Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 5

tannic acid Related Abstracts

5 Natural Dyeing on Wool Fabrics Using Some Red Rose Petals

Authors: Burcu Yilmaz Şahinbaşkan, Emrah Çimen, Mustafa Demirelli, Mahmure Üstün Özgür

Abstract:

Natural colours are used on a large area such as textile, food and pharmaceutical industries by many researchers. When tannic acid is used together with metal salts for dyeing with natural dyes, antibacterial and fastness properties of textile materials are increased. In addition, the allegens are removed on wool fabrics. In this experimental work, some red rose petals were applied as a natural dye with three different dyeing methods and eight different mordant salts. The effect of tannic acid and different metal salts on dyeing of wool fabric was studied. Colour differences ΔECMC (2:1) and fastness properties of dyed fabrics were investigated and compared with each other. Finally, dark colours and adequate colour fastness results (4+) were obtained after dyeing of wool fabrics with FeSO4.7H2O, FeCl3.6H2O and CuCl2.2H2O in the presence of the tannic acid.

Keywords: natural dye, red rose petals, tannic acid, mordant salts, wool fabric

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4 Fabrication and Analysis of Simplified Dragonfly Wing Structures Created Using Balsa Wood and Red Prepreg Fibre Glass for Use in Biomimetic Micro Air Vehicles

Authors: Thomas Arthur Ward, Praveena Nair Sivasankaran, Rubentheren Viyapuri

Abstract:

Paper describes a methodology to fabricate a simplified dragonfly wing structure using balsa wood and red prepreg fibre glass. These simplified wing structures were created for use in Biomimetic Micro Air Vehicles (BMAV). Dragonfly wings are highly corrugated and possess complex vein structures. In order to mimic the wings function and retain its properties, a simplified version of the wing was designed. The simplified dragonfly wing structure was created using a method called spatial network analysis which utilizes Canny edge detection method. The vein structure of the wings were carved out in balsa wood and red prepreg fibre glass. Balsa wood and red prepreg fibre glass was chosen due to its ultra- lightweight property and hence, highly suitable to be used in our application. The fabricated structure was then immersed in a nanocomposite solution containing chitosan as a film matrix, reinforced with chitin nanowhiskers and tannic acid as a crosslinking agent. These materials closely mimic the membrane of a dragonfly wing. Finally, the wings were subjected to a bending test and comparisons were made with previous research for verification. The results had a margin of difference of about 3% and thus the structure was validated.

Keywords: chitosan, chitin, canny edge detection, tannic acid, dragonfly wings, simplified, balsa wood, red prepreg

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3 Colorimetric Detection of Melamine in Milk Sample by Using In-Situ Formed Silver Nanoparticles by Tannic Acid

Authors: Md Fazle Alam, Amaj Ahmed Laskar, Hina Younus

Abstract:

Melamine toxicity which causes renal failure and death of humans and animals have recently attracted worldwide attention. Developing an easy, fast and sensitive method for the routine melamine detection is the need of the hour. Herein, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, one step and selective colorimetric method for the detection of melamine in milk samples based upon in-situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via tannic acid at room temperature. These AgNPs thus formed were characterized by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscope (TEM), zetasizer and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Under optimal conditions, melamine could be selectively detected within the concentration range of 0.05-1.4 µM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10.1 nM, which is lower than the strictest melamine safety requirement of 1 ppm. This assay does not utilize organic cosolvents, enzymatic reactions, light sensitive dye molecules and sophisticated instrumentation, thereby overcoming some of the limitations of conventional methods.

Keywords: Silver Nanoparticles, melamine, tannic acid, milk adulteration

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2 Chelating Effect of Black Tea Extract Compared to Citric Acid in the Process of the Oxidation of Sunflower, Canola, Olive, and Tallow Oils

Authors: Yousef Naserzadeh, Niloufar Mahmoudi

Abstract:

Oxidation resistance is one of the important parameters in maintaining the quality of olive oil during its storage. Ensuring the stability of the quality of olive oil is one of the important concerns of the producers and consumers. Prooxidants such as iron and copper accelerate the oxidation reaction, and also anti-oxidants and chelating compounds delay it. In this study, chelating effect of tea extract which contains significant amounts of tannic acid is investigated in comparison with citric acid. To do it, 0.1 ppm copper was added to these four kinds of oil, sunflower, olive, canola, and tallow, and then chelating effect of citric acid (0.01%), tannic acid (0.01%) and tea extract (0.1%) were measured by adding to this composition. To this end, the resistance time of the oils against oxidation was measured at 120 °C and an air flow of 20 liters per hour. And the value of peroxide was measured by oven test in six periods of 24 hours at 105 °C. The results showed that citric acid, tannic acid and tea extract had chelating property and increased the resistance time of the studied oils. As a result, considering chelating property and increasing resistance of oil, tannic acid showed better effect than tea extract and tea extract had better effect than citric acid.

Keywords: edible oils, tannic acid, black tea extract, chelate, TBHQ

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1 Solvent-Aided Dispersion of Tannic Acid to Enhance Flame Retardancy of Epoxy

Authors: Matthew Korey, Jeffrey Youngblood, John Howarter

Abstract:

Background and Significance: Tannic acid (TA) is a bio-based high molecular weight organic, aromatic molecule that has been found to increase thermal stability and flame retardancy of many polymer matrices when used as an additive. Although it is biologically sourced, TA is a pollutant in industrial wastewater streams, and there is a desire to find applications in which to downcycle this molecule after extraction from these streams. Additionally, epoxy thermosets have revolutionized many industries, but are too flammable to be used in many applications without additives which augment their flame retardancy (FR). Many flame retardants used in epoxy thermosets are synthesized from petroleum-based monomers leading to significant environmental impacts on the industrial scale. Many of these compounds also have significant impacts on human health. Various bio-based modifiers have been developed to improve the FR of the epoxy resin; however, increasing FR of the system without tradeoffs with other properties has proven challenging, especially for TA. Methodologies: In this work, TA was incorporated into the thermoset by use of solvent-exchange using methyl ethyl ketone, a co-solvent for TA, and epoxy resin. Samples were then characterized optically (UV-vis spectroscopy and optical microscopy), thermally (thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry), and for their flame retardancy (mass loss calorimetry). Major Findings: Compared to control samples, all samples were found to have increased thermal stability. Further, the addition of tannic acid to the polymer matrix by the use of solvent greatly increased the compatibility of the additive in epoxy thermosets. By using solvent-exchange, the highest loading level of TA found in literature was achieved in this work (40 wt%). Conclusions: The use of solvent-exchange shows promises for circumventing the limitations of TA in epoxy.

Keywords: Sustainable, epoxy, flame retardant, tannic acid

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