Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 6

teacher preparation Related Abstracts

6 Learning to Teach on the Cloud: Preservice EFL Teachers’ Online Project-Based Practicum Experience

Authors: Mei-Hui Liu

Abstract:

This paper reports 20 preservice EFL teachers’ learning-to-teach experience when they were engaged in an online project-based practicum implemented on a Cloud Platform. This 10-month study filled in the literature gap by documenting the impact of online project-based instruction on preservice EFL teachers’ professional development. Data analysis showed that the online practicum was regarded as a flexible mechanism offering chances of teaching practices without geographical barriers. Additionally, this project-based practice helped the participants integrate the theories they had learned and further foster them how to create a self-directed online learning environment. Furthermore, these preservice teachers with experiences of technology-enabled practicum showed their motivation to apply technology and online platforms into future instructional practices. Yet, this study uncovered several concerns encountered by these participants during this online field experience. The findings of this study rendered meaning and lessons for teacher educators intending to integrate online practicum into preservice training courses.

Keywords: Project-Based Learning, online teaching practicum, teacher preparation, English language education

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5 Using Computer Simulations to Prepare Teachers

Authors: Roberta Gentry

Abstract:

The presentation will begin with a brief literature review of the use of computer simulation in teacher education programs. This information will be summarized. Additionally, based on the literature review, advantages and disadvantages of using computer simulation in higher education will be shared. Finally, a study in which computer simulations software was used with 50 initial licensure teacher candidates in both an introductory course and a behavior management course will be shared. Candidates reflected on their experiences with using computer simulation. The instructor of the course will also share lessons learned.

Keywords: Teacher Education, Educational Research, Simulations, teacher preparation

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4 Examining Attrition in English Education: A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Preparation, Persistence, and Dispositions in Teacher Education

Authors: Pamela K. Coke, Heidi Frederiksen, Ann Sebald

Abstract:

Over the past three years, the researchers have been tracking a rise in the number of teacher education candidates leaving the field before completing their university’s educator preparation program. At their institution, this rise is most pronounced in English Education. The purpose of this qualitative research study is to understand English Education teacher candidates' expectations in becoming prepared educators at each phase of their four phase teacher education program at one institution of higher education in the United States. Research questions include: To what extent do we find differences in teacher candidates' expectations of their teacher training program and student teaching experiences based upon undergraduate and graduate programs? Why do (or do not) teacher candidates persist in their teacher training program and student teaching experiences? How do dispositions develop through the course of the teacher training program? What supports do teacher candidates self-identify as needing at each phase of the teacher training program? Based upon participant interviews at each phase of the teacher education program, the researchers, all teacher educators, examine the extent to which English Education students feel prepared to student teach, focusing on preparation, persistence, and dispositions. The Colorado State University Center for Educator Preparation (CEP) provides students with information about teaching dispositions, or desired professional behaviors, throughout their education program. CEP focuses these dispositions around nine categories: Professional Behaviors, Initiative and Dependability, Tact and Judgment, Ethical Behavior and Integrity, Collegiality and Responsiveness, Effective Communicator, Desire to Improve Own Performance, Culturally Responsive, and Commitment to the Profession. Currently, in the first phase of a four phase study, initial results indicate participants expect their greatest joys will be working with and learning from students. They anticipate their greatest challenges will involve discipline and confidence. They predict they will persist in their program because they believe the country needs well-prepared teachers and they have a commitment to their professional growth. None of the participants thus far could imagine why they would leave the program. With regard to strongest and weakest dispositions, results are mixed. Some participants see Tact and Judgment as their strongest disposition; others see it as their weakest. All participants stated mentoring is a necessary support at every phase of the teacher preparation process. This study informs the way teacher educators train and evaluate teacher candidates, and has implications for the frequency and types of feedback students receive from mentors and supervisors. This research contributes to existing work on teacher retention, candidate persistence, and dispositional development.

Keywords: teacher preparation, persistence, English education, dispositions

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3 Reviewing Special Education Preservice Teachers' Reflective Practices over Two Field Experiences: Topics and Changes in Reflection

Authors: Laurie U. deBettencourt

Abstract:

During pre-service field experiences teacher candidates are often asked to reflect as part of their training and in this investigation candidates’ reflective journal entries were reviewed, coded and analyzed with results suggesting teacher candidates need more direct instruction on how to describe, analyze, and make judgements on their instructional practices so that their practices improve over time. Teacher education programs often incorporate reflective-based activities during field experiences. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if special education teacher candidate’s reflective practices changed as they completed their two supervised field experiences and to determine what topics the candidates focused on in their reflections. The six females graduate students were completing two field experiences in special education classrooms within one academic year as part of their coursework leading to a master’s degree and special education teacher state certification. Each candidate wrote 15 reflection journal entries (approximately 200 words each) per field experience. Each of the journal entries were reviewed sentence by sentence to determine a reflective practice score and to determine the topics discussed. The reflective practice score was calculated using four dimensions of reflection (describe, analyze, judge, and apply) in order to create a continuous variable representing their reflective practice across four points of time. A One-way Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) suggested that special education teacher candidates did not change their reflective practices over time (i.e., at time-point one the practitioner’s mean score was 56.0 out of 100 (SD = 7.6), 53.8 (SD = 4.3) at time-point two, 51.2 (SD = 4.5) at time-point three, and 57.7 (SD = 8.2) at time-point four). Qualitative findings suggest candidates focused mostly on themselves in their reflections. Conclusions suggest the need for teacher preparation programs to provide more direct instruction on how a teacher should reflect. Specific implications are provided for teacher training and future research.

Keywords: teacher preparation, special educators, field experiences, reflective practices

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2 An Online Master's Degree Program for the Preparation of Adapted Physical Education Teachers for Children with Significant Developmental Disabilities

Authors: Jiabei Zhang

Abstract:

Online programs developed for preparing qualified teachers have significantly increased over the years in the United States of America (USA). However, no online graduate programs for training adapted physical education (APE) teachers for children with significant developmental disabilities are currently available in the USA. The purpose of this study was to develop an online master’s degree program for the preparation of APE teachers to serve children with significant developmental disabilities. The characteristics demonstrated by children with significant developmental disabilities, the competencies required for certified APE teachers, and the evidence-based positive behavioral interventions (PBI) documented for teaching children with significant developmental disabilities were fully reviewed in this study. An online graduate program with 14 courses for 42 credit hours (3 credit hours per course) was then developed for training APE teachers to serve children with significant developmental disabilities. Included in this online program are five components: (a) 2 capstone courses, (b) 4 APE courses, (c) 4 PBI course, (d) 2 elective courses, and (e) 2 capstone courses. All courses will be delivered online through Desire2Learn administered by the Extended University Programs at Western Michigan University (WMU). An applicant who has a bachelor’s degree in physical education or special education is eligible for this proposed program. A student enrolled in this program is expected to complete all courses in 2.5 years while staying in their local area. This program will be submitted to the WMU curriculum committee for approval in the fall of 2018.

Keywords: teacher preparation, adapted physical education, online program, and significant disabilities

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1 A Standard-Based Competency Evaluation Scale for Preparing Qualified Adapted Physical Education Teachers

Authors: Jiabei Zhang

Abstract:

Although adapted physical education (APE) teacher preparation programs are available in the nation, a consistent standards-based competency evaluation scale for preparing of qualified personnel for teaching children with disabilities in APE cannot be identified in the literature. The purpose of this study was to develop a standard-based competency evaluation scale for assessing qualifications for teaching children with disabilities in APE. Standard-based competencies were reviewed and identified based on research evidence documented as effective in teaching children with disabilities in APE. A standard-based competency scale was developed for assessing qualifications for teaching children with disabilities in APE. This scale included 20 standard-based competencies and a 4-point Likert-type scale for each standard-based competency. The first standard-based competency is knowledgeable of the causes of disabilities and their effects. The second competency is the ability to assess physical education skills of children with disabilities. The third competency is able to collaborate with other personnel. The fourth competency is knowledgeable of the measurement and evaluation. The fifth competency is to understand federal and state laws. The sixth competency is knowledgeable of the unique characteristics of all learners. The seventh competency is the ability to write in behavioral terms for objectives. The eighth competency is knowledgeable of developmental characteristics. The ninth competency is knowledgeable of normal and abnormal motor behaviors. The tenth competency is the ability to analyze and adapt the physical education curriculums. The eleventh competency is to understand the history and the philosophy of physical education. The twelfth competency is to understand curriculum theory and development. The thirteenth competency is the ability to utilize instructional designs and plans. The fourteenth competency is the ability to create and implement physical activities. The fifteenth competency is the ability to utilize technology applications. The sixteenth competency is to understand the value of program evaluation. The seventeenth competency is to understand professional standards. The eighteenth competency is knowledgeable of the focused instruction and individualized interventions. The nineteenth competency is able to complete a research project independently. The twentieth competency is to teach children with disabilities in APE independently. The 4-point Likert-type scale ranges from 1 for incompetent to 4 for highly competent. This scale is used for assessing if one completing all course works is eligible for receiving an endorsement for teaching children with disabilities in APE, which is completed based on the grades earned on three courses targeted for each standard-based competency. A mean grade received in three courses primarily addressing a standard-based competency will be marked on a competency level in the above scale. The level 4 is marked for a mean grade of A one receives over three courses, the level 3 for a mean grade of B over three courses, and so on. One should receive a mean score of 3 (competent level) or higher (highly competent) across 19 standard-based competencies after completing all courses specified for receiving an endorsement for teaching children with disabilities in APE. The validity, reliability, and objectivity of this standard-based competency evaluation scale are to be documented.

Keywords: teacher preparation, evaluation scale, adapted physical education teachers, and children with disabilities

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