Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

Search results for: struvite

4 Growth of Struvite Crystals in Synthetic Urine Using Magnesium Nitrate

Authors: Reneiloe Seodigeng, John Kabuba, Hilary Rutto, Tumisang Seodigeng

Abstract:

Urine diversion toilets have become popular as a means of solving the challenges in sanitation. As a result, the source-separated urine must be adequately treated so that it can be disposed of safely and valuable struvite can be extracted for use as fertilizer. In this study, synthetic urine was prepared, and struvite crystallisation experiments carried out using magnesium nitrate. The effect of residence time on crystal growth was studied. At residence time of 10, 30 and 60 minutes, mean particle sizes were 17, 34 and 53 µm showing that with higher residence times, larger crystal sizes can be achieved. SEM analysis of the crystal showed that the resultant crystals had the typical morphology of struvite crystals.

Keywords: struvite, magnesium nitrate, crystallisation, urine treatment

Procedia PDF Downloads 34
3 Inhibition of Crystallization Lithiasis Phosphate (Struvite) by Extracts Zea mays

Authors: N. Benahmed, A. Cheriti

Abstract:

Kidney stones of infectious origin, in particular, the phosphate amoniaco-magnesian hexahydrate or struvite are one of the risk factors that most often leads of renal insufficiency. Many plants species, described in pharmacopoeias of several countries is used as a remedy for urinary stones, the latter is a disease resulting from the presence of stones in the kidneys or urinary tract. Our research is based on the existing relationship between the effect of extracts of medicinal plant used for the cure of urinary tract diseases in the region of Algeria south-west on urolithiasis especially Ammonium-Magnesium Phosphate Hexahydrate (Struvite). We have selected Zea mays L. (POACEAE) for this study. On the first stage, we have studied the crystallisation of struvite 'in vitro' without inhibitors, after we have compared to crystallization with inhibitors. Most of The organic and aqueous extracts of this plant give an effect on the crystal size of struvite. It is a very significant reduction in the size of the crystals of struvite in the presence of hexane and ethanol extract (12 to 5-6 μm). We’ve observed a decrease in the size of the aggregates in the presence of all the extracts. This reduction is important for the aqueous, acetone and chloroform extract (45 to 10-16μm). Finally, a deep study was conducted on the effective extract of Zea mays L.; for determine the influence of inhibitory phytochemical compounds.

Keywords: medicinal plants, struvite, urolithiasis, zea mays

Procedia PDF Downloads 330
2 Potentiostatic Growth of Hazenite Mineral Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in 0.1 M K₂HPO₄/0.1 M Na₂HPO₄ Solution

Authors: Liping Wu, Durga Bhakta Pokharel, Junhua Dong, Changgang Wang, Lin Zhao, Wei Ke, Nan Chen

Abstract:

Hazenite conversion coating was deposited on AZ31 Mg alloy in a deaerated phosphate solution containing 0.1 M K₂HPO₄ and 0.1 M Na₂HPO₄ (Na₀.₁K0₀.₁) with pH 9 at −0.8 V. The coating mechanism of hazenite was elucidated by in situ potentiostatic current decay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The volume of H₂ evolved during potentiostatic polarization was measured by a gas collection apparatus. The degradation resistance of the hazenite coating was evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37℃ by using potentiodynamic polarization (PDP). The results showed that amorphous Mg(OH)₂ was deposited first, followed by the transformation of Mg(OH)₂ to amorphous MgHPO₄, subsequently the conversion of MgHPO₄ to crystallized K-struvite (KMgPO₄·6H₂O), finally the crystallization of crystallized hazenite (NaKMg₂(PO₄)₂·14H₂O). The deposited coating was composed of four layers where the inner layer is comprised of Mg(OH)₂, the middle layer of Mg(OH)₂ and MgHPO₄, the top layer of Mg(OH)₂, MgHPO₄ and K-struvite, the topmost layer of Mg(OH)₂, MgHPO₄, K-struvite and hazenite (NaKMg₂(PO₄)₂·14H₂O). The PD results showed that the hazenite coating decreased the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude.

Keywords: magnesium alloy, potentiostatic technique, hazenite, mineral conversion coating

Procedia PDF Downloads 50
1 Phosphorus Recovery Optimization in Microbial Fuel Cell

Authors: Abdullah Almatouq

Abstract:

Understanding the impact of key operational variables on concurrent energy generation and phosphorus recovery in microbial fuel cell is required to improve the process and reduce the operational cost. In this study, full factorial design (FFD) and central composite designs (CCD) were employed to identify the effect of influent COD concentration and cathode aeration flow rate on energy generation and phosphorus (P) recovery and to optimise MFC power density and P recovery. Results showed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and cathode aeration flow rate had a significant effect on power density, coulombic efficiency, phosphorus precipitation efficiency and phosphorus precipitation rate at the cathode. P precipitation was negatively affected by the generated current during the batch duration. The generated energy was reduced due to struvite being precipitated on the cathode surface, which might obstruct the mass transfer of ions and oxygen. Response surface mathematical model was used to predict the optimum operating conditions that resulted in a maximum power density and phosphorus precipitation efficiency of 184 mW/m² and 84%, and this corresponds to COD= 1700 mg/L and aeration flow rate=210 mL/min. The findings highlight the importance of the operational conditions of energy generation and phosphorus recovery.

Keywords: energy, microbial fuel cell, phosphorus, struvite

Procedia PDF Downloads 69