Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3608

Search results for: writing ability

3608 The Comparative Effect of Practicing Self-Assessment and Critical Thinking Skills on EFL Learners’ Writing Ability

Authors: Behdokht Mall-Amiri, Sara Farzaminejad

Abstract:

The purpose of the present study was to discover which of the two writing activities, a self-assessment questioner or a critical thinking skills handout, is more effective on Iranian EFL learners’ writing ability. To fulfill the purpose of the study, a sample of 120 undergraduate students of English SAT for a standardized sample of PET. Eighty-two students whose scores fell one standard deviation above and below the sample mean were selected and randomly divided into two equal groups. One group practiced self-assessment and the other group practiced critical thinking skills while they were learning process writing. A writing posttest was finally administered to the students in both groups and the mean rank scores were compared by t-test. The result led to the rejection of the null hypothesis, indicating that practicing critical thinking skills had a significantly higher effect on the writing ability. The implications of the study for students and teachers as well as course book designers are discussed.

Keywords: writing ability, process writing, critical thinking skills, self-assessment

Procedia PDF Downloads 218
3607 Increasing the Ability of State Senior High School 12 Pekanbaru Students in Writing an Analytical Exposition Text through Comic Strips

Authors: Budiman Budiman

Abstract:

This research aimed at describing and testing whether the students’ ability in writing analytical exposition text is increased by using comic strips at SMAN 12 Pekanbaru. The respondents of this study were the second-grade students, especially XI Science 3 academic year 2011-2012. The total number of students in this class was forty-two (42) students. The quantitative and qualitative data was collected by using writing test and observation sheets. The research finding reveals that there is a significant increase of students’ writing ability in writing analytical exposition text through comic strips. It can be proved by the average score of pre-test was 43.7 and the average score of post-test was 65.37. Besides, the students’ interest and motivation in learning are also improved. These can be seen from the increasing of students’ awareness and activeness in learning process based on observation sheets. The findings draw attention to the use of comic strips in teaching and learning is beneficial for better learning outcome.

Keywords: analytical exposition, comic strips, secondary school students, writing ability

Procedia PDF Downloads 62
3606 English Writing Anxiety in Debate Writing among Japanese Senior High School EFL Learners: Sources, Effects and Implication

Authors: Maria Lita Sudo

Abstract:

The debate is an effective tool in cultivating critical thinking skills in English classes. It involves writing evidence-based arguments about a resolution in a form of constructive speech and oral discussion using constructive speech, which will then be attacked and defended. In the process of writing, EFL learners may experience anxiety, an emotional problem that affects writing achievement and cognitive processing. Thus, this study explored the sources and effect of English writing anxiety in the context of debate writing with a view to providing EFL teachers pedagogical suggestions in alleviating English writing anxiety in debate writing. The participants of this study are 95 Japanese senior high school EFL learners and 3 Japanese senior high school English teachers. In selecting the participants, opportunity sampling was employed and consent from Japanese English teachers was sought. Data were collected thru (1) observation (2) open-ended questionnaire and (3) semi-structured interview. This study revealed that not all teachers of English in the context of this study recognize the existence of English writing anxiety among their students and that the very nature of the debate, in general, may also be a source of English writing anxiety in the context of debate writing. The interview revealed that English writing anxiety affects students’ ability to retrieve L2 vocabulary. Further, this study revealed different sources of writing anxiety in debate writing, which can be categorized into four main categories: (1) L2 linguistic ability-related factors (2) instructional –related factors, (3) interpersonal-related factors, and (4) debate- related factors. Based on the findings, recommendations for EFL teachers and EFL learners in managing writing anxiety in debate writing are provided.

Keywords: debate, EFL learners, English writing anxiety, sources

Procedia PDF Downloads 31
3605 Academic Writing vs Creative Writing for Arabic Speaking Students

Authors: Yacoub Aljaffery

Abstract:

Many English writing instructors try to avoid creative writing in their classrooms thinking they need to teach essay rules and organization skills. They seem to forget that creative writing has do’s and don’ts as well. While academic writing is different from fiction writing in some important ways (although perhaps the boundaries are fruitfully blurring), there is much that can be writerly selves. The differences between creative writing and academic writing are that creative writing is written mainly to entertain with the creativity of the mind and academic writing is written mainly to inform in a formal manner or to incite the reader to make an action such as purchase the writer’s product. In this research paper, we are going to find out how could Arabic speaking students, who are learning academic writing in universities, benefit from creative writing such as literature, theatrical scripts, music, and poems. Since Arabic language is known as poetic language, students from this culture tend to like writing with creativity. We will investigate the positive influence of creative writing rules on academic essays and paragraphs in universities, and We will prove the importance of using creative writing activities in any academic writing classroom.

Keywords: ESL teaching, motivation, teaching methods, academic writing , creative writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 438
3604 A Comparative Study of Self, Peer and Teacher Assessment Based on an English Writing Checklist

Authors: Xiaoting Shi, Xiaomei Ma

Abstract:

In higher education, students' self-assessment and peer assessment of compositions in writing classes can effectively improve their ability of evaluative judgment. However, students' self-assessment and peer assessment are not advocated by most teachers because of the significant difference in scoring compared with teacher assessment. This study used a multi-faceted Rasch model to explore whether an English writing checklist containing 30 descriptors can effectively improve rating consistency among self-assessment, peer assessment and teacher assessment. Meanwhile, a questionnaire was adopted to survey students’ and teachers’ attitudes toward self-assessment and peer assessment using the writing checklist. Results of the multi-faceted Rasch model analysis show that the writing checklist can effectively distinguish the students’ writing ability (separate coefficient = 2.05, separate reliability = 0.81, chi-square value (df = 32) = 123.4). Moreover, the results revealed that the checklist could improve rating consistency among self-assessment, peer assessment and teacher assessment. (separate coefficient = 1.71, separate reliability = 0.75, chi-square value (df=4) = 20.8). The results of the questionnaire showed that more than 85% of students and all teachers believed that the checklist had a good advantage in self-assessment and peer assessment, and they were willing to use the checklist to conduct self-assessment and peer assessment in class in the future.

Keywords: english writing, self-assessment, peer assessment, writing checklist

Procedia PDF Downloads 30
3603 Improving Graduate Student Writing Skills: Best Practices and Outcomes

Authors: Jamie Sundvall, Lisa Jennings

Abstract:

A decline in writing skills and abilities of students entering graduate school has become a focus for university systems within the United States. This decline has become a national trend that requires reflection on the intervention strategies used to address the deficit and unintended consequences as outcomes in the profession. Social work faculty is challenged to increase written scholarship within the academic setting. However, when a large number of students in each course have writing deficits, there is a shift from focus on content, ability to demonstrate competency, and application of core social work concepts. This qualitative study focuses on the experiences of online faculty who support increasing scholarship through writing and are following best practices preparing students academically to see improvements in written presentation in classroom work. This study outlines best practices to improve written academic presentation, especially in an online setting. The research also highlights how a student’s ability to show competency and application of concepts may be overlooked in the online setting. This can lead to new social workers who are prepared academically, but may unable to effectively advocate and document thought presentation in their writing. The intended progression of writing across all levels of higher education moves from summary, to application, and into abstract problem solving. Initial findings indicate that it is important to reflect on practices used to address writing deficits in terms of academic writing, competency, and application. It is equally important to reflect on how these methods of intervention impact a student post-graduation. Specifically, for faculty, it is valuable to assess a social worker’s ability to engage in continuity of documentation and advocacy at micro, mezzo, macro, and international levels of practice.

Keywords: intervention, professional impact, scholarship, writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 46
3602 Simplifying Writing Composition to Assist Students in Rural Areas: An Experimental Study for the Comparison of Guided and Unguided Instruction

Authors: Neha Toppo

Abstract:

Method and strategies of teaching instruction highly influence learning of students. In second language teaching, number of ways and methods has been suggested by different scholars and researchers through times. The present article deals with the role of teaching instruction in developing compositional ability of students in writing. It focuses on the secondary level students of rural areas, whose exposure to English language is limited and they face challenges even in simple compositions. The students till high school suffer with their disability in writing formal letter, application, essay, paragraph etc. They face problem in note making, writing answers in examination using their own words and depend fully on rote learning. It becomes difficult for them to give language to their own ideas. Teaching writing composition deserves special attention as writing is an integral part of language learning and students at this level are expected to have sound compositional ability for it is useful in numerous domains. Effective method of instruction could help students to learn expression of self, correct selection of vocabulary and grammar, contextual writing, composition of formal and informal writing. It is not limited to school but continues to be important in various other fields outside the school such as in newspaper and magazine, official work, legislative work, material writing, academic writing, personal writing, etc. The study is based on the experimental method, which hypothesize that guided instruction will be more effective in teaching writing compositions than usual instruction in which students are left to compose by their own without any help. In the test, students of one section are asked to write an essay on the given topic without guidance and another section are asked to write the same but with the assistance of guided instruction in which students have been provided with a few vocabulary and sentence structure. This process is repeated in few more schools to get generalize data. The study shows the difference on students’ performance using both the instructions; guided and unguided. The conclusion of the study is followed by the finding that writing skill of the students is quite poor but with the help of guided instruction they perform better. The students are in need of better teaching instruction to develop their writing skills.

Keywords: composition, essay, guided instruction, writing skill

Procedia PDF Downloads 185
3601 The Impact of Collaborative Writing through Wikis and Blogs on Iranian EFL Learners’ Writing Achievement

Authors: Farhad Ghorbandordinejad, Shamsoddin Aref

Abstract:

Wikis and blogs, defined as educational tools in line with the objectives of collaborative writing, are regarded as innovative ways of writing addressing the problems of conventional types of writing. Although writing in wikis and blogs step in different contexts, they are both aiming at betterment of collaborative writing procedures. It is believed that due to certain reasons bringing in wikis and blogs to learners' life can lead to better performance of writing. This study aimed at dipping into pedagogical aspects of wikis and blogs in the hope of eliminating prior traditional mistakes and bringing students together in a more constructive L2 context. To this end, three groups of intermediate students were experimented in three settings of wiki-group, blog-group and conventional (control) group. Despite conventional group learners, participants in both experimental groups experienced L2 writing in a new telecollaborative context. An achievement test was administered after the treatment to check learners’ degree of improvement in EFL writing. The results of this study provide a deep insight towards the effectiveness of writing in the contexts of wikis and blogs compared with conventional writing procedures. The overall conclusion drawn from the distinction of conventional writing, on one hand, and wikis and blogs, on the other hand, indicates that the latter channels of writing are more constructive for learners’ writing improvements.

Keywords: collaborative writing, wikis, blogs, writing achievement

Procedia PDF Downloads 290
3600 Discovering the Relationship between Teaching Creativity and Creative Writing in Pakistan

Authors: Humaira Irfan Khan

Abstract:

The paper explores teaching of creative writing in Pakistani classroom. The data collected from the questionnaire and focus group interview with a large public sector university’s Master of Arts in English students, who are also in-service school teachers, discovers that English teachers in Pakistan do not teach to develop the creative writing of pupils. The findings show that English teachers can define creative writing but are confused about strategies needed in rousing learners’ interest in creative writing. The teachers make their students memorise compositions from the textbooks to be reproduced in class. English teachers must be encouraged and trained to engage in activities that are essential for enhancing creative writing in schools.

Keywords: creative writing, teaching creative writing, textbooks, Pakistan

Procedia PDF Downloads 239
3599 Using Assessment Criteria as a Pedagogic Tool to Develop Argumentative Essay Writing

Authors: Sruti Akula

Abstract:

Assessment criteria are mostly used for assessing skills like writing and speaking. However, they could be used as a pedagogic tool to develop writing skills. A study was conducted with higher secondary learners (Class XII Kendriya Vidyalaya) to investigate the effectiveness of assessment criteria to develop argumentative essay writing. In order to raise awareness about the features of argumentative essay, assessment criteria were shared with the learners. Along with that, self-evaluation checklists were given to the learners to guide them through the writing process. During the study learners wrote multiple drafts with the help of assessment criteria, self-evaluation checklists and teacher feedback at different stages of their writing. It was observed that learners became more aware of the features of argumentative essay which in turn improved their argumentative essay writing. In addition the self evaluation checklists imporved their ability to reflect on their work there by increasing learner autonomy in the class. Hence, it can be claimed that both assessment criteria and self evaluation checklists are effective pedagogic tools to develop argumentative essay writing. Thus, teachers can be trained to create and use tools like assessment criteria and self-evaluation checklists to develop learners’ writing skills in an effective way. The presentation would discuss the approach adopted in the study to teach argumentative essay writing along with the rationale. The tools used in the study would be shared and the data collected in the form of written scripts, self-evaluation checklists and student interviews will be analyzed to validate the claims. Finally, the practical implication of the study like the ways of using assessment criteria and checklists to raise learner awareness and autonomy, using such tools to keep the learners informed about the task requirements and genre features, and the like will be put forward.

Keywords: argumentative essay writing, assessment criteria, self evaluation checklists, pedagogic

Procedia PDF Downloads 392
3598 Using Focused Free-Writing to Help English to Speakers of Other Languages Students Generate Ideas for Critical, Academic Writing

Authors: Ratnawati Mohd Asraf, Sabreena Ahmed

Abstract:

This paper describes how the method of focused freewriting can be used to help teachers to foster critical thinking through writing. In this study, we used focused freewriting during the pre-writing stage of our writing course to help our English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) students to generate ideas and to think critically about the issues they were to write on. In each of the four classes where we applied this technique, we used pictures or videos to stimulate their thinking during the prewriting stage of writing and then asked them to write non-stop for ten minutes about whatever that came to their minds as a result of being presented with these prompts. We then asked them to focus on the themes that emerged from their brief writing. Using observations, in-depth interviews, and an analysis of their brief essays, our study found that focused freewriting helped our students to generate ideas and think critically about the issues they were writing on. We postulate that by using focused freewriting and discussions during the prewriting stage of writing, instructors can help their students to think critically about various issues and facilitate their efforts at organising their arguments for critical, academic essays.

Keywords: academic writing, critical writing, critical thinking, focused free-writing, pre-writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 59
3597 Technology Impact in Learning and Teaching English Language Writing

Authors: Laura Naka

Abstract:

The invention of computer writing programs has changed the way of teaching second language writing. This artificial intelligence engine can provide students with feedback on their essays, on their grammatical and spelling errors, convenient writing and editing tools to facilitate student’s writing process. However, it is not yet proved if this technology is helping students to improve their writing skills. There are several programs that are of great assistance for students concerning their writing skills. New technology provides students with different software programs which enable them to be more creative, to express their opinions and ideas in words, pictures and sounds, but at the end main and most correct feedback should be given by their teachers. No matter how new technology affects in writing skills, always comes from their teachers. This research will try to present some of the advantages and disadvantages that new technology has in writing process for students. The research takes place in the University of Gjakova ‘’Fehmi Agani’’ Faculty of Education-Preschool Program. The research aims to provide random sample response by using questionnaires and observation.

Keywords: English language learning, technology, academic writing, teaching L2.

Procedia PDF Downloads 418
3596 Learners’ Reactions to Writing Activities in an Elementary Algebra Classroom

Authors: Early Sol A. Gadong, Lourdes C. Zamora, Jonny B. Pornel, Aurora Fe C. Bautista

Abstract:

Various research has shown that writing allows students to engage in metacognition and provides them with a venue to communicate their disposition towards what they are learning. However, few studies have explored students’ feelings about the incorporation of such writing activities in their mathematics classes. Through reflection sheets, group discussions, and interviews, this mixed-methods study explored students’ perceptions and insights on supplementary writing activities in their Elementary Algebra class. Findings revealed that while students generally have a positive regard for writing activities, they have conflicting views about how writing activities can help them in their learning. A big majority contend that writing activities can enhance the learning of mathematical content and attitudes towards mathematics if they allow students to explore and synthesize what they have learned and reflected on their emotional disposition towards mathematics. Also, gender does not appear to play a significant role in students’ reactions to writing activities.

Keywords: writing in math, metacognition, affective factors in learning, elementary algebra classroom

Procedia PDF Downloads 322
3595 Codifying the Creative Self: Conflicts of Theory and Content in Creative Writing

Authors: Danielle L. Iamarino

Abstract:

This paper explores the embattled territory of academic creative writing—and most focally, the use of critical theory in the teaching and structuring of creative practice. It places creative writing in contemporary social, cultural, and otherwise anthropological contexts, and evaluates conventional creative writing pedagogies based on how well they serve the updated needs of increasingly diverse student congregations. With continued emphasis on student-centered learning, this paper compares theoretical to practical applications of discipline-specific knowledge, examining and critiquing theory in terms of its relevance, accessibility, and whether or not it is both actionable and beneficial in the creative writing classroom.

Keywords: creative writing, literary theory, content, pedagogy, workshop, teaching

Procedia PDF Downloads 210
3594 Developing a Model of Teaching Writing Based On Reading Approach through Reflection Strategy for EFL Students of STKIP YPUP

Authors: Eny Syatriana, Ardiansyah

Abstract:

The purpose of recent study was to develop a learning model on writing, based on the reading texts which will be read by the students using reflection strategy. The strategy would allow the students to read the text and then they would write back the main idea and to develop the text by using their own sentences. So, the writing practice was begun by reading an interesting text, then the students would develop the text which has been read into their writing. The problem questions are (1) what kind of learning model that can develop the students writing ability? (2) what is the achievement of the students of STKIP YPUP through reflection strategy? (3) is the using of the strategy effective to develop students competence In writing? (4) in what level are the students interest toward the using of a strategy In writing subject? This development research consisted of some steps, they are (1) need analysis (2) model design (3) implementation (4) model evaluation. The need analysis was applied through discussion among the writing lecturers to create a learning model for writing subject. To see the effectiveness of the model, an experiment would be delivered for one class. The instrument and learning material would be validated by the experts. In every steps of material development, there was a learning process, where would be validated by an expert. The research used development design. These Principles and procedures or research design and development .This study, researcher would do need analysis, creating prototype, content validation, and limited empiric experiment to the sample. In each steps, there should be an assessment and revision to the drafts before continue to the next steps. The second year, the prototype would be tested empirically to four classes in STKIP YPUP for English department. Implementing the test greatly was done through the action research and followed by evaluation and validation from the experts.

Keywords: learning model, reflection, strategy, reading, writing, development

Procedia PDF Downloads 274
3593 Scholastic Ability and Achievement as Predictors of College Performance among Selected Second Year College Students at University of Perpetual Help System DALTA, Calamba

Authors: Shielilo R. Amihan, Ederliza De Jesus

Abstract:

The study determined the predictors of college performance of 2nd Yr students of UPHSD-Calamba. This quantitative study conducted a survey using the Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA), and the retrieval of entrance examinations results and current General Weighted Average (GWA) of the 242 randomly selected respondents. The mean, Pearson r and multiple regression analyses through SPSS revealed that students are capable of verbal, non-verbal and quantitative reasoning, reading vocabulary, comprehension, math calculation, and writing mechanics but have difficulty in math application and writing composition. The study found out the Scholastic Ability and Achievement, except in mathematics, are significantly related to college performance. It concludes that students with high ability and achievement may perform better in college. However, only English subset results in the entrance exam predicts the academic success of students in college while SATA and Math entrance exam results do not. The study recommends providing pre-college Math and Writing courses as requisites in college. It also suggests implementing formative curriculum-based enhancement programs on specific priority areas, profiling programs towards informed individual academic decision-making, revising the Entrance Examinations, monitoring the development of the students, and exploring other predictors of college academic performance such as non-cognitive factors.

Keywords: scholastic ability, scholastic achievement, entrance exam, college performance

Procedia PDF Downloads 154
3592 Positive Politeness in Writing Centre Consultations with an Emphasis on Praise

Authors: Avasha Rambiritch, Adelia Carstens

Abstract:

In especially the context of a writing center, learning takes place during, and as part of, the conversations between the writing center tutor and the student. This interaction or dialogue is an integral part of writing center research and is the focus of this largely qualitative study, employing a politeness lens. While there is some research on positive politeness strategies employed by writing center tutors, there is very little research on specifically praising as a positive politeness strategy. This study attempts to fill this gap by analyzing a corpus of 10 video-recorded consultations to determine how tutors in a writing center utilize the positive politeness strategy of praise. Findings indicate that while tutors exploit a range of politeness strategies, praise is used more often than any other strategy. The research indicates that praise as a politeness strategy is utilized significantly more when commenting on higher-order concerns, as in line with the writing center literature. The benefits of this study include insights into how such analyses can be used to better prepare and equip the tutors (usually postgraduate students appointed as part-time tutors in the writing center) for the work they do on a daily basis.

Keywords: writing center, academic writing, positive politeness, tutor

Procedia PDF Downloads 55
3591 The Application of Lesson Study Model in Writing Review Text in Junior High School

Authors: Sulastriningsih Djumingin

Abstract:

This study has some objectives. It aims at describing the ability of the second-grade students to write review text without applying the Lesson Study model at SMPN 18 Makassar. Second, it seeks to describe the ability of the second-grade students to write review text by applying the Lesson Study model at SMPN 18 Makassar. Third, it aims at testing the effectiveness of the Lesson Study model in writing review text at SMPN 18 Makassar. This research was true experimental design with posttest Only group design involving two groups consisting of one class of the control group and one class of the experimental group. The research populations were all the second-grade students at SMPN 18 Makassar amounted to 250 students consisting of 8 classes. The sampling technique was purposive sampling technique. The control class was VIII2 consisting of 30 students, while the experimental class was VIII8 consisting of 30 students. The research instruments were in the form of observation and tests. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques and inferential statistical techniques with t-test types processed using SPSS 21 for windows. The results shows that: (1) of 30 students in control class, there are only 14 (47%) students who get the score more than 7.5, categorized as inadequate; (2) in the experimental class, there are 26 (87%) students who obtain the score of 7.5, categorized as adequate; (3) the Lesson Study models is effective to be applied in writing review text. Based on the comparison of the ability of the control class and experimental class, it indicates that the value of t-count is greater than the value of t-table (2.411> 1.667). It means that the alternative hypothesis (H1) proposed by the researcher is accepted.

Keywords: application, lesson study, review text, writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 121
3590 Effectiveness of a Traits Cooperative Learning on Developing Writing Achievement and Composition among Teacher Candidates

Authors: Abdelaziz Hussien

Abstract:

This article reports investigations of a study into the effectiveness of a traits cooperative learning (TCL) on teacher candidates’ writing achievement, composition, and attitudes towards traits of writing approach and small group learning. Mixed methodologies were used with the participants in a repeated measures quasi-experimental design. Forty-two class teacher candidates, enrolled in the Bahrain Teachers College, completed the pre and post author-developed measures. The results suggest that TCL has a positive effect on the participants’ writing achievement, composition, and attitudes towards traits of writing approach, but not on the attitudes towards small group learning. Further implications to teacher education are presented.

Keywords: trait-based language education, cooperative learning, writing achievement, writing composition, traits of writing, teacher education

Procedia PDF Downloads 53
3589 Development of a Rating Scale for Elementary EFL Writing

Authors: Mohammed S. Assiri

Abstract:

In EFL programs, rating scales used in writing assessment are often constructed by intuition. Intuition-based scales tend to provide inaccurate and divisive ratings of learners’ writing performance. Hence, following an empirical approach, this study attempted to develop a rating scale for elementary-level writing at an EFL program in Saudi Arabia. Towards this goal, 98 students’ essays were scored and then coded using comprehensive taxonomy of writing constructs and their measures. An automatic linear modeling was run to find out which measures would best predict essay scores. A nonparametric ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis test, was then used to determine which measures could best differentiate among scoring levels. Findings indicated that there were certain measures that could serve as either good predictors of essay scores or differentiators among scoring levels, or both. The main conclusion was that a rating scale can be empirically developed using predictive and discriminative statistical tests.

Keywords: analytic scoring, rating scales, writing assessment, writing constructs, writing performance

Procedia PDF Downloads 356
3588 Design and Realization of Social Responsibility Report Writing System

Authors: Hao Qin

Abstract:

This paper proposes a guiding tool for companies to write social responsibility report by developing an applicable writing system based on analysis of its functional requirements, writing indicators and roles. The system’s operation and results concerned will be demonstrated as well.

Keywords: social responsibility, report writing, system, design and realization

Procedia PDF Downloads 270
3587 The Writing Eight Exercise and Its Impact on Kindergartners

Authors: Karima Merchant

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the Writing Eight Exercise, an exercise from the Brain Integration Therapy, with Kindergartners who are struggling with writing tasks in school. With the help of this exercise, children were able to cross the midline, an invisible line running from our brain to our feet, which separates the body’s right from left. Crossing the midline integrates the brain hemispheres, thus encouraging bilateral movement. The study was spread over 15 weeks where the children were required to do the Writing Eight Exercise 4 times a week. The data collection methods included observations, student work samples and feedback from teachers and parents. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that the Writing Eight Exercise had a positive impact on students’ approach towards writing tasks, letter formation, and fine motor skills.

Keywords: crossing the midline, fine motor skills, letter formation, writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 268
3586 Research Writing Anxiety among Engineering Postgraduate Students in Taiwan

Authors: Mei-Ching Ho

Abstract:

Graduate-level writing practices have gained increasing scholarly attention in recent years. Due to its discipline-specific conventions and requirements, research writing can cause various levels of anxiety for native English speaking and English as a second/foreign language (ESL/EFL) postgraduate students. Although many studies have investigated how writing anxiety can negatively affect writing performance, self-efficacy, and disciplinary discourse socialization process, relatively few have examined the impact of writing anxiety from the perspectives of postgraduate students in EFL contexts. This study aims to 1) examine the level of and the relationship between research writing anxiety and self-efficacy among Taiwanese EFL students at the master's and doctoral levels and 2) to uncover the causes of students' research writing anxiety. The data was collected from an adapted version of Second Language Writing Anxiety Inventory (SLWAI) and Research Writing Self-Efficacy Scale with 218 EFL graduate students in engineering-related fields at two research-oriented universities in Taiwan. A pilot study was conducted to ensure the construct and content validity of the instruments. Semi-structured interviews were also undertaken with 30 survey respondents to better understand the causes of their writing anxiety. The results revealed that while both master's and doctoral students had low to moderate research writing anxiety and self-efficacy, the doctoral students with more experiences in writing research papers in English were more anxious but not necessarily more confident than the master's students. A significantly weak negative correlation was found between the two constructs. The contributing factors for these results include different degree of writing exigency, perceived importance and types of writing tasks, writing for publication as graduation thresholds, and mentoring relationship with thesis/dissertation advisers. The study also identified several causes of graduate-level writing anxiety, of which writing under time constraints and concern on linguistic and rhetorical proficiency appeared to be the major concern. Pedagogical implications regarding facilitating graduate students' writing process and reducing anxiety will also be drawn.

Keywords: writing affect, writing anxiety, writing self-efficacy, EFL, postgraduate students

Procedia PDF Downloads 389
3585 Adopting a Comparative Cultural Studies Approach to Teaching Writing in the Global Classroom

Authors: Madhura Bandyopadhyay

Abstract:

Teaching writing within multicultural and multiethnic communities poses many unique challenges not the least of which is that of intercultural communication. When the writing is in English, pedagogical imperatives often encounter the universalizing tendencies of standardization of both language use and structural parameters which are often at odds with maintaining local practices which preserve cultural pluralism. English often becomes the contact zone within which individual identities of students play out against the standardization imperatives of the larger world. Writing classes can serve as places which become instruments of assimilation of ethnic minorities to a larger globalizing or nationalistic agenda. Hence, for those outside of the standard practices of writing English, adaptability towards a mastery of those practices valued as standard become the focus of teaching taking away from diversity of local English use and other modes of critical thinking. In a very multicultural and multiethnic context such as the US or Singapore, these dynamics become very important. This paper will argue that multiethnic writing classrooms can greatly benefit from taking up a cultural studies approach whereby the students’ lived environments and experiences are analyzed as cultural texts to produce writing. Such an approach eliminates limitations of using both literary texts as foci of discussion as in traditional approaches to teaching writing and the current trend in teaching composition without using texts at all. By bringing in students’ lived experiences into the classroom and analyzing them as cultural compositions stressing the ability to communicate across cultures, cultural competency is valued rather than adaptability while privileging pluralistic experiences as valuable even as universal shared experience are found. Specifically, while teaching writing in English in a multicultural classroom, a cultural studies approach makes both teacher and student aware of the diversity of the English language as it exists in our global context in the students’ experience while making space for diversity in critical thinking, structure and organization of writing effective in an intercultural context.

Keywords: English, multicultural, teaching, writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 373
3584 The Influence of Collaboration on Individual Writing Quality: The Case of Iranian vs. Malaysian Freshers

Authors: Seyed Yasin Yazdi-Amirkhiz, Azirah Hashim

Abstract:

This study purported to comparatively investigate the influence of collaborative writing on the quality of individual writing of four female Iranian and four female Malaysian students. The first semester students at a private university in Malaysia, who were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, study discipline, and language proficiency, were divided into two Iranian and two Malaysian dyads. The dyads performed collaborative writing tasks for 15 sessions; after three consecutive collaborative writing sessions, each participant was asked to individually attempt a writing task. Both collaborative and individual writing tasks comprised isomorphic graphic prompts (IELTS Academic Module task 1). Writing quality of the five individually-produced texts during the study was scored in terms of task achievement (TA), cohesion/coherence (C/C), grammatical range/accuracy (GR/A), and lexical resources (LR). The findings indicated a hierarchy of development in TA and C/C among all the students, while LR showed minor improvement only among three of Malaysian students, and GR/A barely exhibited any progress among all the participants. Intermittent progressions and regressions were also discerned in the trajectory of their writing development. The findings are discussed in the light of the socio-cultural and emergentist perspectives, the typology of tasks used as well as the role of the participants’ level of language proficiency.

Keywords: collaborative writing, writing quality, individual writing, collaboration

Procedia PDF Downloads 354
3583 Post-Secondary Faculty Treatment of Non-Native English-Speaking Student Writing Errors in Academic Subject Courses

Authors: Laura E. Monroe

Abstract:

As more non-native English-speaking students enroll in English-medium universities, even more faculty will instruct students who are unprepared for the rigors of post-secondary academic writing in English. Many faculty members lack training and knowledge regarding the assessment of non-native English-speaking students’ writing, as well as the ability to provide effective feedback. This quantitative study investigated the possible attitudinal factors, including demographics, which might affect faculty preparedness and grading practices for both native and non-native English-speaking students’ academic writing and plagiarism, as well as the reasons faculty do not deduct points from both populations’ writing errors. Structural equation modeling and SPSS Statistics were employed to analyze the results of a faculty questionnaire disseminated to individuals who had taught non-native English-speaking students in academic subject courses. The findings from this study illustrated that faculty’s native language, years taught, and institution type were significant factors in not deducting points for academic writing errors and plagiarism, and the major reasons for not deducting points for errors were that faculty had too many students to grade, not enough training in assessing student written errors and plagiarism and that the errors and plagiarism would have taken too long to explain. The practical implications gleaned from these results can be applied to most departments in English-medium post-secondary institutions regarding faculty preparedness and training in student academic writing errors and plagiarism, and recommendations for future research are given for similar types of preparation and guidance for post-secondary faculty, regardless of degree path or academic subject.

Keywords: assessment, faculty, non-native English-speaking students, writing

Procedia PDF Downloads 44
3582 Shakespeare’s Sister and the Crisis of Women’s Autonomy: A Critical Analysis of a Room of One’s Own

Authors: Ali Mohammadi

Abstract:

This study explored the root causes of women's lack of writing in literature by digging into Virginia Woolf's A Room of One’s Own. Virginia Woolf was the pioneer of feminist literary criticism in the 20th century. She was hugely preoccupied, throughout her writing life, with the role of women in history and with the relationship between women and fiction. Besides, she wrote continuously about the difficulties of women's writing and of writing as a woman. This research aims to mirror a number of key arguments concerning women’s issues: the social and economic conditions necessary for writing; the problem of a tradition of women's writing; the concept of a 'female sentence' articulating women's voices and values and the idea of the androgynous aesthetic in which an author would be able to write free from an awareness of their sex as male or female. Woolf was very wary of making any definitive assertions about women's writing, or at least in terms of its style or form. Indeed, much of the essay is taken up with her reflections on the lack of women's writing over the history of English literature. It was concluded that the reason for this absence of female writing does not just spring from the deficiency of genius, but of material circumstances and facilities. Additionally, the demands of the domestic household, the poverty of education available to women, and the laws that denied married women’s ownership of funds or property made it virtually impossible for women to take up writing as a profession.

Keywords: autonomy, facilities, genius, literature, women

Procedia PDF Downloads 38
3581 A Practical Guide to Collaborative Writing Assignments as a Pedagogical Technique in Higher Education Implemented in an Economics Course

Authors: Bahia Braktia, Belkacem Braktia

Abstract:

Collaborative writing is now an established pedagogical technique in higher education. Since most educators do not have training in the design, execution, and evaluation of writing assignments, implementing such tasks has proven difficult. This paper firstly proposes a framework for a collaborative writing assignment based on a literature study and adopting a writing-to-learn concept. It then describes the research undertaken and shows how this framework is implemented in an economics course, at an Algerian university, with undergraduate students. Finally, using a mixed methods design, it examines the students’ perceptions of what they have learned about collaborative writing. Preliminary results show that group assignments will always be a challenge, but with careful planning and structure, a collaborative writing assignment can be used effectively to help students improve their analytical and critical thinking abilities, research and group work skills, as well as writing proficiency. Students have a positive experience of working in a team and identified a wide variety of different team skills that they have learned through the process.

Keywords: collaborative writing, research assignment, students’ perception, survey

Procedia PDF Downloads 80
3580 Using Blackboard to Enhance Academic Writing Classes

Authors: Laurence Craven

Abstract:

Academic writing is one of the most important class a freshman will take, as it provides the skill needed to formulate an academic essay in any discipline. Written assignments are the most common form of assessment in higher education and thus it is of paramount importance for students to master the skill of academic writing. This presentation aims to give practitioners multiple ways to enhance their academic writing classes using the Blackboard environment, with a view to improving student performance. The presentation will include ways to improve assessment and give corrective feedback. It will also provide ideas on how to increase variety in teaching lessons, assigning homework and on organizing materials.

Keywords: academic writing, assessment, e-learning, technology

Procedia PDF Downloads 234
3579 Determining the Number of Words Required to Fulfil the Writing Task in an English Proficiency Exam with the Raters’ Scores

Authors: Defne Akinci Midas

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the minimum, and maximum number of words that would be sufficient to fulfill the writing task in the local English Proficiency Exam (EPE) produced and administered at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. The relationship between the number of words and the scores of the written products that had been awarded by two raters in three online EPEs administered in 2020 was examined. The means, standard deviations, percentages, range, minimum and maximum scores as well as correlations of the scores awarded to written products with the words that amount to 0-50, 51-100, 101-150, 151-200, 201-250, 251-300, and so on were computed. The results showed that the raters did not award a full score to texts that had fewer than 100 words. Moreover, the texts that had around 200 words were awarded the highest scores. The highest number of words that earned the highest scores was about 225, and from then onwards, the scores were either stable or lower. A positive low to moderate correlation was found between the number of words and scores awarded to the texts. We understand that the idea of ‘the longer, the better’ did not apply here. The results also showed that words between 101 to about 225 were sufficient to fulfill the writing task to fully display writing skills and language ability in the specific case of this exam.

Keywords: English proficiency exam, number of words, scoring, writing task

Procedia PDF Downloads 29