Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

starter culture Related Abstracts

4 The Production of B-Group Vitamin by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Its Importance in Food Industry

Authors: Goksen Arik, Mihriban Korukluoglu

Abstract:

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been used commonly in the food industry. They can be used as natural preservatives because acidifying carried out in the medium can protect the last product against microbial spoilage. Besides, other metabolites produced by LAB during fermentation period have also an antimicrobial effect on pathogen and spoilage microorganisms in the food industry. LAB are responsible for the desirable and distinctive aroma and flavour which are observed in fermented food products such as pickle, kefir, yogurt, and cheese. Various LAB strains are able to produce B-group vitamins such as folate (B11), riboflavin (B2) and cobalamin (B12). Especially wild-type strains of LAB can produce B-group vitamins in high concentrations. These cultures may be used in food industry as a starter culture and also the microbial strains can be used in encapsulation technology for new and functional food product development. This review is based on the current applications of B-group vitamin producing LAB. Furthermore, the new technologies and innovative researches about B vitamin production in LAB have been demonstrated and discussed for determining their usage availability in various area in the food industry.

Keywords: Technology, Food industry, Lactic Acid Bacteria, B vitamin, starter culture

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3 Selection of a Potential Starter Culture for Milk Fermentation

Authors: Stephen Olusanmi Akintayo, Ilesanmi Fadahunsi

Abstract:

The ability of Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to grow and survive in milk is being exploited in industrial and biotechnological applications. Although considerable studies have been reported on the fermentation of milk, however, not so much work has been documented on the selection of LAB strains from milk of the Nigerian local cattle breeds for their starter culture potentials. A total of 110 LAB were isolated from raw milk of Sokoto gudali cattle breed. The isolates were screened for their proteolytic activities on skimmed milk media with isolates A07, F06 and A01 showing the highest zone of clearance of 18.5mm, 18.5mm, and 18.0mm respectively and were selected for the studies of their growth in different constituents of milk. A01, F06, and A07 were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteriodes respectively using cultural, biochemical, physiological and molecular characterization techniques. Leuconostoc mesenteriodes showed the highest growth in all the milk components that were used in this study. The three LAB species selected showed a growth range of 6.46 log cfu/ml to 10.91 log cfu/ml in lactose with Leuconostoc mesenteriodes showing the highest growth of 10.91 log cfu/ml while Pediococcus acidilactici recorded the lowest growth of 9.78 log cfu/ml. In medium containing leucine as the only amino acid, the viable counts of Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactococcus raffinolactis and Leuconostoc mesenteriodes in log cfu/ml at zero hour were 6.39, 6.36 and 6.38 respectively which increased to 9.31 log cfu/ml, 9.21 log cfu/ml, 9.92 log cfu/ml respectively after 24 hours. Similarly, in all other substrates (casein, lysine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid ) tested in this study, Leuconostoc mesenteriodes showed the highest growth. It was observed that the highest quantity of lactic acid (15.31mg/ml) was produced by Leuconostoc mesenteriodes. The same trend was also observed in the production of diacetyl and hydrogen peroxide by the three tested microorganisms. Due to its ability to grow maximally in milk components, Leuconostoc mesenteriodes shows potential as starter culture for milk fermentation.

Keywords: Lactic Acid Bacteria, starter culture, Leuconostoc mesenteriodes, Sokoto gudali

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2 Selection of Potential Starter Using Their Transcription Level

Authors: Elif Coskun Daggecen, Seyma Dokucu, Yekta Gezginc, Ismail Akyol

Abstract:

Fermented dairy food quality is mainly determined by the sensory perception and influenced by many factors. Today, starter cultures for fermented foods are being developed to have a constant quality in these foods. Streptococcus thermophilus is one of the main species of most a starter cultures of yogurt fermentation. This species produces lactate by lactose fermentation from pyruvate. On the other hand, a small amount of pyruvate can alternatively be converted to various typical yoghurt flavor compounds such as diacetyl, acetoin, acetaldehyde, or acetic acid, for which the activity of three genes are shown to be especially important; ldh, nox and als. Up to date, commercially produced yoghurts have not yet met the desired aromatic properties that Turkish consumers find in traditional homemade yoghurts. Therefore, it is important to select starters carrying favorable metabolic characteristics from natural isolates. In this study, 30 strains of Str. Thermophilus were isolated from traditional Turkish yoghurts obtained from different regions of the country. In these strains, transcriptional levels of ldh, nox and als genes were determined via a newly developed qPCR protocol, which is a more reliable and precision method for analyzing the quantitative and qualitative expression of specific genes in different experimental conditions or in different organisms compared to conventional analytical methods. Additionally, the metabolite production potentials of the isolates were measured. Of all the strains examined, 60% were found to carry the metabolite production potential and the gene activity which appeared to be suitable to be used as a starter culture. Probable starter cultures were determined according to real-time PCR results.

Keywords: Gene expression, RT-PCR, Streptococcus thermophilus, starter culture

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1 Production of Soy Yoghurt Using Soymilk-Based Lactic Acid Bacteria as Starter Culture

Authors: Ayobami Solomon Popoola, Victor N. Enujiugha

Abstract:

Production of soy-yogurt by fermentation of soymilk with lactic acid bacteria isolated from soymilk was studied. Soymilk was extracted from dehulled soybean seeds and pasteurized at 95 °C for 15 min. The soymilk was left to naturally ferment (temperature 40 °C; time 8 h) and lactic acid bacteria were isolated, screened and selected for yogurt production. Freshly prepared soymilk was pasteurized (95 °C, 15 min), inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria isolated (3% w/v starter culture) and incubated at 40 °C for 8 h. The yogurt produced was stored at 4 °C. Investigations were carried out with the aim of improving the sensory qualities and acceptability of soy yogurt. Commercial yogurt was used as a control. The percentage of soymilk inoculated was 70% of the broth. Soy-yoghurt samples produced were subsequently subjected to biochemical and microbiological assays which included total viable counts of fresh milk and soy-based yoghurt; proximate composition of functional soy-based yoghurt fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum; changes in pH, Titratable acidity, and lactic acid bacteria during a 14 day period of storage; as well as morphological and biochemical characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolated. The results demonstrated that using Lactobacillus plantarum to inoculate soy milk for yogurt production takes about 8 h. The overall acceptability of the soy-based yogurt produced was not significantly different from that of the control sample. The use of isolate from soymilk had the added advantage of reducing the cost of yogurt starter culture, thereby making soy-yogurt, a good source of much desired good quality protein. However, more experiments are needed to improve the sensory qualities such as beany or astringent flavor and color.

Keywords: yoghurt, soy, starter culture, soymilk

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