Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 8075

Search results for: learning differences

8075 Services-Oriented Model for the Regulation of Learning

Authors: Mohamed Bendahmane, Brahim Elfalaki, Mohammed Benattou

Abstract:

One of the major sources of learners' professional difficulties is their heterogeneity. Whether on cognitive, social, cultural or emotional level, learners being part of the same group have many differences. These differences do not allow to apply the same learning process at all learners. Thus, an optimal learning path for one, is not necessarily the same for the other. We present in this paper a model-oriented service to offer to each learner a personalized learning path to acquire the targeted skills.

Keywords: learning path, web service, trace analysis, personalization

Procedia PDF Downloads 275
8074 Learning Disability or Learning Differences: Understanding Differences Between Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, Learning Differences, and Learning Disabilities

Authors: Jolanta Jonak, Sylvia Tolczyk

Abstract:

Students demonstrate various learning preferences and learning styles that range from visual, auditory to kinesthetic preferences. These learning preferences are further impacted by individual cognitive make up that characterizes itself in linguistic strengths, logical- special, inter-or intra- personal, just to name a few. Students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds (CLD) have an increased risk of being misunderstood by many school systems and even medical personnel. CLD students are influenced by many factors (like acculturation and experience) that may impact their achievements and functioning levels. CLD students who develop initial or basic interpersonal communication proficiency skills in the target language are even at a higher risk for being suspected of learning disability when they are underachieving academically. Research indicates that large numbers of students arenot provided the type of education and types of supports they need in order to be successful in an academicenvironment. Multiple research findings indicate that significant numbers of school staff self-reports that they do not feel adequately prepared to work with CLD students. It is extremely important for the school staff, especially school psychologists, who often are the first experts that are consulted, to be educated about overlapping symptoms and settle differences between learning difference and disability. It is equally important for medical personnel, mainly pediatricians, psychologists, and psychiatrists, to understand the subtle differences to avoid inaccurate opinions. Having the knowledge, school staff can avoid unnecessary referrals for special education evaluations and avoid inaccurate decisions about the presence of a disability. This presentation will illustrate distinctions based on research between learning differences and disabilities, how to recognize them, and how to assess for them.

Keywords: special education, learning disability, differentiation, differences

Procedia PDF Downloads 75
8073 Two Different Learning Environments: Arabic International Students Coping with the Australian Learning System

Authors: H. van Rensburg, B. Adcock, B. Al Mansouri

Abstract:

This paper discusses the impact of pedagogical and learning differences on Arabic international students’ (AIS) learning when they come to study in Australia. It describes the difference in teaching and learning methods between the students’ home countries in the Arabic world and Australia. There are many research papers that discuss the general experiences of international students in the western learning systems, including Australia. However, there is little research conducted specifically about AIS learning in Australia. Therefore, the data was collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with AIS who are learning at an Australian regional university in Queensland. For that reason, this paper contributes to fill a gap by reporting on the learning experiences of AIS in Australia and, more specifically, on the AIS’ pedagogical experiences. Not only discussing the learning experiences of AIS, but also discussing the cultural adaptation using the Oberg’s cultural adaptation model. This paper suggests some learning strategies that may benefit AIS and academic lecturers when teaching students from a completely different culture and language.

Keywords: arabic international students, cultural adaption, learning differences, learning systems

Procedia PDF Downloads 508
8072 Investigating The Use Of Socially Assistive Robots To Support Learner Engagement For Students With Learning Disabilities In One-to-one Instructional Settings

Authors: Jennifer Fane, Mike Gray, Melissa Sager

Abstract:

Children with diagnosed or suspected learning disabilities frequently experience significant skill gaps in foundational learning areas such as reading, writing, and math. Remedial one-to-one instruction is a highly effective means of supporting children with learning differences in building these foundational skills and closing the learning gap between them and their same-age peers. However, due to the learning challenges children with learning disabilities face, and ensuing challenges with self-confidence, many children with learning differences struggle with motivation and self-regulation within remedial one-to-one learning environments - despite the benefits of these sessions. Socially Assistive Robots (SARs) are an innovative educational technology tool that has been trialled in a range of educational settings to support diverse learning needs. Yet, little is known about the impact of SARs on the learning of children with learning differences in a one-to-one remedial instructional setting. This study sought to explore the impact of SARs on the engagement of children (n=9) with learning differences attending one-to-one remedial instruction sessions at a non-profit remedial education provider. The study used a mixed-methods design to explore learner engagement during learning tasks both with and without the use of a SAR to investigate how the use of SARs impacts student learning. The study took place over five weeks, with each session within the study followed the same procedure with the SAR acting as a teaching assistant when in use. Data from the study included analysis of time-sample video segments of the instructional sessions, instructor recorded information about the student’s progress towards their session learning goal and student self-reported mood and energy levels before and after the session. Analysis of the findings indicates that the use of SARs resulted in fewer instances of off-task behaviour and less need for instructor re-direction during learning tasks, allowing students to work in more sustained ways towards their learning goals. This initial research indicates that the use of SARs does have a material and measurable impact on learner engagement for children with learning differences and that further exploration of the impact of SARs during one-to-one remedial instruction is warranted.

Keywords: engagement, learning differences, learning disabilities, instruction, social robotics.

Procedia PDF Downloads 106
8071 Social Skills for Students with and without Learning Disabilities in Primary Education in Saudi Arabia

Authors: Omer Agail

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to assess the social skills of students with and without learning disabilities in primary education in Saudi Arabia. A Social Skills Rating Scale for Teachers Form (SSRS-TF) was used to evaluate students' social skills as perceived by teachers. A randomly-selected sample was chosen from students with and without learning disabilities. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the demographic characteristics of participants. Analysis indicated that there were statistically significant differences in SSRS-TF by academic status, i.e. students with learning disabilities exhibit less social skills compared to students without learning disabilities. In addition, analysis indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in SSRS-TF by gender. A conclusion and recommendations are presented.

Keywords: primary education, students with learning disabilities, social skills, social competence

Procedia PDF Downloads 187
8070 Active Learning: Increase Learning through Engagement

Authors: Jihan Albayati, Kim Abdullah

Abstract:

This poster focuses on the significance of active learning strategies and their usage in the ESL classroom. Active learning is a big shift from traditional lecturing to active student engagement which can enhance and enrich student learning; therefore, engaging students is the core of this approach. Students learn more when they participate in the process of learning such as discussions, debates, analysis, synthesis, or any form of activity that requires student involvement. In order to achieve active learning, teachers can use different instructional strategies that are conducive to learning and the selection of these strategies depends on student learning outcomes. Active learning techniques must be carefully designed and integrated into the classroom to increase critical thinking and student participation. This poster provides a concise definition of active learning and its importance, instructional strategies, active learning techniques and their impact on student engagement. Also, it demonstrates the differences between passive and active learners.

Keywords: active learning, learner engagement, student-centered, teaching strategies

Procedia PDF Downloads 380
8069 Measuring Learning Independence and Transition through the First Year in Architecture

Authors: Duaa Al Maani, Andrew Roberts

Abstract:

Students in higher education are expected to learn actively and independently. Whilst quite work has been done to understand the perceptions of students’ learning transition regarding independent learning, to author’s best knowledge, it seems relatively few published research on independent learning in studio-based subjects such as architecture. Another major issue in independent learning research concerned the inconsistency in terminology; there appears to be a paucity of research on its definition, challenges, and tools within the UK university sector. It is not always clear how independent learning works in practice, or what are the challenges that face students toward being independent learners. Accordingly, this paper seeks to highlight these problems by analyzing previous and current literature of independent learning, in addition, to measure students’ independence at the very begging of their first academic year and compare it with their level of learning independence at the end of the same year. Eighty-seven student enrolled in 2017/2018 at Cardiff University completed the Autonomous Learning Questionnaire in order to measure their level of learning independence. Students’ initial responses were very positive and showed high level of learning independence. Interestingly, these responses significantly decreased at the end of the year. Time management was the most obvious challenge facing students transition into higher education, and contrary to expectations, we found no effect of student maturity on their level of independence. Moreover, we found no significant differences among students’ gender, but we did find differences among nationalities.

Keywords: autonomous learning, first year, learning independence, transition

Procedia PDF Downloads 72
8068 Effects of Ubiquitous 360° Learning Environment on Clinical Histotechnology Competence

Authors: Mari A. Virtanen, Elina Haavisto, Eeva Liikanen, Maria Kääriäinen

Abstract:

Rapid technological development and digitalization has affected also on higher education. During last twenty years multiple of electronic and mobile learning (e-learning, m-learning) platforms have been developed and have become prevalent in many universities and in the all fields of education. Ubiquitous learning (u-learning) is not that widely known or used. Ubiquitous learning environments (ULE) are the new era of computer-assisted learning. They are based on ubiquitous technology and computing that fuses the learner seamlessly into learning process by using sensing technology as tags, badges or barcodes and smart devices like smartphones and tablets. ULE combines real-life learning situations into virtual aspects and can be flexible used in anytime and anyplace. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ubiquitous 360 o learning environment on higher education students’ clinical histotechnology competence. A quasi-experimental study design was used. 57 students in biomedical laboratory science degree program was assigned voluntarily to experiment (n=29) and to control group (n=28). Experimental group studied via ubiquitous 360o learning environment and control group via traditional web-based learning environment (WLE) in a 8-week educational intervention. Ubiquitous 360o learning environment (ULE) combined authentic learning environment (histotechnology laboratory), digital environment (virtual laboratory), virtual microscope, multimedia learning content, interactive communication tools, electronic library and quick response barcodes placed into authentic laboratory. Web-based learning environment contained equal content and components with the exception of the use of mobile device, interactive communication tools and quick response barcodes. Competence of clinical histotechnology was assessed by using knowledge test and self-report developed for this study. Data was collected electronically before and after clinical histotechnology course and analysed by using descriptive statistics. Differences among groups were identified by using Wilcoxon test and differences between groups by using Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistically significant differences among groups were identified in both groups (p<0.001). Competence scores in post-test were higher in both groups, than in pre-test. Differences between groups were very small and not statistically significant. In this study the learning environment have developed based on 360o technology and successfully implemented into higher education context. And students’ competence increases when ubiquitous learning environment were used. In the future, ULE can be used as a learning management system for any learning situation in health sciences. More studies are needed to show differences between ULE and WLE.

Keywords: competence, higher education, histotechnology, ubiquitous learning, u-learning, 360o

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8067 Active Learning Role on Strategic I-Map Thinking in Developing Reasoning Thinking and the Intrinsic-Motivation Orientation

Authors: Khaled Alotaibi

Abstract:

This paper deals with developing reasoning thinking and the intrinsic-extrinsic motivation for learning, and enhancing the academic achievement of a sample of students at Teachers' College in King Saud University. The study sample included 58 students who were divided randomly into two groups; one was an experimental group with 20 students and the other was a control group with 22 students. The following tools were used: e-courses by using I-map, Reasoning Thinking Tes, questionnaire to measure the intrinsic-extrinsic motivation for learning and an academic achievement test. Experimental group was taught using e-courses by using I-map, while the control group was taught by using traditional education. The results showed that: - There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in Reasoning thinking skills. - There were statistically significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in the intrinsic-extrinsic motivation for learning in favor of the experimental group. - There were statistically significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in academic achievement in favor of the experimental group.

Keywords: reasoning, thinking, intrinsic motivation, active learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 315
8066 The Relationships between How and Why Students Learn and Academic Achievement

Authors: S. Chee Choy, Daljeet Singh Sedhu

Abstract:

This study examines the relationships between how and why students learned and academic achievement for 2646 university students from various faculties. The LALQ, a self-report measure of student approaches to learning was administered and academic achievement data were obtained from student CGPA. The results showed significant differences in the approach to learning of male and female students. How and why students learned can influence their achievement and efficacy as well. High and low achievers have different learning behaviours. High female achievers were more likely to learn for a better future and be persistent in it. Meanwhile high male achievers were more likely to seek approval from their peers and be more confident about graduating on time from their university. The implications of individual differences and limitations of the study are discussed.

Keywords: student learning, learner awareness, student achievement, LALQ

Procedia PDF Downloads 265
8065 Learning Environment and Motivation of Cavite National High School Students

Authors: Madelaine F. Gatchalian, Mary Jane D. Tepora

Abstract:

This study was designed to determine the relationship between learning environment and motivation of CNHS, SY 2012-2013. There were 376 respondents taken randomly. Frequency distribution, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Mann Whitney Test, Kruskall Wallis One-way ANOVA and Spearman Rank Correlational Coefficient were used in analyzing the data. As to age, most of the respondents were 13 years old while female students outnumbered the male students. Majority of parents’ educational attainment of CNHS students were high school/vocational graduates. Most fathers worked in the private sector, while majority of the mothers were unemployed whose family income range from Php 5,000.00 to Php 14,999.00. Most of the respondents were first child composed of five family members. Findings showed no significant differences in perceived learning environment when respondents were grouped in terms of age, sex, parents’ educational attainment, parents’ occupation, sibling order and number of family members. Only monthly family income showed significant differences in perceived learning environment. There are no significant differences in perceived learning motivation when respondents were grouped in terms of age, sex, parents’ educational attainment (father), parents’ occupation (father), sibling order, and number of family members. Parents’ educational attainment (mother), parents’ occupation (mother) and monthly family income showed significant differences in perceived learning motivation. There is significant relationship between the six subscales of perceived learning environment, namely: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, task orientation, cooperation and equity and perceived learning motivation of CNHS students, SY, 2012-2013. The results of this study indicated that learning environment including student cohesiveness, teachers support, involvement, task orientation, cooperation and equity is significantly related to students’ learning motivation.

Keywords: learning environment, motivation, demographic profile, secondary students

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8064 Experimental Verification of the Relationship between Physiological Indexes and the Presence or Absence of an Operation during E-learning

Authors: Masaki Omata, Shumma Hosokawa

Abstract:

An experiment to verify the relationships between physiological indexes of an e-learner and the presence or absence of an operation during e-learning is described. Electroencephalogram (EEG), hemoencephalography (HEG), skin conductance (SC), and blood volume pulse (BVP) values were measured while participants performed experimental learning tasks. The results show that there are significant differences between the SC values when reading with clicking on learning materials and the SC values when reading without clicking, and between the HEG ratio when reading (with and without clicking) and the HEG ratio when resting for four of five participants. We conclude that the SC signals can be used to estimate whether or not a learner is performing an active task and that the HEG ratios can be used to estimate whether a learner is learning.

Keywords: e-learning, physiological index, physiological signal, state of learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 300
8063 Information and Communication Technology Learning between Parents and High School Students

Authors: Yu-Mei Tseng, Chih-Chun Wu

Abstract:

As information and communication technology (ICT) has become a part of people’s lives, most teenagers born after the 1980s and grew up in internet generation are called digital natives. Meanwhile, those teenagers’ parents are called digital immigrants. They need to keep learning new skills of ICT. This study investigated that high school students helped their parents set up social network services (SNS) and taught them how to use ICT. This study applied paper and pencil anonymous questionnaires that asked the ICT learning and ICT products using in high school students’ parents. The sample size was 2,621 high school students, including 1,360 (51.9%) males and 1,261 (48.1%) females. The sample was from 12 high school and vocational high school in central Taiwan. Results from paired sample t-tests demonstrated regardless genders, both male and female high school students help mothers set up Facebook and LINE more often than fathers. In addition, both male and female high school students taught mothers to use ICT more often than fathers. Meanwhile, both male and female high school students teach mothers to use SNS more often than fathers. The results showed that intergenerational ICT teaching occurred more often between mothers and her children than fathers. It could imply that mothers play a more important role in family ICT learning than fathers, or it could be that mothers need more help regarding ICT than fathers. As for gender differences, results from the independent t-tests showed that female high school students were more likely than male ones to help their parents setup Facebook and LINE. In addition, compared to male high school students, female ones were more likely to teach their parents to use smartphone, Facebook and LINE. However, no gender differences were detected in teaching mothers. The gender differences results suggested that female teenagers offer more helps to their parents regarding ICT learning than their male counterparts. As for area differences, results from the independent t-tests showed that the high school in remote area students were more likely than metropolitan ones to teach parents to use computer, search engine and download files of audio and video. The area differences results might indicate that remote area students were more likely to teach their parents how to use ICT. The results from this study encourage children to help and teach their parents with ICT products.

Keywords: adult ICT learning, family ICT learning, ICT learning, urban-rural gap

Procedia PDF Downloads 115
8062 Universal Design for Learning: Its Impact for Enhanced Performance in General Psychology

Authors: Jose Gay D. Gallego

Abstract:

This study examined the learning performance in General Psychology of 297 freshmen of the CPSU-Main through the Pre and Post Tests. The instructional intervention via Universal Design for Learning (UDL) was applied to 33% (97 out of 297) of these freshmen as the Treatment Group while the 67% (200) belonged to the Control Group for traditional instructions. Statistical inferences utilized one-way Analysis of Variance for mean differences; Pearson R Correlations for bivariate relationships, and; Factor Analysis for significant components that contributed most to the Universal Design for Learning instructions. Findings showed very high levels of students’ acquired UDL skills. Results in the pre test in General Psychology, respectively, were low and average when grouped into low and high achievers. There was no significant mean difference in the acquired nine UDL components when categorized into seven colleges to generalize that between colleges they were on the same very high levels. Significant differences were found in three test areas in General Psychology in eight colleges whose students in College of teacher education taking the lead in the learning performance. Significant differences were also traced in the post test in favor of the students in the treatment group. This proved that UDL really impacted the learning performance of the low achieving students. Significant correlations were revealed between the components of UDL and General Psychology. There were twenty four significant itemized components that contributed most to UDL instructional interventions. Implications were emphasized to maximizing the principles of UDL with the contention of thoughtful planning related to the four curricular pillars of UDL: (a) instructional goals, (b) instructional delivery methods, (c) instructional materials, and (d) student assessments.

Keywords: universal design for learning, enhanced performance, teaching innovation, technology in education, social science area

Procedia PDF Downloads 190
8061 Investigating Gender Differences in M-Learning Gameplay Adoption

Authors: Chih-Ping Chen

Abstract:

Despite the increasing popularity of and interest in mobile games, there has been little research that evaluates gender differences in users’ actual preferences for mobile game content, and the factors that influence entertainment and mobile-learning habits. To fill this void, this study examines different gender users’ experience of mobile English learning game adoption in order to identify the areas of development in Taiwan, using Uses and Gratification Theory, Expectation Confirmation Theory and experiential value. The integration of these theories forms the basis of an extended research concept. Users’ responses to questions about cognitive perceptions, confirmation, gratifications and continuous use were collected and analyzed with various factors derived from the theories.

Keywords: expectation confirmation theory, experiential value, gender difference, mobile game, uses and gratification

Procedia PDF Downloads 242
8060 E-Learning in Primary Science: Teachers versus Students

Authors: Winnie Wing Mui So, Yu Chen

Abstract:

This study investigated primary school teachers’ and students’ perceptions of science learning in an e-learning environment. This study used a multiple case study design and involved eight science teachers and their students from four Hong Kong primary schools. The science topics taught included ‘season and weather’ ‘force and movement’, ‘solar and lunar eclipse’ and ‘living things and habitats’. Data were collected through lesson observations, interviews with teachers, and interviews with students. Results revealed some differences between the teachers’ and the students’ perceptions regarding the usefulness of e-learning resources, the organization of student-centred activities, and the impact on engagement and interactions in lessons. The findings have implications for the more effective creation of e-learning environments for science teaching and learning in primary schools.

Keywords: e-learning, science education, teacher' and students' perceptions, primary schools

Procedia PDF Downloads 118
8059 Individual Differences and Paired Learning in Virtual Environments

Authors: Patricia M. Boechler, Heather M. Gautreau

Abstract:

In this research study, postsecondary students completed an information learning task in an avatar-based 3D virtual learning environment. Three factors were of interest in relation to learning; 1) the influence of collaborative vs. independent conditions, 2) the influence of the spatial arrangement of the virtual environment (linear, random and clustered), and 3) the relationship of individual differences such as spatial skill, general computer experience and video game experience to learning. Students completed pretest measures of prior computer experience and prior spatial skill. Following the premeasure administration, students were given instruction to move through the virtual environment and study all the material within 10 information stations. In the collaborative condition, students proceeded in randomly assigned pairs, while in the independent condition they proceeded alone. After this learning phase, all students individually completed a multiple choice test to determine information retention. The overall results indicated that students in pairs did not perform any better or worse than independent students. As far as individual differences, only spatial ability predicted the performance of students. General computer experience and video game experience did not. Taking a closer look at the pairs and spatial ability, comparisons were made on pairs high/matched spatial ability, pairs low/matched spatial ability and pairs that were mismatched on spatial ability. The results showed that both high/matched pairs and mismatched pairs outperformed low/matched pairs. That is, if a pair had even one individual with strong spatial ability they would perform better than pairs with only low spatial ability individuals. This suggests that, in virtual environments, the specific individuals that are paired together are important for performance outcomes. The paper also includes a discussion of trends within the data that have implications for virtual environment education.

Keywords: avatar-based, virtual environment, paired learning, individual differences

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8058 Learners and Teachers Experiences in Collaborative Learning

Authors: Bengi Sonyel, Kheder Kasem

Abstract:

Nowadays technology is growing so fast. Everybody agrees that technology should be enhanced more in educational field in order to achieve maximum level of teaching and learning effectiveness. Collaborative learning is one of the most important subjects that have been discussed widely in the last 20 years. In this growing of technology and the widely spread of e-learning systems most of face-to-face processes are changing to be completely online base. Online collaborative learning considered one of the new feature that applied recently in some e-Learning systems but still there are much differences between face-to-face instance of collaborative learning and what really occur and happen in networked online environment.In this research we will compare face-to-face collaborative learning with online collaborative learning to define the key success for achieving course’s outcomes. We will also study the current teachers and students experience in today e-Learning systems, more specifically in online collaborative system and study them interaction to today’s technology that related to education. We will apply quantitative and qualitative research method in order to get accurate results. Finally we will gather all of our findings, analyze it and try to find the advantages and disadvantages as well as the current problems and possible solutions.

Keywords: collaborative learning, learning by doing, technology, teachers, learners experiences

Procedia PDF Downloads 418
8057 Comparative Outlook of Teacher Education in Nigeria and India

Authors: Muhammad Badamasi Abdullahi

Abstract:

Teacher education, both pre- and in-service programs, is offered in many countries of the world by different teacher education institutions as declared in the Policies on Education of the countries. However, differences exist from one country to another as a result of some factors peculiar to them. Notwithstanding, there also exist similarities among them in regard to teacher education. This paper is expected to dig into teacher education programs in Nigeria and India so that areas of similarities and differences would be highlighted as well as provide a venue for possible recommendation of both countries to learn from one another. All this is directed towards providing a no -border approach in enhancing effective teaching and learning.

Keywords: teacher education, teaching and learning, pre-service, in-service

Procedia PDF Downloads 262
8056 Individual Differences and Language Learning Strategies

Authors: Nilgun Karatas, Bihter Sakin

Abstract:

In this study, the relationships between the use of language learning strategies and English language exit exam success were investigated in the university EFL learners’ context. The study was conducted at Fatih University Prep School. To collect data 3 classes from the A1 module in English language classes completed a questionnaire known as the English Language Learning Strategy Inventory or ELLSI. The data for the present study were collected from the preparatory class students who are studying English as a second language at the School of Foreign Languages. The students were placed into four different levels of English, namely A1, A2, B1, and B2 level of English competency according to European Union Language Proficiency Standard, by means of their English placement test results. The Placement test was conveyed at the beginning of the spring semester in 2014-2015.The ELLSI consists of 30 strategy items which students are asked to rate from 1 (low frequency) to 5 (high frequency) according to how often they use them. The questionnaire and exit exam results were entered onto SPSS and analyzed for mean frequencies and statistical differences. Spearman and Pearson correlation were used in a detailed way. There were no statistically significant results between the frequency of strategy use and exit exam results. However, most questions correlate at a significant level with some of the questions.

Keywords: individual differences, language learning strategies, Fatih University, English language

Procedia PDF Downloads 407
8055 Mobile Phones and Language Learning: A Qualitative Meta-Analysis of Studies Published between 2008 and 2012 in the Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobile Learning

Authors: Lucia Silveira Alda

Abstract:

This research aims to analyze critically a set of studies published in the Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobile Learning of IADIS, from 2008 until 2012, which addresses the issue of foreign language learning mediated by mobile phones. The theoretical review of this study is based on the Vygotskian assumptions about tools and mediated learning and the concepts of mobile learning, CALL and MALL. In addition, the diffusion rates of the mobile phone and especially its potential are considered. Through systematic review and meta-analysis, this research intended to identify similarities and differences between the identified characteristics in the studies on the subject of language learning and mobile phone. From the analysis of the results, this study verifies that the mobile phone stands out for its mobility and portability. Furthermore, this device presented positive aspects towards student motivation in language learning. The studies were favorable to mobile phone use for learning. It was also found that the challenges in using this tool are not technical, but didactic and methodological, including the need to reflect on practical proposals. The findings of this study may direct further research in the area of language learning mediated by mobile phones.

Keywords: language learning, mobile learning, mobile phones, technology

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8054 Developing EFL Research Skills of Pre-Master Students through a Suggested Quest Based Learning Strategy

Authors: Heba Mustafa Abdullah

Abstract:

The research aimed at examining the effect of a using a quest based learning strategy on developing EFL Pre-Master Students. The study adopted the quasi-experimental design. The sample of the research consists of a group of 30 students enrolled in Pre-Master program, Curriculum and EFL Instruction Department, Faculty of Graduate Studies in Education Tools of the study included a EFL research skills checklist and EFL research skills test. Results revealed that there were statistically significant differences at 0.01 levels with regard to some research skills. Results were discussed in relation to several factors that affected the language learning process. Finally, the research provided beneficial contributions in relation to manipulating e-learning technologies in general and Quest based learning strategy in particular with respect to EFL research skills.

Keywords: English as foreign language, e-Learning, research skills, quest based learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 353
8053 A Framework for SQL Learning: Linking Learning Taxonomy, Cognitive Model and Cross Cutting Factors

Authors: Huda Al Shuaily, Karen Renaud

Abstract:

Databases comprise the foundation of most software systems. System developers inevitably write code to query these databases. The de facto language for querying is SQL and this, consequently, is the default language taught by higher education institutions. There is evidence that learners find it hard to master SQL, harder than mastering other programming languages such as Java. Educators do not agree about explanations for this seeming anomaly. Further investigation may well reveal the reasons. In this paper, we report on our investigations into how novices learn SQL, the actual problems they experience when writing SQL, as well as the differences between expert and novice SQL query writers. We conclude by presenting a model of SQL learning that should inform the instructional material design process better to support the SQL learning process.

Keywords: pattern, SQL, learning, model

Procedia PDF Downloads 162
8052 Metacognition Skill on Collaborative Study with Self Evaluation

Authors: Suratno

Abstract:

Metacognition thinking skills should be developed early on in learning. The aim of research builds metacognition thinking skills through collaborative learning with self-evaluation. Approach to action research study involving 32 middle school students in Jember Indonesia. Indicators metacognition skills consist of planning, information management strategies, comprehension monitoring, and debugging strategies. Data were analyzed by t test and analysis of instructional videos. Results of the study here were significant differences in metacognition skills before and after the implementation of collaborative learning with self-evaluation. Analysis instructional video showing the difference artifacts of student learning activities to learning before and after implementation of collaborative learning with self-evaluation. Self-evaluation makes students familiar practice thinking skills metacognition.

Keywords: metacognition, collaborative, evaluation, thinking skills

Procedia PDF Downloads 256
8051 Augmented Reality and Its Impact on Education

Authors: Aliakbar Alijarahi, Ali Khaleghi, Azadehe Afrasiyabi

Abstract:

One of the emerging technologies in the field of education that can be effectively profitable, called augmented reality, where the combination of real world and virtual images in real time produces new concepts that can facilitate learning. The paper, providing an introduction to the general concept of augmented reality, aims at surveying its capabitities in different areas, with an emphasis on Education, It seems quite necessary to have comparative study on virtual/e-learning and augmented reality and conclude their differences in education methods. As an review article, the paper is composed, instead of producing new concepts, to sum-up and analayze accomplished works related to the subject.

Keywords: augmented reality, education, virtual learning, e-learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 250
8050 A Review of Machine Learning for Big Data

Authors: Devatha Kalyan Kumar, Aravindraj D., Sadathulla A.

Abstract:

Big data are now rapidly expanding in all engineering and science and many other domains. The potential of large or massive data is undoubtedly significant, make sense to require new ways of thinking and learning techniques to address the various big data challenges. Machine learning is continuously unleashing its power in a wide range of applications. In this paper, the latest advances and advancements in the researches on machine learning for big data processing. First, the machine learning techniques methods in recent studies, such as deep learning, representation learning, transfer learning, active learning and distributed and parallel learning. Then focus on the challenges and possible solutions of machine learning for big data.

Keywords: active learning, big data, deep learning, machine learning

Procedia PDF Downloads 309
8049 Irbid National University Students’ Beliefs about English Language Learning

Authors: Khaleel Bader Bataineh

Abstract:

Past studies have maintained that the Arab learners' beliefs about language learning hold vital effects on their performance. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate the language learning beliefs of Irbid National University students. It aimed at identifying the language learning beliefs according to gender. This study is a descriptive design that employed survey questionnaire of Language Learning Beliefs Inventory (BALLI). The data were elicited from 83 English major students during the class sessions. The data were analyzed using an SPSS program in which frequency analysis and t-test were performed to examine the students’ responses. Thus, the major findings of this research indicated that there is a variation in responses with regards to the subjects’ beliefs about English learning. Also, the findings show significant differences in four questionnaire items according to gender. It is hoped that the findings provide valuable insights to educators about the learners’ beliefs which assist them to develop the teaching and learning English language process in Jordan universities.

Keywords: foreign language, students’ beliefs, language learning, Arab students

Procedia PDF Downloads 410
8048 Preservice Science Teachers' Understanding of Equitable Assessment

Authors: Kemal Izci, Ahmet Oguz Akturk

Abstract:

Learning is dependent on cognitive and physical differences as well as other differences such as ethnicity, language, and culture. Furthermore, these differences also influence how students show their learning. Assessment is an integral part of learning and teaching process and is essential for effective instruction. In order to provide effective instruction, teachers need to provide equal assessment opportunities for all students to see their learning difficulties and use them to modify instruction to aid learning. Successful assessment practices are dependent upon the knowledge and value of teachers. Therefore, in order to use assessment to assess and support diverse students learning, preservice and inservice teachers should hold an appropriate understanding of equitable assessment. In order to prepare teachers to help them support diverse student learning, as a first step, this study aims to explore how preservice teachers’ understand equitable assessment. 105 preservice science teachers studying at teacher preparation program in a large university located at Eastern part of Turkey participated in the current study. A questionnaire, preservice teachers’ reflection papers and interviews served as data sources for this study. All collected data qualitatively analyzed to develop themes that illustrate preservice science teachers’ understanding of equitable assessment. Results of the study showed that preservice teachers mostly emphasized fairness including fairness in grading and fairness in asking questions not out of covered concepts for equitable assessment. However, most of preservice teachers do not show an understanding of equity for providing equal opportunities for all students to display their understanding of related content. For some preservice teachers providing different opportunities (providing extra time for non-native speaking students) for some students seems to be unfair for other students and therefore, these kinds of refinements do not need to be used. The results of the study illustrated that preservice science teachers mostly understand equitable assessment as fairness and less highlight the role of using equitable assessment to support all student learning, which is more important in order to improve students’ achievement of science. Therefore, we recommend that more opportunities should be provided for preservice teachers engage in a more broad understanding of equitable assessment and learn how to use equitable assessment practices to aid and support all students learning trough classroom assessment.

Keywords: science teaching, equitable assessment, assessment literacy, preservice science teachers

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8047 Leveraging Learning Analytics to Inform Learning Design in Higher Education

Authors: Mingming Jiang

Abstract:

This literature review aims to offer an overview of existing research on learning analytics and learning design, the alignment between the two, and how learning analytics has been leveraged to inform learning design in higher education. Current research suggests a need to create more alignment and integration between learning analytics and learning design in order to not only ground learning analytics on learning sciences but also enable data-driven decisions in learning design to improve learning outcomes. In addition, multiple conceptual frameworks have been proposed to enhance the synergy and alignment between learning analytics and learning design. Future research should explore this synergy further in the unique context of higher education, identifying learning analytics metrics in higher education that can offer insight into learning processes, evaluating the effect of learning analytics outcomes on learning design decision-making in higher education, and designing learning environments in higher education that make the capturing and deployment of learning analytics outcomes more efficient.

Keywords: learning analytics, learning design, big data in higher education, online learning environments

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8046 The effect of Reflective Thinking on Iranian EFL Learners’ Language Learning Strategy Use, L2 Proficiency, and Beliefs about Second Language Learning and Teaching

Authors: Mohammad Hadi Mahmoodi, Mojtaba Farahani

Abstract:

The present study aimed at investigating whether reflective thinking differentiates Iranian EFL learners regarding language learning strategy use, beliefs about language learning and teaching, and L2 proficiency. To this end, the researcher adopted a mixed method approach. First, 94 EFL learners were asked to complete Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (Kember et al., 2000), Beliefs about Language Learning and Teaching Inventory (Horwitz, 1985), Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (Oxford, 1990), and Oxford Quick Placement Test. The results of three separate one-way ANOVAs indicated that reflective thinking significantly differentiates Iranian EFL learners concerning: (a)language learning strategy use, (b) beliefs about language learning and teaching, and (c) general language proficiency. Furthermore, to see where the differences lay, three separate post-hoc Tukey tests were run the results of which showed that learners with different levels of reflectivity (high, mid, and low) were significantly different from each other in all three dependent variables. Finally, to increase the validity of the findings thirty of the participants were interviewed and the results were analyzed through template organizing style method (Crabtree & Miller, 1999). The results of the interview analysis supported the results of quantitative data analysis.

Keywords: reflective thinking, language learning strategy use, beliefs toward language learning and teaching

Procedia PDF Downloads 576