Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 5

speaking skills Related Abstracts

5 Functional English: Enhancing Competencies at the Undergraduate Level in Nagaland, India

Authors: Arenkala Kichu

Abstract:

This paper consolidates and tries to bring out the findings that investigated in Kohima and Mokokchung districts in Nagaland, which is in the northeastern part of India. The aim of this paper is to test the speaking and writing skills of the undergraduate learners who opt functional English as one of their papers. functional English is taught in just two colleges; Fazl Ali College and Kohima Colleges, out of 15 government and 36 private colleges in the state. This research (based on several observations made by Naga researchers) hypothesizes that functional English enhances competencies at the undergraduate level, which would open doors to work, learn more and better prospects. It is expected that learners in Functional English class, which follows the communicative language teaching method, might be the answers to those problems, as to why proficiency level still leaves much to be desired, in spite of the advent of the education over a hundred years ago. This type of teaching follows only in functional English class in these two colleges.

Keywords: writing skills, enhancing competencies, speaking skills, undergraduate level

Procedia PDF Downloads 181
4 The Views of German Preparatory Language Programme Students about German Speaking Activity

Authors: Eda Üstünel, Seval Karacabey

Abstract:

The students, who are enrolled in German Preparatory Language Programme at the School of Foreign Languages, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, Turkey, learn German as a foreign language for two semesters in an academic year. Although the language programme is a skills-based one, the students lack German speaking skills due to their fear of making language mistakes while speaking in German. This problem of incompetency in German speaking skills exists also in their four-year departmental study at the Faculty of Education. In order to address this problem we design German speaking activities, which are extra-curricular activities. With the help of these activities, we aim to lead Turkish students of German language to speak in the target language, to improve their speaking skills in the target language and to create a stress-free atmosphere and a meaningful learning environment to communicate in the target language. In order to achieve these aims, an ERASMUS+ exchange staff (a German trainee teacher of German as a foreign language), who is from Schwabisch Gmünd University, Germany, conducted out-of-class German speaking activities once a week for three weeks in total. Each speaking activity is lasted for one and a half hour per week. 7 volunteered students of German preparatory language programme attended the speaking activity for three weeks. The activity took place at a cafe in the university campus, that’s the reason, we call it as an out-of-class activity. The content of speaking activity is not related to the topics studied at the units of coursebook, that’s the reason, we call this activity as extra-curricular one. For data collection, three tools are used. A questionnaire, which is an adapted version of Sabo’s questionnaire, is applied to seven volunteers. An interview session is then held with each student on individual basis. The interview questions are developed so as to ask students to expand their answers that are given at the questionnaires. The German trainee teacher wrote fieldnotes, in which the teacher described the activity in the light of her thoughts about what went well and which areas were needed to be improved. The results of questionnaires show that six out of seven students note that such an acitivity must be conducted by a native speaker of German. Four out of seven students emphasize that they like the way that the activities are designed in a learner-centred fashion. All of the students point out that they feel motivated to talk to the trainee teacher in German. Six out of seven students note that the opportunity to communicate in German with the teacher and the peers enable them to improve their speaking skills, the use of grammatical rules and the use of vocabulary.

Keywords: speaking skills, Learning a Foreign Language, Teaching German as a Foreign Language, Turkish Learners of German Language

Procedia PDF Downloads 188
3 Select Communicative Approaches and Speaking Skills of Junior High School Students

Authors: Sonia Arradaza-Pajaron

Abstract:

Speaking English, as a medium of instruction among students who are non-native English speakers poses a real challenge to achieve proficiency, especially so if it is a requirement in most communicative classroom instruction. It becomes a real burden among students whose English language orientation is not well facilitated and encouraged by teachers among national high schools. This study, which utilized a descriptive-correlational research, examined the relationship between the select communicative approaches commonly utilized in classroom instruction to the level of speaking skills among the identified high school students. Survey questionnaires, interview, and observations sheets were researcher instruments used to generate salient information. Data were analyzed and treated statistically utilizing weighted mean speaking skills levels and Pearson r to determine the relationship between the two identified variables of the study. Findings revealed that the level of English speaking skills of the high school students is just average. Further, among the identified speaking sub-skills, namely, grammar, pronunciation and fluency, the students were considered above average level. There was also a clear relationship of some communicative approaches to the respondents’ speaking skills. Most notable among the select approaches is that of role-playing, compared to storytelling, informal debate, brainstorming, oral reporting, and others. It may be because role-playing is the most commonly used approach in the classroom. This implies that when these high school students are given enough time and autonomy on how they could express their ideas or comprehension of some lessons, they are shown to have a spontaneous manner of expression, through the maximization of the second language. It can be concluded further that high school students have the capacity to express ideas even in the second language, only if they are encouraged and well-facilitated by teachers. Also, when a better communicative approach is identified and better implemented, thus, will level up students’ classroom engagement.

Keywords: Comprehension, speaking skills, communicative approaches, role playing

Procedia PDF Downloads 47
2 Working Memory Capacity and Motivation in Japanese English as a Foreign Language Learners' Speaking Skills

Authors: Akiko Kondo

Abstract:

Although the effects of working memory capacity on second/foreign language speaking skills have been researched in depth, few studies have focused on Japanese English as a foreign language (EFL) learners as compared to other languages (Indo-European languages), and the sample sizes of the relevant Japanese studies have been relatively small. Furthermore, comparing the effects of working memory capacity and motivation which is another kind of frequently researched individual factor on L2 speaking skills would add to the scholarly literature in the field of second language acquisition research. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to investigate whether working memory capacity and motivation have significant relationships with Japanese EFL learners’ speaking skills and to investigate the degree to which working memory capacity and motivation contribute to their English speaking skills. One-hundred and ten Japanese EFL students aged 18 to 26 years participated in this study. All of them are native Japanese speakers and have learned English as s foreign language for 6 to 15. They completed the Versant English speaking test, which has been widely used to measure non-native speakers’ English speaking skills, two types of working memory tests (the L1-based backward digit span test and the L1-based listening span test), and the language learning motivation survey. The researcher designed the working memory tests and the motivation survey. To investigate the relationship between the variables (English speaking skills, working memory capacity, and language learning motivation), a correlation analysis was conducted, which showed that L2 speaking test scores were significantly related to both working memory capacity and language learning motivation, although the correlation coefficients were weak. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis was performed, with L2 speaking skills as the dependent variable and working memory capacity and language learning motivation as the independent variables. The results showed that working memory capacity and motivation significantly explained the variance in L2 speaking skills and that the L2 motivation had slightly larger effects on the L2 speaking skills than the working memory capacity. Although this study includes several limitations, the results could contribute to the generalization of the effects of individual differences, such as working memory and motivation on L2 learning, in the literature.

Keywords: Individual Differences, Motivation, Working memory, speaking skills

Procedia PDF Downloads 28
1 Analysis of Speaking Skills in Turkish Language Acquisition as a Foreign Language

Authors: Lokman Gozcu, Sule Deniz Gozcu

Abstract:

This study aims to analyze the skills of speaking in the acquisition of Turkish as a foreign language. One of the most important things for the individual who learns a foreign language is to be successful in the oral communication (speaking) skills and to interact in an understandable way. Speech skill requires much more time and effort than other language skills. In this direction, it is necessary to make an analysis of these oral communication skills, which is important in Turkish language acquisition as a foreign language and to draw out a road map according to the result. The aim of this study is to determine the competence and attitudes of speaking competence according to the individuals who learn Turkish as a foreign language and to be considered as speaking skill elements; Grammar, emphasis, intonation, body language, speed, ranking, accuracy, fluency, pronunciation, etc. and the results and suggestions based on these determinations. A mixed method has been chosen for data collection and analysis. A Likert scale (for competence and attitude) was applied to 190 individuals who were interviewed face-to-face (for speech skills) with a semi-structured interview form about 22 participants randomly selected. In addition, the observation form related to the 22 participants interviewed were completed by the researcher during the interview, and after the completion of the collection of all the voice recordings, analyses of voice recordings with the speech skills evaluation scale was made. The results of the research revealed that the speech skills of the individuals who learned Turkish as a foreign language have various perspectives. According to the results, the most inadequate aspects of the participants' ability to speak in Turkish include vocabulary, using humorous elements while speaking Turkish, being able to include items such as idioms and proverbs while speaking Turkish, Turkish fluency respectively. In addition, the participants were found not to feel comfortable while speaking Turkish, to feel ridiculous and to be nervous while speaking in formal settings. There are conclusions and suggestions for the situations that arise after the have been analyses made.

Keywords: speaking skills, learning Turkish as a foreign language, proficiency criteria, phonetic (modalities)

Procedia PDF Downloads 120