Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 16

Search results for: hotwire anemometry

16 Turbulent Boundary Layer over 3D Sinusoidal Roughness

Authors: Misarah Abdelaziz, L Djenidi, Mergen H. Ghayesh, Rey Chin

Abstract:

Measurements of a turbulent boundary layer over 3D sinusoidal roughness are performed for friction Reynolds numbers ranging from 650 < Reτ < 2700. This surface was fabricated by a Multicam CNC Router machine of an acrylic sheet to have an amplitude of k/2 = 0.8 mm and an equal wavelength of 8k in both streamwise and spanwise directions, a 0.6 mm stepover and 12 mm ball nose cutter was used. Single hotwire anemometry measurements are done at one location x=1.5 m downstream at different freestream velocities under zero-pressure gradient conditions. As expected, the roughness causes a downward shift on the wall-unit normalised streamwise mean velocity profile when compared to the smooth wall profile. The shift is increasing with increasing Reτ, 1.8 < ∆U+ < 6.2. The coefficient of friction is almost constant at all cases Cf = 0.0042 ± 0.0002. The results show a gradual reduction in the inner peak of profiles with increasing Reτ until fully destruction at Reτ of 2700.

Keywords: hotwire, roughness, TBL, ZPG

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15 Experimental Investigation of Tip-Speed-Ratio Effects on Wake Dynamics of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine

Authors: Paul Bayron, Richard Kelso, Rey Chin

Abstract:

Wind tunnel experiments were performed in the KC closed-circuit wind tunnel in the University of Adelaide to study the influence of tip-speed-ratio (

Keywords: hotwire anemometry, wake dynamics, wind tunnel, wind turbines

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14 The Structure and Development of a Wing Tip Vortex under the Effect of Synthetic Jet Actuation

Authors: Marouen Dghim, Mohsen Ferchichi

Abstract:

The effect of synthetic jet actuation on the roll-up and the development of a wing tip vortex downstream a square-tipped rectangular wing was investigated experimentally using hotwire anemometry. The wing is equipped with a hallow cavity designed to generate a high aspect ratio synthetic jets blowing at an angles with respect to the spanwise direction. The structure of the wing tip vortex under the effect of fluidic actuation was examined at a chord Reynolds number Re_c=8×10^4. An extensive qualitative study on the effect of actuation on the spanwise pressure distribution at c⁄4 was achieved using pressure scanner measurements in order to determine the optimal actuation parameters namely, the blowing momentum coefficient, Cμ, and the non-dimensionalized actuation frequency, F^+. A qualitative study on the effect of actuation parameters on the spanwise pressure distribution showed that optimal actuation frequencies of the synthetic jet were found within the range amplified by both long and short wave instabilities where spanwise pressure coefficients exhibited a considerable decrease by up to 60%. The vortex appeared larger and more diffuse than that of the natural vortex case. Operating the synthetic jet seemed to introduce unsteadiness and turbulence into the vortex core. Based on the ‘a priori’ optimal selected parameters, results of the hotwire wake survey indicated that the actuation achieved a reduction and broadening of the axial velocity deficit. A decrease in the peak tangential velocity associated with an increase in the vortex core radius was reported as a result of the accelerated radial transport of angular momentum. Peak vorticity level near the core was also found to be largely diffused as a direct result of the increased turbulent mixing within the vortex. The wing tip vortex a exhibited a reduced strength and a diffused core as a direct result of increased turbulent mixing due to the presence of turbulent small scale vortices within its core. It is believed that the increased turbulence within the vortex due to the synthetic jet control was the main mechanism associated with the decreased strength and increased size of the wing tip vortex as it evolves downstream. A comparison with a ‘non-optimal’ case was included to demonstrate the effectiveness of selecting the appropriate control parameters. The Synthetic Jet will be operated at various actuation configurations and an extensive parametric study is projected to determine the optimal actuation parameters.

Keywords: flow control, hotwire anemometry, synthetic jet, wing tip vortex

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13 Development of Advanced Linear Calibration Technique for Air Flow Sensing by Using CTA-Based Hot Wire Anemometry

Authors: Ming-Jong Tsai, T. M. Wu, R. C. Chu

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to develop an Advanced linear calibration Technique for air flow sensing by using CTA-based Hot wire Anemometry. It contains a host PC with Human Machine Interface, a wind tunnel, a wind speed controller, an automatic data acquisition module, and nonlinear calibration model. To improve the fitting error by using single fitting polynomial, this study proposes a Multiple three-order Polynomial Fitting Method (MPFM) for fitting the non-linear output of a CTA-based Hot wire Anemometry. The CTA-based anemometer with built-in fitting parameters is installed in the wind tunnel, and the wind speed is controlled by the PC-based controller. The Hot-Wire anemometer's thermistor resistance change is converted into a voltage signal or temperature differences, and then sent to the PC through a DAQ card. After completion measurements of original signal, the Multiple polynomial mathematical coefficients can be automatically calculated, and then sent into the micro-processor in the Hot-Wire anemometer. Finally, the corrected Hot-Wire anemometer is verified for the linearity, the repeatability, error percentage, and the system outputs quality control reports.

Keywords: flow rate sensing, hot wire, constant temperature anemometry (CTA), linear calibration, multiple three-order polynomial fitting method (MPFM), temperature compensation

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12 Contribution to Experiments of a Free Surface Supercritical Flow over an Uneven Bottom

Authors: M. Bougamouza, M. Bouhadef, T. Zitoun

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to examine, through experimentation in the laboratory, the supercritical flow in the presence of an obstacle in a rectangular channel. The supercritical regime in the whole hydraulic channel is achieved by adding a convergent. We will observe the influence of the obstacle shape and dimension on the characteristics of the supercritical flow, mainly the free-surface elevation and the velocity profile. The velocity measurements have been conducted with the one dimension laser anemometry technique.

Keywords: experiments, free-surface flow, hydraulic channel, uneven bottom, laser anemometry, supercritical regime

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11 Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Airflow Inside Car Cabin

Authors: Mokhtar Djeddou, Amine Mehel, Georges Fokoua, Anne Tanière, Patrick Chevrier

Abstract:

Commuters' exposure to air pollution, particularly to particle matter, inside vehicles is a significant health issue. Assessing particles concentrations and characterizing their distribution is an important first step to understand and propose solutions to improve car cabin air quality. It is known that particles dynamics is intimately driven by particles-turbulence interactions. In order to analyze and model pollutants distribution inside the car the cabin, it is crucialto examine first the single-phase flow topology and turbulence characteristics. Within this context, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to model airflow inside a full-scale car cabin using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)approach combined with the first order Realizable k- εmodel to close the RANS equations. To validate the numerical model, a campaign of velocity field measurements at different locations in the front and back of the car cabin has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry technique. Comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement of velocity profiles. Additionally, visualization of streamlines shows the formation of jet flow developing out of the dashboard air vents and the formation of large vortex structures, particularly in the back seats compartment. These vortex structures could play a key role in the accumulation and clustering of particles in a turbulent flow

Keywords: car cabin, CFD, hot wire anemometry, vortical flow

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10 Experimental Study of Near Wake of Wind Turbines

Authors: Ramin Rezaei, Terry Ng, Abdollah Afjeh

Abstract:

Near wake development of a wind turbine affects the aerodynamic loads on the tower and the wind turbine. Design considerations of both isolated wind turbines and wind farms must include unsteady wake flow conditions under which the turbines must operate. The consequent aerodynamic loads could lead to over design of wind turbines and adversely affect the cost of wind turbines and, in turn, the cost of energy produced by wind turbines. Reducing the weight of turbine rotors is particularly desirable since larger wind turbine rotors can be utilized without significantly increasing the cost of the supporting structure. Larger rotor diameters produce larger swept areas and consequently greater energy production from the wind thereby reducing the levelized cost of wind energy. To understand the development and structure of the near tower wake of a wind turbine, an experimental study was conducted to describe the flow field of the near wake for both upwind and downwind turbines. The study was conducted under controlled environment of a wind tunnel using a scaled model of a turbine. The NREL 5 MW reference wind turbine was used as a baseline design and was modified as necessary to design and build upwind and downwind scaled wind turbine models. This paper presents the results of the wind tunnel study using turbine models to quantify the near wake of upwind and downwind wind turbine configurations for various lengths of tower-to-turbine spacing. The variations of mean velocity and turbulence are measured using a computer-controlled, traversing hot wire probe. Additionally, smoke flow visualizations were conducted to qualitatively study the wake. The results show a more rapid dissipation of the near wake for an upwind configuration. The results can readily be incorporated into low fidelity system level turbine simulation tools to more accurately account for the wake on the aerodynamic loads of a upwind and downwind turbines.

Keywords: hot wire anemometry, near wake, upwind and downwind turbine. Hot wire anemometry, near wake, upwind and downwind turbine

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9 Regularized Euler Equations for Incompressible Two-Phase Flow Simulations

Authors: Teng Li, Kamran Mohseni

Abstract:

This paper presents an inviscid regularization technique for the incompressible two-phase flow simulations. This technique is known as observable method due to the understanding of observability that any feature smaller than the actual resolution (physical or numerical), i.e., the size of wire in hotwire anemometry or the grid size in numerical simulations, is not able to be captured or observed. Differ from most regularization techniques that applies on the numerical discretization, the observable method is employed at PDE level during the derivation of equations. Difficulties in the simulation and analysis of realistic fluid flow often result from discontinuities (or near-discontinuities) in the calculated fluid properties or state. Accurately capturing these discontinuities is especially crucial when simulating flows involving shocks, turbulence or sharp interfaces. Over the past several years, the properties of this new regularization technique have been investigated that show the capability of simultaneously regularizing shocks and turbulence. The observable method has been performed on the direct numerical simulations of shocks and turbulence where the discontinuities are successfully regularized and flow features are well captured. In the current paper, the observable method will be extended to two-phase interfacial flows. Multiphase flows share the similar features with shocks and turbulence that is the nonlinear irregularity caused by the nonlinear terms in the governing equations, namely, Euler equations. In the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows, the interfaces are usually treated as the smooth transition of the properties from one fluid phase to the other. However, in high Reynolds number or low viscosity flows, the nonlinear terms will generate smaller scales which will sharpen the interface, causing discontinuities. Many numerical methods for two-phase flows fail at high Reynolds number case while some others depend on the numerical diffusion from spatial discretization. The observable method regularizes this nonlinear mechanism by filtering the convective terms and this process is inviscid. The filtering effect is controlled by an observable scale which is usually about a grid length. Single rising bubble and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied, in particular, to examine the performance of the observable method. A pseudo-spectral method is used for spatial discretization which will not introduce numerical diffusion, and a Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) Runge Kutta method is applied for time integration. The observable incompressible Euler equations are solved for these two problems. In rising bubble problem, the terminal velocity and shape of the bubble are particularly examined and compared with experiments and other numerical results. In the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the shape of the interface are studied for different observable scale and the spike and bubble velocities, as well as positions (under a proper observable scale), are compared with other simulation results. The results indicate that this regularization technique can potentially regularize the sharp interface in the two-phase flow simulations

Keywords: Euler equations, incompressible flow simulation, inviscid regularization technique, two-phase flow

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8 Numerical Investigation of Flow Past in a Staggered Tube Bundle

Authors: Kerkouri Abdelkadir

Abstract:

Numerical calculations of turbulent flows are one of the most prominent modern interests in various engineering applications. Due to the difficulty of predicting, following up and studying this flow for computational fluid dynamic (CFD), in this paper, we simulated numerical study of a flow past in a staggered tube bundle, using CFD Code ANSYS FLUENT with several models of turbulence following: k-ε, k-ω and SST approaches. The flow is modeled based on the experimental studies. The predictions of mean velocities are in very good agreement with detailed LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) measurements performed in 8 stations along the depth of the array. The sizes of the recirculation zones behind the cylinders are also predicted. The simulations are conducted for Reynolds numbers of 12858. The Reynolds number is set to depend experimental results.

Keywords: flow, tube bundle, ANSYS Fluent, CFD, turbulence, LDA, RANS (k-ε, k-ω, SST)

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7 Unsteady Three-Dimensional Adaptive Spatial-Temporal Multi-Scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Solver to Simulate Rarefied Gas Flows in Micro/Nano Devices

Authors: Mirvat Shamseddine, Issam Lakkis

Abstract:

We present an efficient, three-dimensional parallel multi-scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) algorithm for the simulation of unsteady rarefied gas flows in micro/nanosystems. The algorithm employs a novel spatiotemporal adaptivity scheme. The scheme performs a fully dynamic multi-level grid adaption based on the gradients of flow macro-parameters and an automatic temporal adaptation. The computational domain consists of a hierarchical octree-based Cartesian grid representation of the flow domain and a triangular mesh for the solid object surfaces. The hybrid mesh, combined with the spatiotemporal adaptivity scheme, allows for increased flexibility and efficient data management, rendering the framework suitable for efficient particle-tracing and dynamic grid refinement and coarsening. The parallel algorithm is optimized to run DSMC simulations of strongly unsteady, non-equilibrium flows over multiple cores. The presented method is validated by comparing with benchmark studies and then employed to improve the design of micro-scale hotwire thermal sensors in rarefied gas flows.

Keywords: DSMC, oct-tree hierarchical grid, ray tracing, spatial-temporal adaptivity scheme, unsteady rarefied gas flows

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6 Wind Turbine Scaling for the Investigation of Vortex Shedding and Wake Interactions

Authors: Sarah Fitzpatrick, Hossein Zare-Behtash, Konstantinos Kontis

Abstract:

Traditionally, the focus of horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade aerodynamic optimisation studies has been the outer working region of the blade. However, recent works seek to better understand, and thus improve upon, the performance of the inboard blade region to enhance power production, maximise load reduction and better control the wake behaviour. This paper presents the design considerations and characterisation of a wind turbine wind tunnel model devised to further the understanding and fundamental definition of horizontal axis wind turbine root vortex shedding and interactions. Additionally, the application of passive and active flow control mechanisms – vortex generators and plasma actuators – to allow for the manipulation and mitigation of unsteady aerodynamic behaviour at the blade inboard section is investigated. A static, modular blade wind turbine model has been developed for use in the University of Glasgow’s de Havilland closed return, low-speed wind tunnel. The model components - which comprise of a half span blade, hub, nacelle and tower - are scaled using the equivalent full span radius, R, for appropriate Mach and Strouhal numbers, and to achieve a Reynolds number in the range of 1.7x105 to 5.1x105 for operational speeds up to 55m/s. The half blade is constructed to be modular and fully dielectric, allowing for the integration of flow control mechanisms with a focus on plasma actuators. Investigations of root vortex shedding and the subsequent wake characteristics using qualitative – smoke visualisation, tufts and china clay flow – and quantitative methods – including particle image velocimetry (PIV), hot wire anemometry (HWA), and laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) – were conducted over a range of blade pitch angles 0 to 15 degrees, and Reynolds numbers. This allowed for the identification of shed vortical structures from the maximum chord position, the transitional region where the blade aerofoil blends into a cylindrical joint, and the blade nacelle connection. Analysis of the trailing vorticity interactions between the wake core and freestream shows the vortex meander and diffusion is notably affected by the Reynold’s number. It is hypothesized that the shed vorticity from the blade root region directly influences and exacerbates the nacelle wake expansion in the downstream direction. As the design of inboard blade region form is, by necessity, driven by function rather than aerodynamic optimisation, a study is undertaken for the application of flow control mechanisms to manipulate the observed vortex phenomenon. The designed model allows for the effective investigation of shed vorticity and wake interactions with a focus on the accurate geometry of a root region which is representative of small to medium power commercial HAWTs. The studies undertaken allow for an enhanced understanding of the interplay of shed vortices and their subsequent effect in the near and far wake. This highlights areas of interest within the inboard blade area for the potential use of passive and active flow control devices which contrive to produce a more desirable wake quality in this region.

Keywords: vortex shedding, wake interactions, wind tunnel model, wind turbine

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5 Flow Separation Control on an Aerofoil Using Grooves

Authors: Neel K. Shah

Abstract:

Wind tunnel tests have been performed at The University of Manchester to investigate the impact of surface grooves of a trapezoidal planform on flow separation on a symmetrical aerofoil. A spanwise array of the grooves has been applied around the maximum thickness location of the upper surface of an NACA-0015 aerofoil. The aerofoil has been tested in a two-dimensional set-up in a low-speed wind tunnel at an angle of attack (AoA) of 3° and a chord-based Reynolds number (Re) of ~2.7 x 105. A laminar separation bubble developed on the aerofoil at low AoA. It has been found that the grooves shorten the streamwise extent of the separation bubble by shedding a pair of counter-rotating vortices. However, the increase in leading-edge suction due to the shorter bubble is not significant since the creation of the grooves results in a decrease of surface curvature and an increase in blockage (increase in surface pressure). Additionally, the increased flow mixing by the grooves thickens the boundary layer near the trailing edge of the aerofoil also contributes to this limitation. As a result of these competing effects, the improvement in the pressure-lift and pressure-drag coefficients are small, i.e., by ~1.30% and ~0.30%, respectively, at 3° AoA. Crosswire anemometry shows that the grooves increase turbulence intensity and Reynolds stresses in the wake, thus indicating an increase in viscous drag.

Keywords: aerofoil flow control, flow separation, grooves, vortices

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4 Measurement of Solids Concentration in Hydrocyclone Using ERT: Validation Against CFD

Authors: Vakamalla Teja Reddy, Narasimha Mangadoddy

Abstract:

Hydrocyclones are used to separate particles into different size fractions in the mineral processing, chemical and metallurgical industries. High speed video imaging, Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), X-ray and Gamma ray tomography are previously used to measure the two-phase flow characteristics in the cyclone. However, investigation of solids flow characteristics inside the cyclone is often impeded by the nature of the process due to slurry opaqueness and solid metal wall vessels. In this work, a dual-plane high speed Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is used to measure hydrocyclone internal flow dynamics in situ. Experiments are carried out in 3 inch hydrocyclone for feed solid concentrations varying in the range of 0-50%. ERT data analysis through the optimized FEM mesh size and reconstruction algorithms on air-core and solid concentration tomograms is assessed. Results are presented in terms of the air-core diameter and solids volume fraction contours using Maxwell’s equation for various hydrocyclone operational parameters. It is confirmed by ERT that the air core occupied area and wall solids conductivity levels decreases with increasing the feed solids concentration. Algebraic slip mixture based multi-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to predict the air-core size and the solid concentrations in the hydrocyclone. Validation of air-core size and mean solid volume fractions by ERT measurements with the CFD simulations is attempted.

Keywords: air-core, electrical resistance tomography, hydrocyclone, multi-phase CFD

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3 The Effect of Swirl on the Flow Distribution in Automotive Exhaust Catalysts

Authors: Piotr J. Skusiewicz, Johnathan Saul, Ijhar Rusli, Svetlana Aleksandrova, Stephen. F. Benjamin, Miroslaw Gall, Steve Pierson, Carol A. Roberts

Abstract:

The application of turbocharging in automotive engines leads to swirling flow entering the catalyst. The behaviour of this type of flow within the catalyst has yet to be adequately documented. This work discusses the effect of swirling flow on the flow distribution in automotive exhaust catalysts. Compressed air supplied to a moving-block swirl generator allowed for swirling flow with variable intensities to be generated. Swirl intensities were measured at the swirl generator outlet using single-sensor hot-wire probes. The swirling flow was fed into diffusers with total angles of 10°, 30° and 180°. Downstream of the diffusers, a wash-coated diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) of length 143.8 mm, diameter 76.2 mm and nominal cell density of 400 cpsi was fitted. Velocity profiles were measured at the outlet sleeve about 30 mm downstream of the monolith outlet using single-sensor hot-wire probes. Wall static pressure was recorded using a multi-tube manometer connected to pressure taps positioned along the diffuser walls. The results show that as swirl is increased, more of the flow is directed towards the diffuser walls. The velocity decreases around the centre-line and maximum velocities are observed close to the outer radius of the monolith for all flow rates. At the maximum swirl intensity, reversed flow was recorded near the centre of the monolith. Wall static pressure measurements in the 180° diffuser indicated no pressure recovery as the flow enters the diffuser. This is indicative of flow separation at the inlet to the diffuser. To gain insight into the flow structure, CFD simulations have been performed for the 180° diffuser for a flow rate of 63 g/s. The geometry of the model consists of the complete assembly from the upstream swirl generator to the outlet sleeve. Modelling of the flow in the monolith was achieved using the porous medium approach, where the monolith with parallel flow channels is modelled as a porous medium that resists the flow. A reasonably good agreement was achieved between the experimental and CFD results downstream of the monolith. The CFD simulations allowed visualisation of the separation zones and central toroidal recirculation zones that occur within the expansion region at certain swirl intensities which are highlighted.

Keywords: catalyst, computational fluid dynamics, diffuser, hot-wire anemometry, swirling flow

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2 Development and Experimental Validation of Coupled Flow-Aerosol Microphysics Model for Hot Wire Generator

Authors: K. Ghosh, S. N. Tripathi, Manish Joshi, Y. S. Mayya, Arshad Khan, B. K. Sapra

Abstract:

We have developed a CFD coupled aerosol microphysics model in the context of aerosol generation from a glowing wire. The governing equations can be solved implicitly for mass, momentum, energy transfer along with aerosol dynamics. The computationally efficient framework can simulate temporal behavior of total number concentration and number size distribution. This formulation uniquely couples standard K-Epsilon scheme with boundary layer model with detailed aerosol dynamics through residence time. This model uses measured temperatures (wire surface and axial/radial surroundings) and wire compositional data apart from other usual inputs for simulations. The model predictions show that bulk fluid motion and local heat distribution can significantly affect the aerosol behavior when the buoyancy effect in momentum transfer is considered. Buoyancy generated turbulence was found to be affecting parameters related to aerosol dynamics and transport as well. The model was validated by comparing simulated predictions with results obtained from six controlled experiments performed with a laboratory-made hot wire nanoparticle generator. Condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) were used for measurement of total number concentration and number size distribution at the outlet of reactor cell during these experiments. Our model-predicted results were found to be in reasonable agreement with observed values. The developed model is fast (fully implicit) and numerically stable. It can be used specifically for applications in the context of the behavior of aerosol particles generated from glowing wire technique and in general for other similar large scale domains. Incorporation of CFD in aerosol microphysics framework provides a realistic platform to study natural convection driven systems/ applications. Aerosol dynamics sub-modules (nucleation, coagulation, wall deposition) have been coupled with Navier Stokes equations modified to include buoyancy coupled K-Epsilon turbulence model. Coupled flow-aerosol dynamics equation was solved numerically and in the implicit scheme. Wire composition and temperature (wire surface and cell domain) were obtained/measured, to be used as input for the model simulations. Model simulations showed a significant effect of fluid properties on the dynamics of aerosol particles. The role of buoyancy was highlighted by observation and interpretation of nucleation zones in the planes above the wire axis. The model was validated against measured temporal evolution, total number concentration and size distribution at the outlet of hot wire generator cell. Experimentally averaged and simulated total number concentrations were found to match closely, barring values at initial times. Steady-state number size distribution matched very well for sub 10 nm particle diameters while reasonable differences were noticed for higher size ranges. Although tuned specifically for the present context (i.e., aerosol generation from hotwire generator), the model can also be used for diverse applications, e.g., emission of particles from hot zones (chimneys, exhaust), fires and atmospheric cloud dynamics.

Keywords: nanoparticles, k-epsilon model, buoyancy, CFD, hot wire generator, aerosol dynamics

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1 Backward-Facing Step Measurements at Different Reynolds Numbers Using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry

Authors: Maria Amelia V. C. Araujo, Billy J. Araujo, Brian Greenwood

Abstract:

The flow over a backward-facing step is characterized by the presence of flow separation, recirculation and reattachment, for a simple geometry. This type of fluid behaviour takes place in many practical engineering applications, hence the reason for being investigated. Historically, fluid flows over a backward-facing step have been examined in many experiments using a variety of measuring techniques such as laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), hot-wire anemometry, particle image velocimetry or hot-film sensors. However, some of these techniques cannot conveniently be used in separated flows or are too complicated and expensive. In this work, the applicability of the acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) technique is investigated to such type of flows, at various Reynolds numbers corresponding to different flow regimes. The use of this measuring technique in separated flows is very difficult to find in literature. Besides, most of the situations where the Reynolds number effect is evaluated in separated flows are in numerical modelling. The ADV technique has the advantage in providing nearly non-invasive measurements, which is important in resolving turbulence. The ADV Nortek Vectrino+ was used to characterize the flow, in a recirculating laboratory flume, at various Reynolds Numbers (Reh = 3738, 5452, 7908 and 17388) based on the step height (h), in order to capture different flow regimes, and the results compared to those obtained using other measuring techniques. To compare results with other researchers, the step height, expansion ratio and the positions upstream and downstream the step were reproduced. The post-processing of the AVD records was performed using a customized numerical code, which implements several filtering techniques. Subsequently, the Vectrino noise level was evaluated by computing the power spectral density for the stream-wise horizontal velocity component. The normalized mean stream-wise velocity profiles, skin-friction coefficients and reattachment lengths were obtained for each Reh. Turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds shear stresses and normal Reynolds stresses were determined for Reh = 7908. An uncertainty analysis was carried out, for the measured variables, using the moving block bootstrap technique. Low noise levels were obtained after implementing the post-processing techniques, showing their effectiveness. Besides, the errors obtained in the uncertainty analysis were relatively low, in general. For Reh = 7908, the normalized mean stream-wise velocity and turbulence profiles were compared directly with those acquired by other researchers using the LDV technique and a good agreement was found. The ADV technique proved to be able to characterize the flow properly over a backward-facing step, although additional caution should be taken for measurements very close to the bottom. The ADV measurements showed reliable results regarding: a) the stream-wise velocity profiles; b) the turbulent shear stress; c) the reattachment length; d) the identification of the transition from transitional to turbulent flows. Despite being a relatively inexpensive technique, acoustic Doppler velocimetry can be used with confidence in separated flows and thus very useful for numerical model validation. However, it is very important to perform adequate post-processing of the acquired data, to obtain low noise levels, thus decreasing the uncertainty.

Keywords: ADV, experimental data, multiple Reynolds number, post-processing

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