict Resolution, tertiary education

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7 Development of Mobile Application for Internship Program Management Using the Concept of Model View Controller (MVC) Pattern

Authors: Shutchapol Chopvitayakun

Abstract:

Nowadays, especially for the last 5 years, mobile devices, mobile applications and mobile users, through the deployment of wireless communication and mobile phone cellular network, all these components are growing significantly bigger and stronger. They are being integrated into each other to create multiple purposes and pervasive deployments into every business and non-business sector such as education, medicine, traveling, finance, real estate and many more. Objective of this study was to develop a mobile application for seniors or last-year students who enroll the internship program at each tertiary school (undergraduate school) and do onsite practice at real field sties, real organizations and real workspaces. During the internship session, all students as the interns are required to exercise, drilling and training onsite with specific locations and specific tasks or may be some assignments from their supervisor. Their work spaces are both private and government corporates and enterprises. This mobile application is developed under schema of a transactional processing system that enables users to keep daily work or practice log, monitor true working locations and ability to follow daily tasks of each trainee. Moreover, it provides useful guidance from each intern’s advisor, in case of emergency. Finally, it can summarize all transactional data then calculate each internship cumulated hours from the field practice session for each individual intern.

Keywords: Mobile Application, tertiary education, internship, Android OS, smart phone devices, mobile transactional processing system, guidance and monitoring, senior students, model view controller (MVC)

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6 From Paper to the Ether: The Innovative and Historical Development of Distance Education from Correspondence to On-Line Learning and Teaching in Queensland Universities over the past Century

Authors: B. Adcock, H. van Rensburg

Abstract:

Education is ever-changing to keep up with innovative technological development and the rapid acceleration of globalisation. This chapter introduces the historical development and transformation of teaching in distance education from correspondence to on-line learning in Queensland universities. It furthermore investigates changes to the delivery models of distance education that have impacted on teaching at tertiary level in Queensland, and reflects on the social changes that have taken place during the past 100 years. This includes an analysis of the following five different periods in time: Foundation period (1911-1919) including World War I; 1920-1939 including the Great Depression; 1940-1970s, including World War II and the post war reconstruction; and the current technological era (1980s to present). In Queensland, the concept of distance education was begun by the University of Queensland (UQ) in 1911, when it began offering extension courses. The introduction of modern technology, in the form of electronic delivery, dramatically changed tertiary distance education due to political initiatives. The inclusion of electronic delivery in education signifies change at many levels, including policy, pedagogy, curriculum and governance. Changes in delivery not only affect the way study materials are delivered, but also the way courses are be taught and adjustments made by academics to their teaching methods.

Keywords: Distance Education, tertiary education, innovative technological development, on line education

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5 Alternative Funding Strategies for Tertiary Education in Nigeria: Quest for Improved Quality of Teaching and Learning

Authors: Temitayo Olaitan

Abstract:

There is a growing concern about the quality of Nigerian tertiary education. This paper maintains that quality in tertiary education relates to the development of intellectual independence, which sharpens the minds of the individual and helps transform the society economically, socially and politically. However, the paper underscores underfunding as a critical challenge to the quality of teaching and learning in tertiary education. To this end, this paper emphasizes the role of internally generated revenue (IGR) and other alternative funding strategies (public-private partnership) as inevitable for quality tertiary education. This paper hinges on stakeholders approach as a means of ensuring quality teaching and learning in tertiary education. This paper recommends that school managers should seek professional and more efficient ways of developing their revenue generating systems. It also recommends that institutions should restructure to accommodate an alternative funding strategy such as private/corporate sponsorship to ensure that sustainable initiatives are created. The paper concludes that Nigerian government should come up with a policy on how private sectors should support in improving the quality of tertiary education through active participation in funding and physical facilities development in Nigerian higher institutions of learning.

Keywords: tertiary education, quality education, alternative funding, budgetary allocation

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4 Play in College: Shifting Perspectives and Creative Problem-Based Play

Authors: Agni Stylianou-Georgiou, Eliza Pitri

Abstract:

This study is a design narrative that discusses researchers’ new learning based on changes made in pedagogies and learning opportunities in the context of a Cognitive Psychology and an Art History undergraduate course. The purpose of this study was to investigate how to encourage creative problem-based play in tertiary education engaging instructors and student-teachers in designing educational games. Course instructors modified content to encourage flexible thinking during game design problem-solving. Qualitative analyses of data sources indicated that Thinking Birds’ questions could encourage flexible thinking as instructors engaged in creative problem-based play. However, student-teachers demonstrated weakness in adopting flexible thinking during game design problem solving. Further studies of student-teachers’ shifting perspectives during different instructional design tasks would provide insights for developing the Thinking Birds’ questions as tools for creative problem solving.

Keywords: Educational Games, tertiary education, creative problem-based play, flexible thinking

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3 The Interplay of Factors Affecting Learning of Introductory Programming: A Comparative Study of an Australian and an Indian University

Authors: Ritu Sharma, Haifeng Shen

Abstract:

Teaching introductory programming is a challenging task in tertiary education and various factors are believed to have influence on students’ learning of programming. However, these factors were largely studied independently in a chosen context. This paper aims to investigate whether interrelationships exist among the factors and whether the interrelationships are context-dependent. In this empirical study, two universities were chosen from two continents, which represent different cultures, teaching methodologies, assessment criteria and languages used to teach programming in west and east worlds respectively. The results reveal that some interrelationships are common across the two different contexts, while others appear context-dependent.

Keywords: Interrelationships, context, factors, tertiary education, empirical study, introductory programming

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2 An Analysis of the Oral Communication Strategies Used by Omani Senior American Literature Students at the Tertiary Level: A Case Study at a Public University in Muscat, Oman

Authors: Susanne Shunnaq

Abstract:

During the past decade, an increasing number of higher education institutions in Oman have sought accreditation in an attempt to assure the quality of their programs. Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), the only public university in the country, has also been seeking accreditation. Hence, the university administration has been encouraging departments to evaluate their programs for development purposes. The Department of English, where 100% of the students are learners of English as a foreign language, already produced a self-study report that outlined the strength and weaknesses of the current program. The department came to the realization that due to a changing local and regional job market, transferrable communication skills are high in demand among stakeholders in the public and private sectors. Failure to equip English literature students, for example, with excellent verbal communicative skills in English may have detrimental effects for undergraduate job-seekers who have to compete for jobs in employment sectors with a predominantly English-speaking workforce. Ongoing extensive discussions about restructuring the current literature program by means of partially replacing literature courses with skills courses, hoping to produce higher quality graduates who are equipped with effective communication skills for local and regional markets, have sparked the idea for this research. The researcher, who is an American Literature specialist at SQU, has set out to investigate to what extent senior American literature students have been able to apply transferable communication skills in an advanced literature course. The study also attempts to unearth performance inhibitors and causes for communication breakdown. The primary data source for the study were audio-recordings of 6 in-class peer-group discussions in an advanced contemporary American literature course during the academic year 2016/2017. The significance of this research lies in the rarity of studies focusing on verbal communication skills in Omani higher education literature classrooms at a time when English programs are in the process of being re-visited and revamped both for accreditation purposes and for meeting job-market demands. The results showed a considerable variation in Omani students' verbal communicative abilities and English proficiency levels. The study also raises crucial questions and provides important recommendations for administrators and teachers alike who are in the process of restructuring English programs in the region and in non-English speaking countries worldwide.

Keywords: Literature, tertiary education, oman, job-market, oral communication skills

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1 Poor Proficiency of English Language among Tertiary Level Students in Bangladesh and Its Effect on Employability: An Investigation to Find Fact and Solution

Authors: Tanvir Ahmed, Nahian Fyrose Fahim, Subrata Majumder, Tek Winesberry

Abstract:

English is unanimously recognized as the standard second language in the world, and no one can deny this fact. Many people believe that possessing English proficiency skills is the key to communicating effectively globally, especially for developing countries, which can bring further success to itself on many fronts, as well as to other countries, by ensuring its people worldwide access to education, business, and technology. A notable number of students in Bangladesh are currently pursuing higher education, especially at the tertiary or collegiate level in more than 150 public and private universities. English is the dominant linguistic medium through which college instruction and lectures are given to students in Bangladesh. However, many of our students who had only completed their primary and secondary levels of education in the Bangla medium or language are generally in an awkward position to suddenly take and complete many unfamiliar requirements by the time they enter the university as freshmen. As students, they struggle to complete at least 18 courses to acquire proficiency in English. After obtaining a tertiary education certificate, the students could then have the opportunity to acquire a sustainable position in the job market industry; however, many of them do fail unfortunately, because of poor English proficiency skills. After statistical analysis, the study suggested certain remedial measures that could be taken in order to increase students’ proficiency in English as well as to ensure their employability potential.

Keywords: Employability, tertiary education, English language proficiency, unemployment problems

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