Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 7

Search results for: Sherry Ann Ganase

7 Climate Change Awareness at the Micro Level: Case Study of Grande Riviere, Trinidad

Authors: Sherry Ann Ganase, Sandra Sookram

Abstract:

This study investigates the level of awareness to climate change and major factors that influence such awareness in Grande Riviere, Trinidad. Through the development of an Awareness Index and application of a Structural Equation Model to survey data, the findings suggest an Awareness index value of 0.459 in Grande Riviere. These results suggest that households have climate smart attitudes and behaviors but climate knowledge is lacking. This is supported by the structural equation model which shows a negative relationship between awareness and causes of climate change. The study concludes by highlighting the need for immediate action on increasing knowledge.

Keywords: Climate Change, awareness, climate education, index structural equation model

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6 Life in Bequia in the Era of Climate Change: Societal Perception of Adaptation and Vulnerability

Authors: Sherry Ann Ganase, Sandra Sookram

Abstract:

This study examines adaptation measures and factors that influence adaptation decisions in Bequia by using multiple linear regression and a structural equation model. Using survey data, the results suggest that households are knowledgeable and concerned about climate change but lack knowledge about the measures needed to adapt. The findings from the SEM suggest that a positive relationship exist between vulnerability and adaptation, vulnerability and perception, along with a negative relationship between perception and adaptation. This suggests that being aware of the terms associated with climate change and knowledge about climate change is insufficient for implementing adaptation measures; instead the risk and importance placed on climate change, vulnerability experienced with household flooding, drainage and expected threat of future sea level are the main factors that influence the adaptation decision. The results obtained in this study are beneficial to all as adaptation requires a collective effort by stakeholders.

Keywords: Adaptation, structural equation model, Bequia, multiple linear regression

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5 Assessing the Vulnerability Level in Coastal Communities in the Caribbean: A Case Study of San Pedro, Belize

Authors: Sherry Ann Ganase, Sandra Sookram

Abstract:

In this paper, the vulnerability level to climate change is analysed using a comprehensive index, consisting of five pillars: human, social, natural, physical, and financial. A structural equation model is also applied to determine the indicators and relationships that exist between the observed environmental changes and the quality of life. Using survey data to model the results, a value of 0.382 is derived as the vulnerability level for San Pedro, where values closer to zero indicates lower vulnerability and values closer to one indicates higher vulnerability. The results showed the social pillar to be most vulnerable, with the indicator ‘participation’ ranked the highest in its cohort. Although, the environmental pillar is ranked as least vulnerable, the indicators ‘hazard’ and ‘biodiversity’ obtained scores closer to 0.4, suggesting that changes in the environment are occurring from natural and anthropogenic activities. These changes can negatively influence the quality of life as illustrated in the structural equation modelling. The study concludes by reporting on the need for collective action and participation by households in lowering vulnerability to ensure sustainable development and livelihood.

Keywords: Climate Change, Participation, structural equation model, vulnerability index, San Pedro

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4 Sustaining Language Learning: A Case Study of Multilingual Writers' ePortfolios

Authors: Amy Hodges, Deanna Rasmussen, Sherry Ward

Abstract:

This paper examines the use of ePortfolios in a two-course sequence for ESL (English as a Second Language) students at an international branch campus in Doha, Qatar. ePortfolios support the transfer of language learning, but few have examined the sustainability of that transfer across an ESL program. Drawing upon surveys and interviews with students, we analyze three case studies that complicate previous research on metacognition, language learning, and ePortfolios. Our findings have implications for those involved in ESL programs and assessment of student writing.

Keywords: Assessment, Technology, TESOL, electronic portfolios

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3 Teaching Entrepreneurship in Light of the Triple Bottom Line

Authors: Sherry Robinson, Hans Anton Stubberud

Abstract:

Entrepreneurship can take many forms. Traditional entrepreneurs seek profits and growth for the businesses they start themselves. Intrapreneurs act entrepreneurially within a business they do not own. Social entrepreneurs have goals other than (but not excluding) profit and growth as they seek to solve social problems or protect the environment. This type of entrepreneur often focuses on the triple bottom line, which includes a concern for people and the planet as well as profit. Ecopreneurs in particular are driven by their desire to create and promote environmentally sustainable products and processes. All of these entrepreneurs need an entrepreneurial orientation in order to survive and thrive. The three most common elements of an entrepreneurial orientation are (1) creativity and innovation, (2) the willingness to take risks and (3) the proactiveness to put ideas into action. This study describes an interdisciplinary entrepreneurship course integrating topics regarding the triple bottom line with those relevant to an entrepreneurial orientation. The results show that students significantly increased their skill levels in many areas, including soft skills such as communicating and working in teams, as well as designing innovative products and taking calculated risk.

Keywords: Sustainability, Creativity, Entrepreneurship Education, triple bottom line

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2 Improving Home and School Collaboration: Analysis of Parent and Teacher Involvement Practices in Public Elementary Schools in Benguet, Philippines

Authors: Sherry Junette Tagle

Abstract:

Extensive research continues to prove the positive effects of home and school collaborations in education. Although parent involvement programs in Benguet, Philippines are in place, the impact has yet to affect the current aggregate performance of elementary pupils. This study describes the involvement of public elementary teachers and parents along Epstein’s types of involvement using the sequential explanatory design. Survey and interview results show that teachers place greater value on activities that cater to communicating, volunteering, learning at home and decision making. On the other hand, parents are actively involved in all six types and value the importance of their involvement in school to their child’s schooling. Parents of grades 1-4 pupils significantly give importance to communicating activities to offset difficulties encountered by young pupils while parents of grades 5-6 pupils, have declining interest in volunteering and learning at home activities citing older children as being more independent to do teacher-assigned tasks. Teachers, compared to the other respondent groups, significantly place higher value on the importance of parent leaders as their partners in implementing school activities. In general, involvement of parents and teachers in home-school activities is intensive in the lower grade levels and decreases as their child progresses through school. A recommended program for future collaborations of the Philippine’s Department of Education has been formulated to diversify existing activities and elicit greater participation among the school’s stakeholders to achieve holistic development of the pupils and ultimately improve pupils’ school aggregate performance.

Keywords: Epstein's types of involvement, community collaborations, home and school partnerships, parent involvement

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1 Insulin-Producing Cells from Adult Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Control Chemically-Induced Diabetes in Dogs

Authors: Maha Azzam, Mahmoud Gabr, Mahmoud Zakaria, Ayman Refaie, Amani Ismail, Sherry Khater, Sylvia Ashamallah, Mohamed Ghoniem

Abstract:

Evidence was provided that human bone marrow-derived mesenhymal stem cells (HBM-MSCs) could be differentiated to form insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Transplantation of these cells was able to cure chemically-induced diabetes in nude mice. The efficacy of these cells to control diabetes in large animals was carried out to evaluate the sufficient number of cells needed/Kg body weight and to determine the functional longevity in vivo. Materials/Methods: Ten male mongrel dogs weighing 15-20 Kg were used in this study. Diabetes was chemically-induced in 7 dogs by a mixture of alloxan and streptozotocin. Three non-diabetic served as normal controls. Differentiated HBM-MSCs (5 million/Kg) were encapsulated in theracyte capsules and transplanted beneath the rectus sheath. Each dog received 2 capsules. One dog died 4 days postoperative from inhalation pneumonia. The remaining 6 dogs were followed up for 6-18 months. Results: Four dogs became normoglycemic within 6-8 weeks with normal glucose tolerance curves providing evidence that the transplanted cells were glucose-sensitive and insulin-responsive. In the remaining 2 dogs, fasting blood glucose was reduced but did not reach euglycemic levels. The sera of all transplanted dogs contained human insulin and c-peptide but negligible levels of canine insulin. When the HBM-MSCs loaded capsules were removed, rapid return of diabetic state was noted. The harvested capsules were examined by immunofluorescence. IPCs were seen and co-expression of with c-peptide was confirmed. Furthermore, all the pancreatic endocrine genes were expressed by the transplanted cells. Conclusions: This study provided evidence that theracyte capsules could protect the xenogenic HBM-MSCs from the host immune response. This is an important issue when clinical stem cell therapy is considered for definitive treatment for T1DM.

Keywords: Diabetes, mesenchymal stem cells, Dogs, Insulin-producing cells

Procedia PDF Downloads 45