Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 8

self compacting concrete Related Abstracts

8 The Influence of Zeolitic Spent Refinery Admixture on the Rheological and Technological Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Self- Compacting Concrete

Authors: Paulius Grigaliunas, Žymantas Rudžionis, Danutė Vaičiukynienė

Abstract:

By planning this experimental work to investigate the effect of zeolitic waste on rheological and technological properties of self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete, we had an intention to draw attention to the environmental factor. Large amount of zeolitic waste, as a secondary raw materials are not in use properly and large amount of it is collected without a clear view of it’s usage in future. The principal aim of this work is to assure, that zeolitic waste admixture takes positive effect to the self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete mixes stability, flowability and other properties by using the experimental research methods. In addition to that a research on cement and zeolitic waste mortars were implemented to clarify the effect of zeolitic waste on properties of cement paste and stone. Primary studies indicates that zeolitic waste characterizes clear puzzolanic behavior, do not deteriorate and in some cases ensure positive rheological and mechanical characteristics of self-compacting concrete mixes.

Keywords: self compacting concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, zeolitic waste, rheological, properties of concrete, slump flow

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7 Nonlinear Analysis of Torsionally Loaded Steel Fibred Self-Compacted Concrete Beams Reinforced by GFRP Bars

Authors: Khaled Saad Eldin Mohamed Ragab

Abstract:

This paper investigates analytically the torsion behavior of steel fibered high strength self compacting concrete beams reinforced by GFRP bars. Nonlinear finite element analysis on 12­ beams specimens was achieved by using ANSYS software. The nonlinear finite element analysis program ANSYS is utilized owing to its capabilities to predict either the response of reinforced concrete beams in the post elastic range or the ultimate strength of a reinforced concrete beams produced from steel fiber reinforced self compacting concrete (SFRSCC) and reinforced by GFRP bars. A general description of the finite element method, theoretical modeling of concrete and reinforcement are presented. In order to verify the analytical model used in this research using test results of the experimental data, the finite element analysis were performed. Then, a parametric study of the effect ratio of volume fraction of steel fibers in ordinary strength concrete, the effect ratio of volume fraction of steel fibers in high strength concrete, and the type of reinforcement of stirrups were investigated. A comparison between the experimental results and those predicted by the existing models are presented. Results and conclusions thyat may be useful for designers have been raised and represented.

Keywords: Nonlinear Analysis, self compacting concrete, torsionally loaded, steel fiber reinforced self compacting concrete (SFRSCC), GFRP bars and sheets

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6 Effect of Strength Class of Concrete and Curing Conditions on Capillary Absorption of Self-Compacting and Conventional Concrete

Authors: Emine Ebru Demirci, Remzi Sahin

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to compare Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) and Conventional Concrete (CC), which are used in beams with dense reinforcement, in terms of their capillary absorption. During the comparison of SCC and CC, the effects of two different factors were also investigated: concrete strength class and curing condition. In the study, both SCC and CC were produced in three different concrete classes (C25, C50 and C70) and the other parameter (i.e curing condition) was determined as two levels: moisture and air curing. Beam dimensions were determined to be 200 x 250 x 3000 mm. Reinforcements of the beams were calculated and placed as 2ø12 for the top and 3ø12 for the bottom. Stirrups with dimension 8 mm were used as lateral rebar and stirrup distances were chosen as 10 cm in the confinement zone and 15 cm at the central zone. In this manner, densification of rebars in lateral cross-sections of beams and handling of SCC in real conditions were aimed. Concrete covers of the rebars were chosen to be equal in all directions as 25 mm. The capillary absorption measurements were performed on core samples taken from the beams. Core samples of ø8x16 cm were taken from the beginning (0-100 cm), middle (100-200 cm) and end (200-300 cm) region of the beams according to the casting direction of SCC. However core samples were taken from lateral surface of the beams. In the study, capillary absorption experiments were performed according to Turkish Standard TS EN 13057. It was observed that, for both curing environments and all strength classes of concrete, SCC’s had lower capillary absorption values than that of CC’s. The capillary absorption values of C25 class of SCC are 11% and 16% lower than that of C25 class of CC for air and moisture conditions, respectively. For C50 class, these decreases were 6% and 18%, while for C70 class, they were 16% and 9%, respectively. It was also detected that, for both SCC and CC, capillary absorption values of samples kept in moisture curing are significantly lower than that of samples stored in air curing. For CC’s; C25, C50 and C70 class moisture-cured samples were found to have 26%, 12% and 31% lower capillary absorption values, respectively, when compared to the air-cured ones. For SCC’s; these values were 30%, 23% and 24%, respectively. Apart from that, it was determined that capillary absorption values for both SCC and CC decrease with increasing strength class of concrete for both curing environments. It was found that, for air cured CC, C50 and C70 class of concretes had 39% and 63% lower capillary absorption values compared to the C25 class of concrete. For the same type of concrete samples cured in the moisture environment, these values were found to be 27% and 66%. It was found that for SCC samples, capillary absorption value of C50 and C70 concretes, which were kept in air curing, were 35% and 65% lower than that of C25, while for moisture-cured samples these values were 29% and 63%, respectively. When standard deviations of the capillary absorption values are compared for core samples obtained from the beginning, middle and end of the CC and SCC beams, it was found that, in all three strength classes of concrete, the variation is much smaller for SCC than CC. This demonstrated that SCC’s had more uniform character than CC’s.

Keywords: self compacting concrete, reinforced concrete beam, capillary absorption, strength class, curing condition

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5 Enhancing Value of Dam Dredged Sediments as a Component of a Self Compacting Concrete

Authors: N. Bouhamou, A. Mebrouki, N. Belas, O. Belaribi, S. Aggoun, K. Bendani

Abstract:

This experimental work is a part of a long research on the valorization of the dam dredged sediments issued from Fergoug Dam (Mascara-West Algeria). These sediments have to be subjected to thermal treatment to become reactive with the cement and thus to obtain an artificial pozzolana. It is therefore a question of developing the calcined mud as substitutable material in part to the cement used in the composition of self compacting concrete. The objective of the present work is to highlight its influence on the behavior of self compacting concrete compared to that of the natural pozzolana and this, in fresh and hardened states. The study is being conducted on three SCC, the first using 20% in volume of natural pozzolana, the second with 20 % of calcined mud and the third for the sake of comparison is made with cement only. The first results showed the possibility of obtaining SCC with calcined mud complying with the AFGC recommendations having a good mechanical behavior which makes interesting its development as construction materials.

Keywords: Sediments, Valorization, self compacting concrete, fresh state, dam, hardened state mud

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4 Restrained Shrinkage Behavior of Self Consolidating Concrete

Authors: Boudjelthia Radhwane

Abstract:

Self-compacting concrete (SCC) developed in Japan in the late 80s has enabled the construction industry to reduce demand on the resources, improve the work condition and also reduce the impact of environment by elimination of the need for compaction. The shrinkage of concrete is the main cause of cracking in bridge decks. Bridge decks tend to be restrained from shrinkage, and this restraint along with other factors causes the bridge to crack. The characteristics of SCC under restrained shrinkage are important to understand in order to predict the cracking behavior in actual structures. Restrained shrinkage testing is done in accordance to AASHTO testing protocol. The free shrinkage performance and cracking behavior were reported and compared when changing the sand to aggregate ratio and the water to cement ratio. The results of free shrinkage show that when a mix design has higher free shrinkage, it will crack in restrained shrinkage earlier than a mix with lower free shrinkage.

Keywords: self compacting concrete, concrete mix, cracking behavior, restrained shrinkage

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3 Predicting Durability of Self Compacting Concrete Using Artificial Neural Network

Authors: R. Boudjelthia

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to determine the influence of mix composition of concrete as the content of water and cement, water–binder ratio, and the replacement of fly ash on the durability of self compacting concrete (SCC) by using artificial neural networks (ANNs). To achieve this, an ANNs model is developed to predict the durability of self compacting concrete which is expressed in terms of chloride ions permeability in accordance with ASTM C1202-97 or AASHTO T277. Database gathered from the literature for the training and testing the model. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted using the trained and tested ANN model to investigate the effect of fly ash on the durability of SCC. The results indicate that the developed model is reliable and accurate. the durability of SCC expressed in terms of total charge passed over a 6-h period can be significantly improved by using at least 25% fly ash as replacement of cement. This study show that artificial neural network have strong potentialas a feasible tool for predicting accurately the durability of SCC containing fly ash.

Keywords: Artificial Neural Networks, Durability, self compacting concrete, chloride ions permeability

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2 Fracture Crack Monitoring Using Digital Image Correlation Technique

Authors: B. G. Patel, A. K. Desai, S. G. Shah

Abstract:

The main of objective of this paper is to develop new measurement technique without touching the object. DIC is advance measurement technique use to measure displacement of particle with very high accuracy. This powerful innovative technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. For this study, nine geometrically similar beam specimens of different sizes with (steel fibers and glass fibers) and without fibers were tested under three-point bending in a closed loop servo-controlled machine with crack mouth opening displacement control with a rate of opening of 0.0005 mm/sec. Digital images were captured before loading (unreformed state) and at different instances of loading and were analyzed using correlation techniques to compute the surface displacements, crack opening and sliding displacements, load-point displacement, crack length and crack tip location. It was seen that the CMOD and vertical load-point displacement computed using DIC analysis matches well with those measured experimentally.

Keywords: Fibres, Size Effect, digital image correlation, self compacting concrete

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1 Utilization of Waste Marble Dust as a Viscosity Modifying Agent in Self Compacting Concrete

Authors: Shams Ul Khaliq, Fawad Bilal, Mushtaq Zeb, Faizan Akbar, Syed Aamir Abbas

Abstract:

Self Compacting Concrete as the name implies--is the concrete requiring a very little or no vibration to fill the form homogeneously. Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) is defined by two primary properties: Ability to flow or deform under its own weight (with or without obstructions) and the ability to remain homogeneous while doing so. Flow ability is achieved by utilizing high range water reducing admixtures and segregation resistance is ensured by introducing a chemical viscosity modifying admixture (VMA) or increasing the amount of fines in the concrete. The study explores the use waste marble dust (WMD) to increase the amount of fines and hence achieve self-compatibility in an economical way, suitable for Pakistani construction industry. The study focuses on comparison of fresh properties of SCC containing varying amounts of waste marble dust (WMD) with that containing commercially available viscosity modifying admixture. The comparison is done at different dosages of super plasticizer keeping cement, water, coarse aggregate, and fine aggregate contents constant.

Keywords: self compacting concrete, segregation resistance, waste marble dust (WMD), flow ability

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