Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 148

Search results for: scientist's mindset

148 Impact of Entrepreneurial Education on Entrepreneurial Success through Entrepreneurial Mindset, Professional Growth, and Innovation

Authors: Hummaira Qudsia Yousaf, Sidra Munawar

Abstract:

The study aims to examine in which way entrepreneurial education and attitude affect the entrepreneur’s success with the help of an entrepreneurial mindset, professional growth, and innovation. The target population was the entrepreneurs of successful startups in Pakistan. Data was gathered through an e-questionnaire, and 230 responses were analyzed using the partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Resultantly, entrepreneurial education is an essential component for the development of an entrepreneurial mindset. Also, an entrepreneurial attitude is responsible for the entrepreneurial mindset, which enhances professional growth. Moreover, the study highlighted that innovation is as necessary as mindset and education are for entrepreneurs. Furthermore, the findings confirmed that professional growth brings innovation to the success of entrepreneurs. This study provides proof of how entrepreneurial education and attitude influence pupils’ success in making entrepreneurs. This study extends the scope of education by incorporating predictors, such as professional growth, innovation, and entrepreneurial success. The study is unique due to the usage of innovative techniques for professional growth that ultimately bring career success.

Keywords: entrepreneurial education, entrepreneurial attitude, entrepreneurial mindset, professional growth, entrepreneurial success, innovation

Procedia PDF Downloads 26
147 Thai Teachers' Growth Mindset as Related to Thai Students' Achievements

Authors: Chintida Vichitsophaphan, Piyapat Chitpirom, Chaichana Nimnuan, Teerakiat Jareonsettasin

Abstract:

The purpose of this research is to study the influence of a growth mindset, as defined by Prof. Dweck, in Thai teachers and Thai students’ achievements and success. The participants of the study were teachers of schools in Office of the Basic Education Commission in Bangkok. The teachers were recruited from high achievement schools and low achievement schools (based on average National Standard Test Score). Participants were divided into two groups: 85 teachers in 3 high achievement schools and 213 teachers in 6 low achievement schools. They were asked to complete the Carol Dweck’s Implicit Theories Scale – (Adults) 8 items. Data were analyzed including the use of mean, standard deviation and t-test to test hypothesis. The finding of this study revealed that teachers who were in the high achievement schools have higher scores in Carol Dweck’s Implicit Theories Scale (x ̅= 35.5, SE = .58) than teachers who were in the low achievement schools (x ̅= 33.9, SE = .35) at .05 level. The difference is statistically significant (t (296) = 2.44, p = .015) with the effect size of 0.31. In conclusion, teachers’ growth mindset from high achievement schools have higher scores than teachers’ growth mindset from low achievement schools, and this is statistically significant. From the study, it can be concluded that growth mindset development for teachers has a tendency to increase students’ achievements. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement such training and development in our education system in larger scale, and even nationwide policies.

Keywords: fixed mindset, growth mindset, students’ achievement, teachers’ growth mindset

Procedia PDF Downloads 404
146 Identifying the Mindset of Deaf Benildean Students in Learning Anatomy and Physiology

Authors: Joanne Rieta Miranda

Abstract:

Learning anatomy and physiology among Deaf Non-Science major students is a challenge. They have this mindset that Anatomy and Physiology are difficult and very technical. In this study, nine (9) deaf students who are business majors were considered. Non-conventional teaching strategies and classroom activities were employed such as cooperative learning, virtual lab, Facebook live, big sky, blood typing, mind mapping, reflections, etc. Of all the activities; the deaf students ranked cooperative learning as the best learning activity. This is where they played doctors. They measured the pulse rate, heart rate and blood pressure of their partner classmate. In terms of mindset, 2 out of 9 students have a growth mindset with some fixed ideas while 7 have a fixed mindset with some growth ideas. All the students passed the course. Three out of nine students got a grade of 90% and above. The teacher was evaluated by the deaf students as very satisfactory with a mean score of 3.54. This means that the learner-centered practices in the classroom are manifested to a great extent.

Keywords: deaf students, learning anatomy and physiology, teaching strategies, learner-entered practices

Procedia PDF Downloads 163
145 Influence of Intelligence and Failure Mindsets on Parent's Failure Feedback

Authors: Sarah Kalaouze, Maxine Iannucelli, Kristen Dunfield

Abstract:

Children’s implicit beliefs regarding intelligence (i.e., intelligence mindsets) influence their motivation, perseverance, and success. Previous research suggests that the way parents perceive failure influences the development of their child’s intelligence mindsets. We invited 151 children-parent dyads (Age= 5–6 years) to complete a series of difficult puzzles over zoom. We assessed parents’ intelligence and failure mindsets using questionnaires and recorded parents’ person/performance-oriented (e.g., “you are smart” or "you were almost able to complete that one) and process-oriented (e.g., “you are trying really hard” or "maybe if you place the bigger pieces first") failure feedback. We were interested in observing the relation between parental mindsets and the type of feedback provided. We found that parents’ intelligence mindsets were not predictive of the feedback they provided children. Failure mindsets, on the other hand, were predictive of failure feedback. Parents who view failure-as-debilitating provided more person-oriented feedback, focusing on performance and personal ability. Whereas parents who view failure-as-enhancing provided process-oriented feedback, focusing on effort and strategies. Taken all together, our results allow us to determine that although parents might already have a growth intelligence mindset, they don’t necessarily have a failure-as-enhancing mindset. Parents adopting a failure-as-enhancing mindset would influence their children to view failure as a learning opportunity, further promoting practice, effort, and perseverance during challenging tasks. The focus placed on a child’s learning, rather than their performance, encourages them to perceive intelligence as malleable (growth mindset) rather than fix (fixed mindset). This implies that parents should not only hold a growth mindset but thoroughly understand their role in the transmission of intelligence beliefs.

Keywords: mindset(s), failure, intelligence, parental feedback, parents

Procedia PDF Downloads 16
144 Impact of Lifelong-Learning Mindset on Career Success of the Accounting and Finance Professionals

Authors: R. W. A. V. A. Wijenayake, P. M. R. N. Fernando, S. Nilesh, M. D. G. M. S. Diddeniya, M. Weligodapola, P. Shamila

Abstract:

The study is designed to examine the impact of a lifelong learning mindset on the career success of accounting and finance professionals in the western province of Sri Lanka. The learning mindset impacts the career success of accounting and finance professionals. The main objective of this study is to identify how the lifelong-learning mindset impacts on the career success of accounting and finance professionals. The lifelong learning mindset is the desire to learn new things and curiosity, resilience, and strategic thinking are the selected constructs to measure the lifelong learning mindset. Career success refers to certain objectives and emotional measures of improvement in one’s work life. The related variables of career success are measured through the number of promotions that have been granted in his/her work life. Positivism is the research paradigm, and the deductive approach is involved as this study relies on testing an existing theory. To conduct the study, the accounting and finance professionals in the western province in Sri Lanka were selected because most reputed international and local companies and specifically, headquarters of most of the companies are in western province. The responses cannot be collected from the whole population. Therefore, this study used a simple random sampling method, and the sample size was 120. Therefore, to identify the impact, 5-point Likert scale is used to perform this quantitative data. Required data gathered through an online questionnaire and the final outputs of the study will offer certain important recommendations to several parties such as universities, undergraduates, companies, and the policymakers to improve, help mentally and financially and motivate the students and the employees to continue their studies without ceasing after completion of their degree.

Keywords: career success, curiosity, lifelong learning mindset, resilience, strategic thinking

Procedia PDF Downloads 8
143 An Explorative Study of the Application of Project Management in German Research Projects

Authors: Marcel Randermann, Roland Jochem

Abstract:

Research activities are mostly conducted in form of projects. In fact, research projects take the highest share of all project forms combined. However, project management is very rarely applied purposefully by researchers and scientists. More specifically no project management frameworks, methods or tools are not being used to plan, execute or control research project to ensure research success or improve project quality. In this qualitative study, several interviews were conducted with scientists and research managers from German institutions to gain insights into project management activities, to determine challenges and barriers, and to evaluate premises for successful project management. The analyses show that conventional project management is not easily applicable in scientific environments and researchers’ mindsets prevent a reasonable application.

Keywords: academics, project management methods, research and science projects, scientist's mindset

Procedia PDF Downloads 96
142 Phenomenological Study on the Counseling Stress Experience of School Counselors

Authors: Park Jin Hee

Abstract:

The purpose of this research is to analyze the meaning and essence of stress experiences school counselors experience while providing counseling. For this research, interviews were conducted with ten school counselors and analyze the interview findings by using phenomenological method of Colaizzi. As for the conclusion in this research, several of types of emotions and mindset of school counselors were examined, and the positive and negative effects of such emotions and mindset on counseling process were shown.

Keywords: counseling stress experience, meaning, school counselors, phenomenological study

Procedia PDF Downloads 259
141 Mastering Digital Transformation with the Strategy Tandem Innovation Inside-Out/Outside-In: An Approach to Drive New Business Models, Services and Products in the Digital Age

Authors: S. N. Susenburger, D. Boecker

Abstract:

In the age of Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity (VUCA), where digital transformation is challenging long standing traditional hardware and manufacturing companies, innovation needs a different methodology, strategy, mindset, and culture. What used to be a mindset of scaling per quantity is now shifting to orchestrating ecosystems, platform business models and service bundles. While large corporations are trying to mimic the nimbleness and versatile mindset of startups in the core of their digital strategies, they’re at the frontier of facing one of the largest organizational and cultural changes in history. This paper elaborates on how a manufacturing giant transformed its Corporate Information Technology (IT) to enable digital and Internet of Things (IoT) business while establishing the mindset and the approaches of the Innovation Inside-Out/Outside-In Strategy. It gives insights into the core elements of an innovation culture and the tactics and methodologies leveraged to support the cultural shift and transformation into an IoT company. This paper also outlines the core elements for an innovation culture and how the persona 'Connected Engineer' thrives in the digital innovation environment. Further, it explores how tapping domain-focused ecosystems in vibrant innovative cities can be used as a part of the strategy to facilitate partner co-innovation. Therefore, findings from several use cases, observations and surveys led to conclusion for the strategy tandem of Innovation Inside-Out/Outside-In. The findings indicate that it's crucial in which phases and maturity level the Innovation Inside-Out/Outside-In Strategy is activated: cultural aspects of the business and the regional ecosystem need to be considered, as well as cultural readiness from management and active contributors. The 'not invented here syndrome' is a barrier of large corporations that need to be addressed and managed to successfully drive partnerships, as well as embracing co-innovation and a mindset shifting away from physical products toward new business models, services, and IoT platforms. This paper elaborates on various methodologies and approaches tested in different countries and cultures, including the U.S., Brazil, Mexico, and Germany.

Keywords: innovation management, innovation culture, innovation methodologies, digital transformation

Procedia PDF Downloads 62
140 Supporting a Moral Growth Mindset Among College Students

Authors: Kate Allman, Heather Maranges, Elise Dykhuis

Abstract:

Moral Growth Mindset (MGM) is the belief that one has the capacity to become a more moral person, as opposed to a fixed conception of one’s moral ability and capacity (Han et al., 2018). Building from Dweck’s work in incremental implicit theories of intelligence (2008), Moral Growth Mindset (Han et al., 2020) extends growth mindsets into the moral dimension. The concept of MGM has the potential to help researchers understand how both mindsets and interventions can impact character development, and it has even been shown to have connections to voluntary service engagement (Han et al., 2018). Understanding the contexts in which MGM might be cultivated could help to promote the further cultivation of character, in addition to prosocial behaviors like service engagement, which may, in turn, promote larger scale engagement in social justice-oriented thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In particular, college may be a place to intentionally cultivate a growth mindset toward moral capacities, given the unique developmental and maturational components of the college experience, including contextual opportunity (Lapsley & Narvaez, 2006) and independence requiring the constant consideration, revision, and internalization of personal values (Lapsley & Woodbury, 2016). In a semester-long, quasi-experimental study, we examined the impact of a pedagogical approach designed to cultivate college student character development on participants’ MGM. With an intervention (n=69) and a control group (n=97; Pre-course: 27% Men; 66% Women; 68% White; 18% Asian; 2% Black; <1% Hispanic/Latino), we investigated whether college courses that intentionally incorporate character education pedagogy (Lamb, Brant, Brooks, 2021) affect a variety of psychosocial variables associated with moral thoughts, feelings, identity, and behavior (e.g. moral growth mindset, honesty, compassion, etc.). The intervention group consisted of 69 undergraduate students (Pre-course: 40% Men; 52% Women; 68% White; 10.5% Black; 7.4% Asian; 4.2% Hispanic/Latino) that voluntarily enrolled in five undergraduate courses that encouraged students to engage with key concepts and methods of character development through the application of research-based strategies and personal reflection on goals and experiences. Moral Growth Mindset was measured using the four-item Moral Growth Mindset scale (Han et al., 2020), with items such as You can improve your basic morals and character considerably on a six-point Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 6 (strongly agree). Higher scores of MGM indicate a stronger belief that one can become a more moral person with personal effort. Reliability at Time 1 was Cronbach’s ɑ= .833, and at Time 2 Cronbach’s ɑ= .772. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to explore whether post-course MGM scores were different between the intervention and control when controlling for pre-course MGM scores. The ANCOVA indicated significant differences in MGM between groups post-course, F(1,163) = 8.073, p = .005, R² = .11, where descriptive statistics indicate that intervention scores were higher than the control group at post-course. Results indicate that intentional character development pedagogy can be leveraged to support the development of Moral Growth Mindset and related capacities in undergraduate settings.

Keywords: moral personality, character education, incremental theories of personality, growth mindset

Procedia PDF Downloads 67
139 Fostering Positive Mindset: Grounded Theory Study of Self-Awareness in Emerging Adults

Authors: Maha Ben Salem

Abstract:

The transformative aspect of emerging adulthood brings about a development of self-processes, including changes in self-esteem and personal goals. Success in this life stage entails the emotional growth necessary to navigate the demands and challenges of college life. Understanding the concept of self-awareness within this particular age group sheds light on emerging adults’ internal world and the transformative aspect of their emotional growth. Uncovering the thoughts' processes that foster or hinder self-awareness is important to the understanding of how emerging adults learn to make themselves positive or negative. However, existing research in self-awareness has explored this phenomenon mostly using quantitative research methodology or through tying an individual’s level of self-awareness to specific actions or outcomes. Little is known about the process of how college students emerging adults notice and monitor their inner thoughts and emotions. Methodology and theoretical orientation: A grounded theory study using in-depth semi-structured interview was utilized. Nine interviews have been conducted. A constructionist framework was employed to generate a theory as for how self-awareness facilitates specific patterns of thinking in emerging adults. The choice of grounded theory emanates from a lack of knowledge regarding underlying thinking procedures and internal states that emerging adult college students navigate in an attempt to make meaning out of the new academic experience and life stage. Findings: Initial data analysis generated the following categories of the theory: (a) a non-judgmental perception of negative thinking and negative emotions that allow for a better understanding of the self; (b) negative state of mind is easy to overcome when it is accepted and acknowledged; (c) knowledge of the actual and desired self-generates an intentional decision to shift to a positive mindset. Preliminary findings indicate that college academic and social environment foster a new understanding of the self that yield a change in mindset and in self-knowledge.

Keywords: college environment, emergent adults, grounded theory, positive mindset, self-awareness

Procedia PDF Downloads 65
138 The Relationship between Confidence, Accuracy, and Decision Making in a Mobile Review Program

Authors: Carla Van De Sande, Jana Vandenberg

Abstract:

Just like physical skills, cognitive skills grow rusty over time unless they are regularly used and practiced, so academic breaks can have negative consequences on student learning and success. The Keeping in School Shape (KiSS) program is an engaging, accessible, and cost-effective intervention that harnesses the benefits of retrieval practice by using technology to help students maintain proficiency over breaks from school by delivering a daily review problem via text message or email. A growth mindset is promoted through feedback messages encouraging students to try again if they get a problem wrong and to take on a challenging problem if they get a problem correct. This paper reports on the relationship between confidence, accuracy, and decision-making during the implementation of the KiSS Program at a large university during winter break for students enrolled in an engineering introductory Calculus course sequence.

Keywords: growth mindset, learning loss, on-the-go learning, retrieval practice

Procedia PDF Downloads 118
137 The Residual Effects of Special Merchandising Sections on Consumers' Shopping Behavior

Authors: Shih-Ching Wang, Mark Lang

Abstract:

This paper examines the secondary effects and consequences of special displays on subsequent shopping behavior. Special displays are studied as a prominent form of in-store or shopper marketing activity. Two experiments are performed using special value and special quality-oriented displays in an online simulated store environment. The impact of exposure to special displays on mindsets and resulting product choices are tested in a shopping task. Impact on store image is also tested. The experiments find that special displays do trigger shopping mindsets that affect product choices and shopping basket composition and value. There are intended and unintended positive and negative effects found. Special value displays improve store price image but trigger a price sensitive shopping mindset that causes more lower-priced items to be purchased, lowering total basket dollar value. Special natural food displays improve store quality image and trigger a quality-oriented mindset that causes fewer lower-priced items to be purchased, increasing total basket dollar value. These findings extend the theories of product categorization, mind-sets, and price sensitivity found in communication research into the retail store environment. Findings also warn retailers to consider the total effects and consequences of special displays when designing and executing in-store or shopper marketing activity.

Keywords: special displays, mindset, shopping behavior, price consciousness, product categorization, store image

Procedia PDF Downloads 174
136 The Role of E-Learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education

Authors: Annette McArthur

Abstract:

The traditional model of teaching and learning, where ICT sits as a separate entity is not a model for a 21st century school. It is imperative that teaching and learning embraces technological advancements. The challenge in schools lies in shifting the mindset of teachers so they see ICT as integral to their teaching, learning and curriculum rather than a separate E-Learning curriculum stream. This research project investigates how the effective, planned, intentional integration of ICT into a STEM curriculum, can enable the shift in the teacher mindset. The project incorporated: • Developing a professional coaching relationship with key STEM teachers. • Facilitating staff professional development involving student centered project based learning pedagogy in the context of a STEM curriculum. • Facilitating staff professional development involving digital literacy. • Establishing a professional community where collaboration; sharing and reflection were part of the culture of the STEM community. • Facilitating classroom support for the effective delivery innovative STEM curriculum. • Developing STEM learning spaces where technologies were used to empower and engage learners to participate in student-centered, project-based learning.

Keywords: e-learning, ICT, project based learning, STEM

Procedia PDF Downloads 236
135 Family-School-Community Engagement: Building a Growth Mindset

Authors: Michelann Parr

Abstract:

Family-school-community engagement enhances family-school-community well-being, collective confidence, and school climate. While it is often referred to as a positive thing in the literature for families, schools, and communities, it does not come without its struggles. While there are numerous things families, schools, and communities do each and every day to enhance engagement, it is often difficult to find our way to true belonging and engagement. Working our way surface level barriers is easy; we can provide childcare, transportation, resources, and refreshments. We can even change the environment so that families will feel welcome, valued, and respected. But there are often mindsets and perpsectives buried deep below the surface, most often grounded in societal, familial, and political norms, expectations, pressures, and narratives. This work requires ongoing energy, commitment, and engagement of all stakeholders, including families, schools, and communities. Each and every day, we need to take a reflective and introspective stance at what is said and done and how it supports the overall goal of family-school-community engagement. And whatever we must occur within a paradigm of care in additional to one of critical thinking and social justice. Families, and those working with families, must not simply accept all that is given, but should instead ask these types of questions: a) How, and by whom, are the current philosophies and practices of family-school engagement interrogated? b) How might digging below surface level meanings support understanding of what is being said and done? c) How can we move toward meaningful and authentic engagement that balances knowledge and power between family, school, district, community (local and global), and government? This type of work requires conscious attention and intentional decision-making at all levels bringing us one step closer to authentic and meaningful partnerships. Strategies useful to building a growth mindset include: a) interrogating and exploring consistencies and inconsistencies by looking at what is done and what is not done through multiple perspectives; b) recognizing that enhancing family-engagement and changing mindsets take place at the micro-level (e.g., family and school), but also require active engagement and awareness at the macro-level (e.g., community agencies, district school boards, government); c) taking action as an advocate or activist. Negative narratives about families, schools, and communities should not be maintained, but instead critical and courageous conversations in and out of school should be initiated and sustained; and d) maintaining consistency, simplicity, and steady progress. All involved in engagement need to be aware of the struggles, but keep them in check with the many successes. Change may not be observed on a day-to-day basis or even immediately, but stepping back and looking from the outside in, might change the view. Working toward a growth mindset will produce better results than a fixed mindset, and this takes time.

Keywords: family engagment, family-school-community engagement, parent engagement, parent involvment

Procedia PDF Downloads 121
134 Effectiveness of an Intervention to Increase Physics Students' STEM Self-Efficacy: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study

Authors: Stephanie J. Sedberry, William J. Gerace, Ian D. Beatty, Michael J. Kane

Abstract:

Increasing the number of US university students who attain degrees in STEM and enter the STEM workforce is a national priority. Demographic groups vary in their rates of participation in STEM, and the US produces just 10% of the world’s science and engineering degrees (2014 figures). To address these gaps, we have developed and tested a practical, 30-minute, single-session classroom-based intervention to improve students’ self-efficacy and academic performance in University STEM courses. Self-efficacy is a psychosocial construct that strongly correlates with academic success. Self-efficacy is a construct that is internal and relates to the social, emotional, and psychological aspects of student motivation and performance. A compelling body of research demonstrates that university students’ self-efficacy beliefs are strongly related to their selection of STEM as a major, aspirations for STEM-related careers, and persistence in science. The development of an intervention to increase students’ self-efficacy is motivated by research showing that short, social-psychological interventions in education can lead to large gains in student achievement. Our intervention addresses STEM self-efficacy via two strong, but previously separate, lines of research into attitudinal/affect variables that influence student success. The first is ‘attributional retraining,’ in which students learn to attribute their successes and failures to internal rather than external factors. The second is ‘mindset’ about fixed vs. growable intelligence, in which students learn that the brain remains plastic throughout life and that they can, with conscious effort and attention to thinking skills and strategies, become smarter. Extant interventions for both of these constructs have significantly increased academic performance in the classroom. We developed a 34-item questionnaire (Likert scale) to measure STEM Self-efficacy, Perceived Academic Control, and Growth Mindset in a University STEM context, and validated it with exploratory factor analysis, Rasch analysis, and multi-trait multi-method comparison to coded interviews. Four iterations of our 42-week research protocol were conducted across two academic years (2017-2018) at three different Universities in North Carolina, USA (UNC-G, NC A&T SU, and NCSU) with varied student demographics. We utilized a quasi-experimental prospective multiple-group time series research design with both experimental and control groups, and we are employing linear modeling to estimate the impact of the intervention on Self-Efficacy,wth-Mindset, Perceived Academic Control, and final course grades (performance measure). Preliminary results indicate statistically significant effects of treatment vs. control on Self-Efficacy, Growth-Mindset, Perceived Academic Control. Analyses are ongoing and final results pending. This intervention may have the potential to increase student success in the STEM classroom—and ownership of that success—to continue in a STEM career. Additionally, we have learned a great deal about the complex components and dynamics of self-efficacy, their link to performance, and the ways they can be impacted to improve students’ academic performance.

Keywords: academic performance, affect variables, growth mindset, intervention, perceived academic control, psycho-social variables, self-efficacy, STEM, university classrooms

Procedia PDF Downloads 64
133 Wound Healing Dressing and Some Composites Such as Zeolite, TiO2, Chitosan and PLGA as New Alternative for Melanoma Therapy: A Review

Authors: L. B. Naves, L. Almeida

Abstract:

The development of Drugs Delivery System (DDS), has been wildly investigated in the last decades. In this paper, first a general overview of traditional and modern wound dressing is presented. This is followed by a review of what scientist have done in the medical environment, focusing the possibility to develop a new alternative for DDS through transdermal pathway, aiming to treat melanoma skin cancer.

Keywords: cancer therapy, dressing polymers, melanoma, wound healing

Procedia PDF Downloads 338
132 Caribbean Universities and the Global Educational Market: An Examination of Entrepreneurship and Leadership in an Era of Change

Authors: Paulette Henry

Abstract:

If Caribbean Universities wish to remain sustainable in the global education market they must meet the new demands of the 21st Centuries learners. This means preparing the teaching and learning environment with the human and material and resources so that the University can blossom out into the entrepreneurial University. The entrepreneurial University prepares the learner to become a global citizen, one who is innovative and a critical thinker and has the competencies to create jobs. Entrepreneurship education provides more equitable access to university education building capacity for the local and global economy. The entrepreneurial thinking, the mindset, must therefore be among academic and support staff as well as students. In developing countries where resources are scarce, Universities are grappling with a myriad of financial and non-financial issues. These include increasing costs, Union demands for increased remuneration for staff and reduced subvention from governments which has become the norm. In addition, there is the political pressure against increasing tuition fees and the perceptions on the moral responsibilities of universities in national development. The question is how do small universities carve out their niche, meet both political and consumer demands for a high quality, low lost education, fulfil their development mandate and still remain not only viable but competitive. Themes which are central to this discourse on the transitions necessary for the entrepreneurial university are leadership, governance and staff well-being. This paper therefore presents a case study of a Caribbean University to show how transformational leadership and the change management framework propels change towards an entrepreneurial institution seeking to have a competitive advantage despite its low resourced context. Important to this discourse are the transformational approaches used by the University to prepare staff to move from their traditional psyche to embracing an entrepreneurial mindset whilst equipping students within the same mode to become work ready and creative global citizens. Using the mixed methods approach, opinions were garnered from both members of the University community as well as external stakeholder groups on their perception of the role of the University in the business arena and as a primary stakeholder in national development. One of the critical concepts emanating from the discourse was the need to change the mindset of the those in university governance as well as how national stakeholders engage the university. This paper shows how multiple non-financial factors can contribute to change. A combination of transformational and servant leadership, strengthened institutional structures and developing new ones, rebuilding institutional trust and pride have been among the strategies employed within the change management framework. The university is no longer limited by borders but through international linkages has transcended into a transnational stakeholder.

Keywords: competitiveness, context, entrepreneurial, leadership

Procedia PDF Downloads 135
131 New Approach for Melanoma Skin Cancer Controled Releasing Drugs for Neutron Capture Therapy: A Review

Authors: Lucas Bernardes Naves, Luis Almeida

Abstract:

The paper includes a review concerning the use of some composites including poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PGLA), zeolite and Gadopentetic acid (Gd-DTPA) loaded chitosan nanoparticles (Gd-nanoCPs) in order to establish a new alternative for the treatment of Melanoma Skin Cancer. The main goal of this paper it to make a review of what scientist have done in the last few years, as well as to propose a less invasive therapy for skin cancer, by using Hydrocolloid, based on PLGA coated with Gd-nanoCPs for Neutron Capture Therapy.

Keywords: cancer therapy, dressing polymers, melanoma, wound healing

Procedia PDF Downloads 330
130 Developing a Discourse Community of Doctoral Students in a Multicultural Context

Authors: Jinghui Wang, Minjie Xing

Abstract:

The increasing number of international students for doctoral education has brought vitality and diversity to the educational environment in China, and at the same time constituted a new challenge to the English teaching in the higher education as the majority of international students come from developing countries where English is not their first language. To make their contribution to knowledge development and technical innovation, these international doctoral students need to present their research work in English, locally and globally. This study reports an exploratory study with an emphasis on the cognition and construction of academic discourse in the multicultural context. The present study aims to explore ways to better prepare them for international academic exchange in English. Voluntarily, all international doctoral students (n = 81) from 35 countries enrolled in the English Course: Speaking and Writing as a New Scientist, participated in the study. Two research questions were raised: 1) What did these doctoral students say about their cognition and construction of English academic discourses? 2) How did they manage to develop their productive skills in a multicultural context? To answer the research questions, data were collected from self-reports, in-depth interviews, and video-recorded class observations. The major findings of the study suggest that the participants to varying degrees benefitted from the cognition and construction of English academic discourse in the multicultural context. Specifically, 1) The cognition and construction of meta-discourse allowed them to construct their own academic discourses in English; 2) In the light of Swales’ CARS Model, they became sensitive to the “moves” involved in the published papers closely related to their study, and learned to use them in their English academic discourses; 3) Multimodality-driven presentation (multimedia modes) enabled these doctoral student to have their voice heard for technical innovation purposes; 4) Speaking as a new scientist, every doctoral student felt happy and able to serve as an intercultural mediator in the multicultural context, bridging the gap between their home culture and the global culture; and most importantly, 5) most of the participants reported developing an English discourse community among international doctoral students, becoming resourceful and productive in the multicultural context. It is concluded that the cognition and construction of academic discourse in the multicultural context proves to be conducive to the productivity and intercultural citizenship education of international doctoral students.

Keywords: academic discourse, international doctoral students, meta-discourse, multicultural context

Procedia PDF Downloads 314
129 On Coverage Probability of Confidence Intervals for the Normal Mean with Known Coefficient of Variation

Authors: Suparat Niwitpong, Sa-aat Niwitpong

Abstract:

Statistical inference of normal mean with known coefficient of variation has been investigated recently. This phenomenon occurs normally in environment and agriculture experiments when the scientist knows the coefficient of variation of their experiments. In this paper, we constructed new confidence intervals for the normal population mean with known coefficient of variation. We also derived analytic expressions for the coverage probability of each confidence interval. To confirm our theoretical results, Monte Carlo simulation will be used to assess the performance of these intervals based on their coverage probabilities.

Keywords: confidence interval, coverage probability, expected length, known coefficient of variation

Procedia PDF Downloads 314
128 Personalized Tissues and Organs Replacement – a Peek into the Future

Authors: Asaf Toker

Abstract:

Matricelf developed a technology that enables the production of autologous engineered tissue composed of matrix and cells derived from patients Omentum biopsy. The platform showed remarkable pre-clinical results for several medical conditions. The company recently licensed the technology that enabled scientist at Tel Aviv university that 3D printed a human heart from human cells and matrix for the first time in human history. The company plans to conduct its first human clinical trial for Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) early in 2023.

Keywords: tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, spinal Cord Injury, autologous implants, iPSC

Procedia PDF Downloads 49
127 Integration Process and Analytic Interface of different Environmental Open Data Sets with Java/Oracle and R

Authors: Pavel H. Llamocca, Victoria Lopez

Abstract:

The main objective of our work is the comparative analysis of environmental data from Open Data bases, belonging to different governments. This means that you have to integrate data from various different sources. Nowadays, many governments have the intention of publishing thousands of data sets for people and organizations to use them. In this way, the quantity of applications based on Open Data is increasing. However each government has its own procedures to publish its data, and it causes a variety of formats of data sets because there are no international standards to specify the formats of the data sets from Open Data bases. Due to this variety of formats, we must build a data integration process that is able to put together all kind of formats. There are some software tools developed in order to give support to the integration process, e.g. Data Tamer, Data Wrangler. The problem with these tools is that they need data scientist interaction to take part in the integration process as a final step. In our case we don’t want to depend on a data scientist, because environmental data are usually similar and these processes can be automated by programming. The main idea of our tool is to build Hadoop procedures adapted to data sources per each government in order to achieve an automated integration. Our work focus in environment data like temperature, energy consumption, air quality, solar radiation, speeds of wind, etc. Since 2 years, the government of Madrid is publishing its Open Data bases relative to environment indicators in real time. In the same way, other governments have published Open Data sets relative to the environment (like Andalucia or Bilbao). But all of those data sets have different formats and our solution is able to integrate all of them, furthermore it allows the user to make and visualize some analysis over the real-time data. Once the integration task is done, all the data from any government has the same format and the analysis process can be initiated in a computational better way. So the tool presented in this work has two goals: 1. Integration process; and 2. Graphic and analytic interface. As a first approach, the integration process was developed using Java and Oracle and the graphic and analytic interface with Java (jsp). However, in order to open our software tool, as second approach, we also developed an implementation with R language as mature open source technology. R is a really powerful open source programming language that allows us to process and analyze a huge amount of data with high performance. There are also some R libraries for the building of a graphic interface like shiny. A performance comparison between both implementations was made and no significant differences were found. In addition, our work provides with an Official Real-Time Integrated Data Set about Environment Data in Spain to any developer in order that they can build their own applications.

Keywords: open data, R language, data integration, environmental data

Procedia PDF Downloads 242
126 Variation in Adaptation Strategies of Commelina Communis L. Biotypes under Drought Stress Condition

Authors: Muhammad Haroon, LI Xiangju

Abstract:

C. communis L. is an important weed of many crop, but very little information about the adaptation strategies of C. communis L. biotypes under drought stress. We investigated five biotypes of C. communis L under drought stress to identify the adaptation mechanism. The expression of drought stress related genes (DRS1, EREB and HRB1) was up-regulated in biotypes, while in some biotypes their expression was down regulated. All five biotypes can thus regulate water balance to consume less water to maintain their status under drought stress condition. This result concluded that C. communis L. biotypes can survive longer under drought stress condition. Weed scientist should seek more effective management strategies to deal with C. communis L.

Keywords: C. communis, biotypes, drought stress, gene expression

Procedia PDF Downloads 74
125 Counselling Families with Special Needs Children: Problems and Prospect: A Case Study of Calabar Metropolis in Cross River State

Authors: Anthonia Emmanuel Inaja

Abstract:

The role of the counseling services by Special Educators, Guidance Counsellors and psychologists alike to Families and Parents of children with special needs cannot be over-emphasized. This paper examined the vital role of counseling services and its impact on the emotional and physical readiness of parents to initiate and support the education and rehabilitation needs of their children. The paper considered the importance of counseling, when counseling services are best required preparing the mindset of parents and family members as well as the immediate community of the social needs child.

Keywords: counseling, families, special, needs, children, problems, prospect

Procedia PDF Downloads 417
124 Evaluation of Soil Modulus Variation by IS 2911 and Broms Method

Authors: Mandeep Kamboj, Anand R. Katti

Abstract:

The pile of 2.4 m diameter is subjected to lateral loads and moments. These lateral loads are caused due to wind/wave forces when used in foundations of various structures such as bridge piers and high rise towers exhibiting deflections with depth. The research scientist and developer has studied and developed various procedures to evaluate the coefficient of soil modulus variation (nh), using various methods. These are verified for slender piles in sand with various diameters up to 2.4 m. The subject explains about simplified approach of the theoretical values using IS procedure and Broms method and compared with actual field soil pressure/displacement distributions measured in mono-pile along its length and across the diameter.

Keywords: bridge pier, lateral loads, mono-pile, slender piles

Procedia PDF Downloads 104
123 Answering the Call for Empirical Evidence: Burnout, Context and Remote Work

Authors: Clif P. Lewis, Ise-Lu Möller

Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on employment. The ‘future of work’ is now the ‘present of work’. Changes in the social context within which organisations are embedded necessitated drastic changes in how we work. Through the leveraging of technology and changes in mindset, we have seen exciting innovations in the world of work. This global shift in the context of employment offers a unique opportunity to examine a key unresolved issue in the study of Burnout, namely contextual antecedents. This study answers the call for deeper empirical insight into the contexts within which Burnout occur. We explore the emergence of Burnout within a remote work context by using survey data that incorporates the latest global work trends into the Areas of Worklife framework.

Keywords: burnout, remote work, pandemic, wellness

Procedia PDF Downloads 70
122 Electrospray Deposition Technique of Dye Molecules in the Vacuum

Authors: Nouf Alharbi

Abstract:

The electrospray deposition technique became an important method that enables fragile, nonvolatile molecules to be deposited in situ in high vacuum environments. Furthermore, it is considered one of the ways to close the gap between basic surface science and molecular engineering, which represents a gradual change in the range of scientist research. Also, this paper talked about one of the most important techniques that have been developed and aimed for helping to further develop and characterize the electrospray by providing data collected using an image charge detection instrument. Image charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is used to measure speed and charge distributions of the molecular ions. As well as, some data has been included using SIMION simulation to simulate the energies and masses of the molecular ions through the system in order to refine the mass-selection process.

Keywords: charge, deposition, electrospray, image, ions, molecules, SIMION

Procedia PDF Downloads 62
121 Job Resource, Personal Resource, Engagement and Performance with Balanced Score Card in the Integrated Textile Companies in Indonesia

Authors: Nurlaila Effendy

Abstract:

Companies in Asia face a number of constraints in tight competitiveness in ASEAN Economic Community 2015 and globalization. An economic capitalism system as an integral part of globalization processing brings broad impacts. They need to improve business performance in globalization and ASEAN Economic Community. Organizational development has quite clearly demonstrated that aligning individual’s personal goals with the goals of the organization translates into measurable and sustained performance improvement. Human capital is a key to achieve company performance. Employee Engagement (EE) creates and expresses themselves physically, cognitively and emotionally to achieve company goals and individual goals. One will experience a total involvement when they undertake their jobs and feel a self integration to their job and organization. A leader plays key role in attaining the goals and objectives of a company/organization. Any Manager in a company needs to have leadership competence and global mindset. As one the of positive organizational behavior developments, psychological capital (PsyCap) is assumed to be one of the most important capitals in the global mindset, in addition to intellectual capital and social capital. Textile companies also need to face a number of constraints in tight competitiveness in regional and global. This research involved 42 managers in two textiles and a spinning companies in a group, in Central Java, Indonesia. It is a quantitative research with Partial Least Squares (PLS) studying job resource (Social Support & Organizational Climate) and Personal Resource (4 dimensions of Psychological Capital & Leadership Competence) as prediction of Employee Engagement, also Employee Engagement and leadership competence as prediction of leader’s performance. The performance of a leader is measured by means of achievement on objective strategies in terms of 4 perspectives (financial and non-financial perspectives) in a Balanced Score Card (BSC). It took one year during a business plan of year 2014, from January to December 2014. The result of this research is there is correlation between Job Resource (coefficient value of Social Support is 0.036 & coefficient value of organizational climate is 0.220) and Personal Resource (coefficient value of PsyCap is 0.513 & coefficient value of Leadership Competence is 0.249) with employee engagement. There is correlation between employee engagement (coefficient value is 0.279) and leadership competence (coefficient value is 0.581) with performance.

Keywords: organizational climate, social support, psychological capital leadership competence, employee engagement, performance, integrated textile companies

Procedia PDF Downloads 366
120 How Holton’s Thematic Analysis Can Help to Understand Why Fred Hoyle Never Accepted Big Bang Cosmology

Authors: Joao Barbosa

Abstract:

After an intense dispute between the big bang cosmology and its big rival, the steady-state cosmology, some important experimental observations, such as the determination of helium abundance in the universe and the discovery of the cosmic background radiation in the 1960s were decisive for the progressive and wide acceptance of big bang cosmology and the inevitable abandonment of steady-state cosmology. But, despite solid theoretical support and those solid experimental observations favorable to big bang cosmology, Fred Hoyle, one of the proponents of the steady-state and the main opponent of the idea of the big bang (which, paradoxically, himself he baptized), never gave up and continued to fight for the idea of a stationary (or quasi-stationary) universe until the end of his life, even after decades of widespread consensus around the big bang cosmology. We can try to understand this persistent attitude of Hoyle by applying Holton’s thematic analysis to cosmology. Holton recognizes in the scientific activity a dimension that, even unconscious or not assumed, is nevertheless very important in the work of scientists, in implicit articulation with the experimental and the theoretical dimensions of science. This is the thematic dimension, constituted by themata – concepts, methodologies, and hypotheses with a metaphysical, aesthetic, logical, or epistemological nature, associated both with the cultural context and the individual psychology of scientists. In practice, themata can be expressed through personal preferences and choices that guide the individual and collective work of scientists. Thematic analysis shows that big bang cosmology is mainly based on a set of themata consisting of evolution, finitude, life cycle, and change; the cosmology of the steady-state is based on opposite themata: steady-state, infinity, continuous existence, and constancy. The passionate controversy that these cosmological views carried out is part of an old cosmological opposition: the thematic opposition between an evolutionary view of the world (associated with Heraclitus) and a stationary view (associated with Parmenides). Personal preferences seem to have been important in this (thematic) controversy, and the thematic analysis that was developed shows that Hoyle is a very illustrative example of a life-long personal commitment to some themata, in this case to the opposite themata of the big bang cosmology. His struggle against the big bang idea was strongly based on philosophical and even religious reasons – which, in a certain sense and in a Holtonian perspective, is related to thematic preferences. In this personal and persistent struggle, Hoyle always refused the way how some experimental observations were considered decisive in favor of the big bang idea, arguing that the success of this idea is based on sociological and cultural prejudices. This Hoyle’s attitude is a personal thematic attitude, in which the acceptance or rejection of what is presented as proof or scientific fact is conditioned by themata: what is a proof or a scientific fact for one scientist is something yet to be established for another scientist who defends different or even opposites themata.

Keywords: cosmology, experimental observations, fred hoyle, interpretation, life-long personal commitment, Themata

Procedia PDF Downloads 69
119 Emotional, Behavioural and Social Development: Modality of Hierarchy of Needs in Supporting Parents with Special Needs

Authors: Fadzilah Abdul Rahman

Abstract:

Emotional development is developed between the parents and their child. Behavioural development is also developed between the parents and their child. Social Development is how parents can help their special needs child to adapt to society and to face challenges. In promoting a lifelong learning mindset, enhancing skill sets and readiness to face challenges, parents would be able to counter balance these challenges during their care giving process and better manage their expectations through understanding the hierarchy of needs modality towards a positive attitude, and in turn, improve their quality of life and participation in society. This paper aims to demonstrate how the hierarchy of needs can be applied in various situations of caregiving for parents with a special needs child.

Keywords: hierarchy of needs, parents, special needs, care-giving

Procedia PDF Downloads 226