Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2671

Search results for: student motivation

2671 Student Learning and Motivation in an Interculturally Inclusive Classroom

Authors: Jonathan H. Westover, Jacque P. Westover, Maureen S. Andrade

Abstract:

Though learning theories vary in complexity and usefulness, a thorough understanding of foundational learning theories is a necessity in today’s educational environment. Additionally, learning theories lead to approaches in instruction that can affect student motivation and learning. The combination of a learning theory and elements to enhance student motivation can create a learning context where the student can thrive in their educational pursuits. This paper will provide an overview of three main learning theories: (1) Behavioral Theory, (2) Cognitive Theory, and (3) Constructivist Theory and explore their connection to elements of student learning motivation. Finally, we apply these learning theories and elements of student motivation to the following two context: (1) The FastStart Program at the Community College of Denver, and (2) An Online Academic English Language Course. We discussed potential of the program and course to have success in increasing student success outcomes.

Keywords: learning theory, student motivation, inclusive pedagogy, developmental education

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2670 Academic Motivation Maintenance for Students While Solving Mathematical Problems in the Middle School

Authors: M. Rodionov, Z. Dedovets

Abstract:

The level and type of student academic motivation are the key factors in their development and determine the effectiveness of their education. Improving motivation is very important with regard to courses on middle school mathematics. This article examines the general position regarding the practice of academic motivation. It also examines the particular features of mathematical problem solving in a school setting.

Keywords: teaching strategy, mathematics, motivation, student

Procedia PDF Downloads 383
2669 Teacher-Student Relationship and Achievement in Chinese: Potential Mediating Effects of Motivation

Authors: Yuan Liu, Hongyun Liu

Abstract:

Teacher-student relationship plays an important role on facilitating students’ learning behavior, school engagement, and academic outcomes. It is believed that good relationship will enhance the human agency—the intrinsic motivation—mainly through the strengthening of autonomic support, feeling of relatedness, and the individual’s competence to increase the academic outcomes. This is in line with self-determination theory (SDT), which generally views that the intrinsic motivation imbedded with human basic needs is one of the most important factors that would lead to better school engagement, academic outcomes, and well-being. Based on SDT, the present study explored the relation of among teacher-student relationship (teacher’s encouragement, respect), students’ motivation (extrinsic and intrinsic), and achievement outcomes. The study was based on a large scale academic assessment and questionnaire survey conducted by the Center for Assessment and Improvement of Basic Education Quality in Mainland China (2013) on Grade 8 students. The results indicated that intrinsic motivation mediated the relation between teacher-student relationship and academic achievement outcomes.

Keywords: teacher-student relationship, intrinsic motivation, academic achievement, mediation

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2668 Rural School English Teacher Motivational Practice on Facilitating Student Motivation

Authors: Hsiao-Wen Hsu

Abstract:

It is generally believed that the teacher’s use of motivational strategies can enhance student motivation, especially in a place like Taiwan where teacher usually dominates student EFL learning. However, only little empirical studies support this claim. This study examined the connection between teachers’ use of motivational teaching practice and observed student motivated behavior in rural junior high schools in Taiwan. The use of motivational strategies by 12 teachers in five recognized rural junior high schools was investigated observed using a classroom observation instrument, the Motivation Orientation of Language Teaching. Meanwhile, post-lesson teacher evaluations accomplished by both the researcher and the teacher were functioning as part of the measure of teacher motivational practice. The data collected through observation scheme follows the real-time coding principle to examine observable teacher motivational practice and learner motivated behaviors. The results support the previous research findings that teachers’ use of motivational strategies is associated with the student motivated behaviors as well as the students’ level of motivation regarding English learning.

Keywords: English learning, motivational strategies, student motivation, teacher motivational practices

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2667 Surveying the Effects of Online Learning On High School Student’s Motivation: A Case Study of Pinewood School

Authors: Robert Cui

Abstract:

COVID-19 has drastically changed the way students interact and engage with their environments. Students, in particular, have been forced to change from in-person to online learning. How can we ensure that students continue to remain motivated even as their mode of education transitions to online learning? In this study conducted on high school students from a small private school (n = 50), we investigate the factors that predict student motivation during online learning. Using the framework of self-determination theory, we examine the three facets of student motivation during online learning: engagement, autonomy, and competence. We find that students' perception of their peers' engagement with the curriculum, feelings of parental academic expectations, perceptions of favoritism by the teacher, and perceived clarity of instruction given by the teacher all predict student engagement in online learning. Student autonomy is predicted by the amount of parental control a student feels, the clarity of instruction given by the teacher, and also the amount to which a student is perceiving their peers to be paying attention. Finally, competence is predicted by favoritism a student perceives from a teacher and also the amount of which a student is perceiving their peers to be paying attention. Based on these findings, we provide insights on how three important stakeholders –parents, teachers, and peers can enhance students' motivation during online learning.

Keywords: academic performance, motivation, online learning, parental influence, teacher, peers

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2666 The Formation of Motivational Sphere for Learning Activity under Conditions of Change of One of Its Leading Components

Authors: M. Rodionov, Z. Dedovets

Abstract:

This article discusses ways to implement a differentiated approach to developing academic motivation for mathematical studies which relies on defining the primary structural characteristics of motivation. The following characteristics are considered: features of realization of cognitive activity, meaning-making characteristics, level of generalization and consistency of knowledge acquired by personal experience. The assessment of the present level of individual student understanding of each component of academic motivation is the basis for defining the relevant educational strategy for its further development.

Keywords: learning activity, mathematics, motivation, student

Procedia PDF Downloads 353
2665 Effects of Gamification on Lower Secondary School Students’ Motivation and Engagement

Authors: Goh Yung Hong, Mona Masood

Abstract:

This paper explores the effects of gamification on lower secondary school students’ motivation and engagement in the classroom. Two-group posttest-only experimental design were employed to study the influence of gamification teaching method (GTM) when compared with conventional teaching method (CTM) on 60 lower secondary school students. The Student Engagement Instrument (SEI) and Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) were used to assess students’ intrinsic motivation and engagement level towards the respective teaching method. Finding indicates that students who completed the GTM lesson were significantly higher in intrinsic motivation to learn than those from the CTM. Although the result were insignificant and only marginal difference in the engagement mean, GTM still show better potential in raising student’s engagement in class when compared with CTM. This finding proves that the GTM is likely to solve the current issue of low motivation to learn and low engagement in class among lower secondary school students in Malaysia. On the other hand, despite being not significant, higher mean indicates that CTM positively contribute to higher peer support for learning and better teacher and student relationship when compared with GTM. As a conclusion, gamification approach is flexible and can be adapted into many learning content to enhance the intrinsic motivation to learn and to some extent, encourage better student engagement in class.

Keywords: conventional teaching method, gamification teaching method, motivation, engagement

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2664 The Student Care: The Influence of Family’s Attention toward the Student of Junior High Schools in Physics Learning Achievements

Authors: Siti Rossidatul Munawaroh, Siti Khusnul Khowatim

Abstract:

This study is determined to find how is the influence of family attention of students in provides guidance of the student learning. The increasing of student’s learning motivation can be increased made up in various ways, one of them are through students social guidance in their relation with the family. The family not only provides the matter and the learning time but also be supervise for the learning time and guide his children to overcome a learning disability. The character of physics subject in their science experiences at junior high schools has demanded that student’s ability is to think symbolically and understand something in a meaningful manner. Therefore, the reinforcement of the physics learning motivation is clearly necessary not only by the school are related, but the family environment and the society. As for the role of family which includes maintenance, parenting, coaching, and educating both of physically and spiritually, this way is expected to give spirit impulsion in studying physics subject in order to increase student learning achievements.

Keywords: physics subject, the influence of family attention, learning motivation, the Student care

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2663 Predictive Power of Achievement Motivation on Student Engagement and Collaborative Problem Solving Skills

Authors: Theresa Marie Miller, Ma. Nympha Joaquin

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to check the predictive power of social-oriented and individual-oriented achievement motivation on student engagement and collaborative problem-solving skills in mathematics. A sample of 277 fourth year high school students from the Philippines were selected. Surveys and videos of collaborative problem solving activity were used to collect data from respondents. The mathematics teachers of the participants were interviewed to provide qualitative support on the data. Systemaitc correlation and regression analysis were employed. Results of the study showed that achievement motivations−SOAM and IOAM− linearly predicted student engagement but was not significantly associated to the collaborative problem-solving skills in mathematics. Student engagement correlated positively with collaborative problem-solving skills in mathematics. The results contribute to theorizing about the predictive power of achievement motivations, SOAM and IOAM on the realm of academic behaviors and outcomes as well as extend the understanding of collaborative problem-solving skills of 21st century learners.

Keywords: achievement motivation, collaborative problem-solving skills, individual-oriented achievement motivation, social-oriented achievement motivation, student engagement

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2662 Physics Motivation and Research: Understanding the 21st Century Learners of Today

Authors: Von Anthony G. Torio

Abstract:

Motivation and research are significant determinants of a student’s success in the school and in future careers. This study aimed to give a picture of the physics motivation of students in a tertiary level institution, as well as their research area and working preference, to create a picture of the nature of the representative youths of today. It was found that male students have higher motivation than female students in all components of motivation with intrinsic motivation leading the six components of motivation. In addition, male students (M = 4.27; SD = 0.74) were found to have significantly higher motivation as compared to female students (M = 3.77; SD = 0.89) with a computed t(64) value of 2.41 with p < 0.05 and Cohen’s d of 0.61. The students’ preference to work in groups of three rather than working individually suggests that students of the batch have small working groups that they depend on rather than working alone. The majority of the students also preferred conducting studies on the social sciences.

Keywords: motivation, physics, research, physics motivation, physics education, Philippines

Procedia PDF Downloads 327
2661 Motivation in Online Instruction

Authors: David Whitehouse

Abstract:

Some of the strengths of online teaching include flexibility, creativity, and comprehensiveness. A challenge can be motivation. How can an instructor repeating the same lessons over and over, day in and day out, year after year, maintain motivation? Enthusiasm? Does motivating the student and creating enthusiasm in class build the same things inside the instructor? The answers lie in the adoption of what I label EUQ—The Empathy and Understanding Quotient. In the online environment, students who are adults have many demands on their time: civilian careers, families (spouse, children, older parents), and sometimes even military service. Empathetic responses on the part of the instructor will lead to open and honest communication on the part of the student, which will lead to understanding on the part of the instructor and a rise in motivation in both parties. Understanding the demands can inform an instructor’s relationship with the student throughout the temporal parameters of classwork. In practicing EUQ, instructors can build motivation in their students and find internal motivation in an enhanced classroom dynamic. The presentation will look at what motivates a student to accomplish more than the minimum required and how that can lead to excellent results for an instructor’s own motivation. Through direct experience of having students give high marks on post-class surveys and via direct messaging, the presentation will focus on how applying EUQ in granting extra time, searching for intent while grading, communicating with students via Quick Notes, responses in Forums, comments in Assignments, and comments in grading areas - - - how applying these things infuses enthusiasm and energy in the instructor which drive creativity in teaching. Three primary ways of communicating with students will be given as examples. The positive response and negative response each for a Forum, an Assignment, and a Message will be explored. If there is time, participants will be invited to craft their own EUQ responses in a role playing exercise involving two common classroom scenarios—late work and plagiarism.

Keywords: education, instruction, motivation, online, teaching

Procedia PDF Downloads 94
2660 The Impact of Teacher's Emotional Intelligence on Students' Motivation to Learn

Authors: Marla Wendy Spergel

Abstract:

The purpose of this qualitative study is to showcase graduated high school students’ to voice on the impact past teachers had on their motivation to learn, and if this impact has affected their post-high-school lives. Through a focus group strategy, 21 graduated high school alumni participated in three separate focus groups. Participants discussed their former teacher’s emotional intelligence skills, which influenced their motivation to learn or not. A focused review of the literature revealed that teachers are a major factor in a student’s motivation to learn. This research was guided by Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory of Motivation and constructs related to learning and motivation from Carl Rogers’ Humanistic Views of Personality, and from Brain-Based Learning perspectives with a major focus on the area of Emotional Intelligence. Findings revealed that the majority of participants identified teachers who most motivated them to learn and demonstrated skills associated with emotional intelligence. An important and disturbing finding relates to the saliency of negative experiences. Further work is recommended to expand this line of study in Higher Education, perform a long-term study to better gain insight into long-term benefits attributable to experiencing positive teachers, study the negative impact teachers have on students’ motivation to learn, specifically focusing on student anxiety and acquired helplessness.

Keywords: emotional intelligence, learning, motivation, pedagogy

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2659 Student-Created Videos to Foster Active Learning in Heat Transfer Course

Authors: W.Appamana, S. Jantasee, P. Siwarasak, T. Mueansichai, C. Kaewbuddee

Abstract:

Heat transfer is important in chemical engineering field. We have to know how to predict rates of heat transfer in a variety of process situations. Therefore, heat transfer learning is one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. To enhance student learning in classroom, active-learning method was proposed in a single classroom, using problems based on videos and creating video, think-pair-share and jigsaw technique. The result shows that active learning method can prevent copying of the solutions manual for students and improve average examination scores about 5% when comparing with students in traditional section. Overall, this project represents an effective type of class that motivates student-centric learning while enhancing self-motivation, creative thinking and critical analysis among students.

Keywords: active learning, student-created video, self-motivation, creative thinking

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2658 Mobile Games Applications Android-Based Physics Education to Improve Student Motivation and Interest in Learning Physics

Authors: Rizky Dwi A, Mikha Herlina Pi

Abstract:

Physics lessons for high school students, especially in Indonesia is less desirable because many people believe that physics is very difficult, especially the development of increasingly sophisticated era make online gaming more attractive many people especially school children with a variety of increasingly sophisticated gadgets. Therefore, if those two things combined to attract students in physics, the physics-based educational game android can motivate students' interest and understanding of the physics because while playing, they can also learn physics.

Keywords: education, game physics, interest, student's motivation

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2657 The Effect of Teaching Science Strategies Curriculum and Evaluating on Developing the Efficiency of Academic Self in Science and the Teaching Motivation for the Student Teachers of the Primary Years

Authors: Amani M. Al-Hussan

Abstract:

The current study aimed to explore the effects of science teaching strategies course (CURR422) on developing academic self efficacy and motivation towards teaching it in female primary classroom teachers in College of Education in Princess Nora Bint AbdulRahman University. The study sample consisted (48) female student teachers. To achieve the study aims, the researcher designed two instruments: Academic Self Efficacy Scale & Motivation towards Teaching Science Scale while maintaining the validity and reliability of these instruments.. Several statistical procedures were conducted i.e. Independent Sample T-test, Eta Square, Cohen D effect size. The results reveal that there were statistically significant differences between means of pre and post test for the sample in favor of post test. For academic self efficacy scale, Eta square was 0.99 and the effect size was 27.26. While for the motivation towards teaching science scale, Eta was 0.99 and the effect size was 51.72. These results indicated high effects of independent variable on the dependent variable.

Keywords: academic self efficiency, achievement, motivation, primary classroom teacher, science teaching strategies course, evaluation

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2656 Impact of Financial and Non-Financial Motivation on Motivating Employees

Authors: Al-Yaqdhan Al-Rawahi, Kaneez Fatima Sadriwala

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to discover the readiness of Civil Service Employee Pension Fund (CSEPF), a governmental organization, in motivating its staff. Exploratory survey has been conducted in order to extract needed information. For this purpose we proposed a questionnaire to understand staff viewpoint of motivation. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 15.0 for Windowsand Excel. Major results prove that good working conditions is the most important factor of staff and sympathetic help with personal problem is the least important one. Also the relationship between financial motivation and employee motivation is very weak, whereas with non-financial motivation and employee motivation is moderate. Future research may focus on studying all departments of CSEPF.

Keywords: financial motivation, non-financial motivation, employee motivation

Procedia PDF Downloads 307
2655 The Interactions among Motivation, Persistence, and Learning Abilities as They Relate to Academic Outcomes in Children

Authors: Rachelle M. Johnson, Jenna E. Finch

Abstract:

Motivation, persistence, and learning disability status are all associated with academic performance, but to the author's knowledge, little research has been done on how these variables interact with one another and how that interaction looks different within children with and without learning disabilities. The present study's goal was to examine the role motivation and persistence play in the academic success of children with learning disabilities and how these variables interact. Measurements were made using surveys and direct cognitive assessments on each child. Analyses were run on student's scores in motivation, persistence, and ability to learn compared to other fifth grade students. In this study, learning ability was intended as a proxy for learning disabilities (LDs). This study included a nationally representative sample of over 8,000 fifth-grade children from across the United States. Multiple interactions were found among these variables of motivation, persistence, and motivation as they relate to academic achievement. The major finding of the study was the significant role motivation played in academic achievement. This study shows the importance of measuring the within-group. One key finding was that motivation was associated with academic success and was moderated by the other variables. The interaction results were different for math and reading outcomes, suggesting that reading and math success are different and should be addressed differently. This study shows the importance of measuring the within-group differences in levels of motivation to better understand the academic success of children with and without learning disabilities. This study's findings call for further investigation into motivation and the possible need for motivational intervention for students, especially those with learning disabilities

Keywords: academic achievement, learning disabilities, motivation, persistence

Procedia PDF Downloads 53
2654 The Negative Effects of Controlled Motivation on Mathematics Achievement

Authors: John E. Boberg, Steven J. Bourgeois

Abstract:

The decline in student engagement and motivation through the middle years is well documented and clearly associated with a decline in mathematics achievement that persists through high school. To combat this trend and, very often, to meet high-stakes accountability standards, a growing number of parents, teachers, and schools have implemented various methods to incentivize learning. However, according to Self-Determination Theory, forms of incentivized learning such as public praise, tangible rewards, or threats of punishment tend to undermine intrinsic motivation and learning. By focusing on external forms of motivation that thwart autonomy in children, adults also potentially threaten relatedness measures such as trust and emotional engagement. Furthermore, these controlling motivational techniques tend to promote shallow forms of cognitive engagement at the expense of more effective deep processing strategies. Therefore, any short-term gains in apparent engagement or test scores are overshadowed by long-term diminished motivation, resulting in inauthentic approaches to learning and lower achievement. The current study focuses on the relationships between student trust, engagement, and motivation during these crucial years as students transition from elementary to middle school. In order to test the effects of controlled motivational techniques on achievement in mathematics, this quantitative study was conducted on a convenience sample of 22 elementary and middle schools from a single public charter school district in the south-central United States. The study employed multi-source data from students (N = 1,054), parents (N = 7,166), and teachers (N = 356), along with student achievement data and contextual campus variables. Cross-sectional questionnaires were used to measure the students’ self-regulated learning, emotional and cognitive engagement, and trust in teachers. Parents responded to a single item on incentivizing the academic performance of their child, and teachers responded to a series of questions about their acceptance of various incentive strategies. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to evaluate model fit and analyze the direct and indirect effects of the predictor variables on achievement. Although a student’s trust in teacher positively predicted both emotional and cognitive engagement, none of these three predictors accounted for any variance in achievement in mathematics. The parents’ use of incentives, on the other hand, predicted a student’s perception of his or her controlled motivation, and these two variables had significant negative effects on achievement. While controlled motivation had the greatest effects on achievement, parental incentives demonstrated both direct and indirect effects on achievement through the students’ self-reported controlled motivation. Comparing upper elementary student data with middle-school student data revealed that controlling forms of motivation may be taking their toll on student trust and engagement over time. While parental incentives positively predicted both cognitive and emotional engagement in the younger sub-group, such forms of controlling motivation negatively predicted both trust in teachers and emotional engagement in the middle-school sub-group. These findings support the claims, posited by Self-Determination Theory, about the dangers of incentivizing learning. Short-term gains belie the underlying damage to motivational processes that lead to decreased intrinsic motivation and achievement. Such practices also appear to thwart basic human needs such as relatedness.

Keywords: controlled motivation, student engagement, incentivized learning, mathematics achievement, self-determination theory, student trust

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2653 Characterization of the Music Admission Requirements and Evaluation of the Relationship among Motivation and Performance Achievement

Authors: Antonio M. Oliveira, Patricia Oliveira-Silva, Jose Matias Alves, Gary McPherson

Abstract:

The music teaching is oriented towards offering formal music training. Due to its specificities, this vocational program starts at a very young age. Although provided by the State, the offer is limited to 6 schools throughout the country, which means that the vacancies for prospective students are very limited every year. It is therefore crucial that these vacancies be taken by especially motivated children grown within households that offer the ideal setting for success. Some of the instruments used to evaluate musical performance are highly sensitive to specific previous training, what represents a severe validity problem for testing children who have had restricted opportunities for formal training. Moreover, these practices may be unfair because, for instance, they may not reflect the candidates’ music aptitudes. Based on what constitutes a prerequisite for making an excellent music student, researchers in this field have long argued that motivation, task commitment, and parents’ support are as important as ability. Thus, the aim of this study is: (1) to prepare an inventory of admission requirements in Australia, Portugal and Ireland; (2) to examine whether the candidates to music conservatories and parents’ level of motivation, assessed at three evaluation points (i.e., admission, at the end of the first year, and at the end of the second year), correlates positively with the candidates’ progress in learning a musical instrument (i.e., whether motivation at the admission may predict student musicianship); (3) an adaptation of an existing instrument to assess the motivation (i.e., to adapt the items to the music setting, focusing on the motivation for playing a musical instrument). The inclusion criteria are: only children registered in the administrative services to be evaluated for entrance to the conservatory will be accepted for this study. The expected number of participants is fifty (5-6 years old) in all the three frequency schemes: integrated, articulated and supplementary. Revisiting musical admission procedures is of particular importance and relevance to musical education because this debate may bring guidance and assistance about the needed improvement to make the process of admission fairer and more transparent.

Keywords: music learning, music admission requirements, student’s motivation, parent’s motivation

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2652 Integrating Student Engagement Activities into the Learning Process

Authors: Yingjin Cui, Xue Bai, Serena Reese

Abstract:

Student engagement and student interest during class instruction are important conditions for active learning. Engagement, which has an important relationship with learning motivation, influences students' levels of persistence in overcoming challenges. Lack of student engagement and absence from face-to-face lectures and tutorials, in turn, can lead to poor academic performance. However, keeping students motivated and engaged in the learning process in different instructional modes poses a significant challenge; students can easily become discouraged from attending lectures and tutorials across both online and face-to-face settings. Many factors impact students’ engagement in the learning process. If you want to keep students focused on learning, you have to invite them into the process of helping themselves by providing an active learning environment. Active learning is an excellent technique for enhancing student engagement and participation in the learning process because it provides means to motivate the student to engage themselves in the learning process through reflection, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing the material they learn during class. In this study, we discussed how to create an active learning class (both face-to-face and synchronous online) through engagement activities, including reflection, collaboration, screen messages, open poll, tournament, and transferring editing roles. These activities will provide an uncommon interactive learning environment that can result in improved learning outcomes. To evaluate the effectiveness of those engagement activities in the learning process, an experimental group and a control group will be explored in the study.

Keywords: active learning, academic performance, engagement activities, learning motivation

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2651 Learning Object Interface Adapted to the Learner's Learning Style

Authors: Zenaide Carvalho da Silva, Leandro Rodrigues Ferreira, Andrey Ricardo Pimentel

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Learning styles (LS) refer to the ways and forms that the student prefers to learn in the teaching and learning process. Each student has their own way of receiving and processing information throughout the learning process. Therefore, knowing their LS is important to better understand their individual learning preferences, and also, understand why the use of some teaching methods and techniques give better results with some students, while others it does not. We believe that knowledge of these styles enables the possibility of making propositions for teaching; thus, reorganizing teaching methods and techniques in order to allow learning that is adapted to the individual needs of the student. Adapting learning would be possible through the creation of online educational resources adapted to the style of the student. In this context, this article presents the structure of a learning object interface adaptation based on the LS. The structure created should enable the creation of the adapted learning object according to the student's LS and contributes to the increase of student’s motivation in the use of a learning object as an educational resource.

Keywords: adaptation, interface, learning object, learning style

Procedia PDF Downloads 308
2650 A Gamification Teaching Method for Software Measurement Process

Authors: Lennon Furtado, Sandro Oliveira

Abstract:

The importance of an effective measurement program lies in the ability to control and predict what can be measured. Thus, the measurement program has the capacity to provide bases in decision-making to support the interests of an organization. Therefore, it is only possible to apply for an effective measurement program with a team of software engineers well trained in the measurement area. However, the literature indicates that are few computer science courses that have in their program the teaching of the software measurement process. And even these, generally present only basic theoretical concepts of said process and little or no measurement in practice, which results in the student's lack of motivation to learn the measurement process. In this context, according to some experts in software process improvements, one of the most used approaches to maintaining the motivation and commitment to software process improvements program is the use of the gamification. Therefore, this paper aims to present a proposal of teaching the measurement process by gamification. Which seeks to improve student motivation and performance in the assimilation of tasks related to software measurement, by incorporating elements of games into the practice of measurement process, making it more attractive for learning. And as a way of validating the proposal will be made a comparison between two distinct groups of 20 students of Software Quality class, a control group, and an experiment group. The control group will be the students that will not make use of the gamification proposal to learn software measurement process, while the experiment group, will be the students that will make use of the gamification proposal to learn software measurement process. Thus, this paper will analyze the objective and subjective results of each group. And as objective result will be analyzed the student grade reached at the end of the course, and as subjective results will be analyzed a post-course questionnaire with the opinion of each student about the teaching method. Finally, this paper aims to prove or refute the following hypothesis: If the gamification proposal to teach software measurement process does appropriate motivate the student, in order to attribute the necessary competence to the practical application of the measurement process.

Keywords: education, gamification, software measurement process, software engineering

Procedia PDF Downloads 229
2649 The Impact of Using Microlearning to Enhance Students' Programming Skills and Learning Motivation

Authors: Ali Alqarni

Abstract:

This study aims to explore the impact of microlearning on the development of the programming skills as well as on the motivation for learning of first-year high schoolers in Jeddah. The sample consists of 78 students, distributed as 40 students in the control group, and 38 students in the treatment group. The quasi-experimental method, which is a type of quantitative method, was used in this study. In addition to the technological tools used to create and deliver the digital content, the study utilized two tools to collect the data: first, an observation card containing a list of programming skills, and second, a tool to measure the student's motivation for learning. The findings indicate that microlearning positively impacts programming skills and learning motivation for students. The study, then, recommends implementing and expanding the use of microlearning in educational contexts both in the general education level and the higher education level.

Keywords: educational technology, teaching strategies, online learning, microlearning

Procedia PDF Downloads 60
2648 Understanding Sixteen Basic Desires and Modern Approaches to Agile Team Motivation: Case Study

Authors: Anna Suvorova

Abstract:

Classical motivation theories hold that there are two kinds of motivation, intrinsic and extrinsic. Leaders are looking for effective motivation techniques, but frequently external influences do not work or, even worse, reduce team productivity. We see only the tip of the iceberg -human behavior. However, beneath the surface of the water are factors that directly affect our behavior -desires. Believing that employees need to be motivated, companies design a motivation system based on the principle: do it and get a reward. As a matter of fact, we all have basic desires. Everybody is motivated but to different extents. Following the principle "intrinsic motivation over extrinsic rewards", we need to create an environment that will support intrinsic motivation and potential of employees, and team, rather than individual work.

Keywords: motivation profile, motivation techniques, agile HR, basic desires, agile people, human behavior, people management

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2647 Language Learning Motivation in Mozambique: A Quantitative Study of University Students

Authors: Simao E. Luis

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From the 1960s to the 1990s, the social-psychological framework of language attitudes that emerged from the Canadian research tradition was very influential. Integrativeness was one of the main variables in Gardner’s theory because refugees and immigrants were motivated to learn English and French to integrate into the Canadian community. Second language (L2) scholars have expressed concerns over integrativeness because it cannot explain the motivation of L2 learners in global contexts. This study aims to investigate student motivation to learn English as a foreign language in Mozambique, and to contribute to the ongoing validation of the L2 Motivational Self System theory in an under-researched country. One hundred thirty-seven (N=137) university students completed a well-established motivation questionnaire. The data were analyzed with SPSS, and descriptive statistics, correlations, multiple regressions, and MANOVA were conducted. Results show that many variables contribute to motivated learning behavior, particularly the L2 learning experience and attitudes towards the English language. Statistically significant differences were found between males and females, with males expressing more motivation to learn the English language for personal interests. Statistically significant differences were found between older and younger students, with older students reporting more vivid images of themselves as future English language users. These findings have pedagogical implications because motivational strategies are positively correlated with student motivated learning behavior. Therefore, teachers should design L2 tasks that can help students to develop their future L2 selves.

Keywords: English as a foreign language, L2 motivational self system, Mozambique, university students

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2646 Effect of Facilitation in a Problem-Based Environment on the Metacognition, Motivation and Self-Directed Learning in Nursing: A Quasi-Experimental Study among Nurse Students in Tanzania

Authors: Walter M. Millanzi, Stephen M. Kibusi

Abstract:

Background: Currently, there has been a progressive shortage not only to the number but also the quality of medical practitioners for the most of nursing. Despite that, those who are present exhibit unethical and illegal practices, under standard care and malpractices. The concern is raised in the ways they are prepared, or there might be something missing in nursing curricula or how it is delivered. There is a need for transforming or testing new teaching modalities to enhance competent health workforces. Objective: to investigate the Effect of Facilitation in a Problem-based Environment (FPBE) on metacognition, self-directed learning and learning motivation to undergraduate nurse student in Tanzanian higher learning institutions. Methods: quasi-experimental study (quantitative research approach). A purposive sampling technique was employed to select institutions and achieving a sample size of 401 participants (interventional = 134 and control = 267). Self-administered semi-structured questionnaire; was the main data collection methods and the Statistical Package for Service Solution (v. 20) software program was used for data entry, data analysis, and presentations. Results: The pre-post test results between groups indicated noticeably significant change on metacognition in an intervention (M = 1.52, SD = 0.501) against the control (M = 1.40, SD = 0.490), t (399) = 2.398, p < 0.05). SDL in an intervention (M = 1.52, SD = 0.501) against the control (M = 1.40, SD = 0.490), t (399) = 2.398, p < 0.05. Motivation to learn in an intervention (M = 62.67, SD = 14.14) and the control (n = 267, M = 57.75), t (399) = 2.907, p < 0.01). A FPBE teaching pedagogy, was observed to be effective on the metacognition (AOR = 1.603, p < 0.05), SDL (OR = 1.729, p < 0.05) and Intrinsic motivation in learning (AOR = 1.720, p < 0.05) against conventional teaching pedagogy. Needless, was less likely to enhance Extrinsic motivation (AOR = 0.676, p > 0.05) and Amotivation (AOR = 0.538, p > 0.05). Conclusion and recommendation: FPBE teaching pedagogy, can improve student’s metacognition, self-directed learning and intrinsic motivation to learn among nurse students. Nursing curricula developers should incorporate it to produce 21st century competent and qualified nurses.

Keywords: facilitation, metacognition, motivation, self-directed

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2645 Neuroplasticity in Language Acquisition in English as Foreign Language Classrooms

Authors: Sabitha Rahim

Abstract:

In the context of teaching vocabulary of English as Foreign Language (EFL), the confluence of memory and retention is one of the most significant factors in students' language acquisition. The progress of students engaged in foreign language acquisition is often stymied by vocabulary attrition, which leads to learners' lack of confidence and motivation. However, among other factors, little research has investigated the importance of neuroplasticity in Foreign Language acquisition and how underused neural pathways lead to the loss of plasticity, thereby affecting the learners’ vocabulary retention and motivation. This research explored the effect of enhancing vocabulary acquisition of EFL students in the Foundation Year at King Abdulaziz University through various methods and neuroplasticity exercises that reinforced their attention, motivation, and engagement. It analyzed the results to determine if stimulating the brain of EFL learners by various physical and mental activities led to the improvement in short and long term memory in vocabulary retention. The main data collection methods were student surveys, assessment records of teachers, student achievement test results, and students' follow-up interviews. A key implication of this research is for the institutions to consider having multiple varieties of student activities promoting brain plasticity within the classrooms as an effective tool for foreign language acquisition. Building awareness among the faculty and adapting the curriculum to include activities that promote brain plasticity ensures an enhanced learning environment and effective language acquisition in EFL classrooms.

Keywords: language acquisition, neural paths, neuroplasticity, vocabulary attrition

Procedia PDF Downloads 55
2644 Impact of Instructional Designing in Digital Game-Based Learning for Enhancing Students' Motivation

Authors: Shafaq Rubab

Abstract:

The primary reason for dropping out of school is associated with students’ lack of motivation in class, especially in mathematics. Digital game-based learning is an approach that is being actively explored; there are very few learning games based on proven instructional design models or frameworks due to which the effectiveness of the learning games suffers. The purpose of this research was twofold: first, developing an appropriate instructional design model and second, evaluating the impact of the instructional design model on students’ motivation. This research contributes significantly to the existing literature in terms of student motivation and the impact of instructional design model in digital game-based learning. The sample size for this study consists of two hundred out-of-school students between the age of 6 and 12 years. The research methodology used for this research was a quasi-experimental approach and data was analyzed by using the instructional material motivational survey questionnaire which is adapted from the Keller Arcs model. Control and experimental groups consisting of two hundred students were analyzed by utilizing instructional material motivational survey (IMMS), and comparison of result from both groups showed the difference in the level of motivation of the students. The result of the research showed that the motivational level of student in the experimental group who were taught by the game was higher than the student in control group (taught by conventional methodology). The mean score of the experimental group against all subscales (attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction) of IMMS survey was higher; however, no statistical significance was found between the motivational scores of control and experimental group. The positive impact of game-based learning on students’ level of motivation, as measured in this study, strengthens the case for the use of pedagogically sound instructional design models in the design of interactive learning applications. In addition, the present study suggests learning from interactive, immersive applications as an alternative solution for children, especially in Third World countries, who, for various reasons, do not attend school. The mean score of experimental group against all subscales of IMMS survey was higher; however, no statistical significance was found between motivational scores of control and experimental group.

Keywords: digital game-based learning, students’ motivation, and instructional designing, instructional material motivational survey

Procedia PDF Downloads 349
2643 English Language Teachers' Personal Motivation Influences Their Professional Motivation

Authors: Gulderen Saglam

Abstract:

This study explores the elements of personal motivation which influence professional motivation of in-service English language teachers in Bursa in Turkey. Fifty English language teachers participated in a seminar held on ‘teachers’ motivation’ for the length of six hours in two days, which were organized by the local Ministry of Education. During the seminar, teachers firstly aimed to share cornerstones of their professional motivation. Later, those teachers stated the significance of their personal motivation. Two months’ later, those teachers were given the questionnaire including both closed and open-ended questions involving those two types of motivational acts of teachers. Questionnaire items were tested by Crombah’s Alfa Reliability Statistics. Responses to the questionnaire were analyzed by factor analysis and test of normality. The results were also tested by non-parametric and parametric tests. As a result, it was found that language teachers who were personally motivated reported higher professional motivation of theirs in teaching profession in-service.

Keywords: influencing factor, in-service-teachers, personal motivation, professional motivation, in-service-teachers, influencing factor

Procedia PDF Downloads 191
2642 A Model for Adaptive Online Quiz: QCitra

Authors: Rosilah Hassan, Karam Dhafer Mayoof, Norngainy Mohd Tawil, Shamshubaridah Ramlee

Abstract:

Application of adaptive online quiz system and a design are performed in this paper. The purpose of adaptive quiz system is to establish different questions automatically for each student and measure their competence on a definite area of discipline. This model determines students competencies in cases like distant-learning which experience challenges frequently. Questions are specialized to allow clear deductions about student gains; they are able to identify student competencies more effectively. Also, negative effects of questions requiring higher knowledge than competency over student’s morale and self-confidence are dismissed. The advantage of the system in the quiz management requires less total time for measuring and is more flexible. Self sufficiency of the system in terms of repeating, planning and assessment of the measurement process allows itself to be used in the individual education sets. Adaptive quiz technique prevents students from distraction and motivation loss, which is led by the questions with quite lower hardness level than student’s competency.

Keywords: e-learning, adaptive system, security, quiz database

Procedia PDF Downloads 378