Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 10

Search results for: Dhrubajit Barman

10 Software Cloning and Agile Environment

Authors: Ravi Kumar, Dhrubajit Barman, Nomi Baruah

Abstract:

Software Cloning has grown an active area in software engineering research community yielding numerous techniques, various tools and other methods for clone detection and removal. The copying, modifying a block of code is identified as cloning as it is the most basic means of software reuse. Agile Software Development is an approach which is currently being used in various software projects, so that it helps to respond the unpredictability of building software through incremental, iterative, work cadences. Software Cloning has been introduced to Agile Environment and many Agile Software Development approaches are using the concept of Software Cloning. This paper discusses the various Agile Software Development approaches. It also discusses the degree to which the Software Cloning concept is being introduced in the Agile Software Development approaches.

Keywords: agile environment, refactoring, reuse, software cloning

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9 Comparing SVM and Naïve Bayes Classifier for Automatic Microaneurysm Detections

Authors: A. Sopharak, B. Uyyanonvara, S. Barman

Abstract:

Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by the development of retinal microaneurysms. The damage can be prevented if disease is treated in its early stages. In this paper, we are comparing Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Naïve Bayes (NB) classifiers for automatic microaneurysm detection in images acquired through non-dilated pupils. The Nearest Neighbor classifier is used as a baseline for comparison. Detected microaneurysms are validated with expert ophthalmologists’ hand-drawn ground-truths. The sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy of each method are also compared.

Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, microaneurysm, naive Bayes classifier, SVM classifier

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8 Adsorption of Thionine Dye from its Aqueous Solution over Peanut Hull as a Low Cost Biosorbent

Authors: Alpana Saini, Sanghamitra Barman

Abstract:

Investigations were carried out to determine whether low cost peanut hull as adsorbent hold promise in removal of thionine dyes in the biomedical industries. Pollution of water due to presence of colorants is a severe socio-environmental problem caused by the discharge of industrial wastewater. In view of their toxicity, non-biodegradability and persistent nature, their removal becomes an absolute necessity. For the removal of Thionine Dye using Peanut Hull, the 10mg/L concentration of dyes, 0.5g/l of adsorbent and 200 rpm agitation speed are found to be optimum for the adsorption studies. The Spectrophotometric technique was adopted for the measurement of concentration of dyes before and after adsorption at ʎmax 598nm. The adsorption data has been fitted well to Langmuir isotherm than to Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The adsorbent was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

Keywords: adsorption, langmuir isotherm, peanut hull, thionine

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7 Bank Filtration System in Highly Mineralized Groundwater

Authors: Medalson Ronghang, Pranjal Barman, Heemantajeet Medhi

Abstract:

Bank filtration (BF) being a natural method of abstracting surface water from the river or lake via sub-surface. It can be intensively used and operated under various operating conditions for sustainability. Field investigations were carried out at various location of Kokrajhar (Assam) and Srinagar (Uttarakhand) to assess the ground water and their bank filtration wells to compare and characterized the quality. Results obtained from the analysis of the data suggest that major water quality parameter were much below the drinking water standard of BIS 10500 (2012). However, the iron concentration was found to be more than permissible limit in more than 50% of the sampled hand pump; the concentration ranged between 0.33-3.50 mg/L with acidic in nature (5.4 to 7.4) in Kokrajhar and high nitrate in Srinagar. But the abstracted water from the RBF wells has attenuated water quality with no iron concentration in Kokrajhar. The aquifers and riverbed material collected along the bank of Rivers Gaurang and Alaknanda were sieved and classified as coarse silt to medium gravel. The hydraulic conductivity was estimated in the range 5×10⁻³ to 1.4×10⁻²- 3.09×10⁻⁴-1.29 ×10⁻³ for Kokrajhar and Srinagar respectively suggesting a good permeability of the aquifer. The maximum safe yield of the well was estimated to be in the range of 4000 to 7500 L/min. This paper aims at demonstrating bank filtration method as an alternative to mineralized groundwater for drinking water.

Keywords: Riverbank filtration, mineralization, water quality, groundwater

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6 Local Residents' Perceptions of Economic Impacts of Urban Riverfront Development: Case of Sabarmati Riverfront Development

Authors: Smriti Mishra, Jaydip Barman, Shashi Kant Pandey

Abstract:

Many scholars suggest that waterfront development projects have an all round impact on cities. However, their research stops short of considering the perception of local residents, of what they think about the impact of such developments and the kind of waterfront development which they would prefer to support. Therefore, this paper attempts to address this imbalance in the literature by analysing a survey of residents' perceptions of such developments. The paper discusses the issue in the Indian context by considering Sabarmati Riverfront Development Project (SRFD) of Ahmadabad. It gives an overview of the project components of the SRFD; discusses its development issues and concerns associated with it. It further examines the structural relationship between socio-economic and demographic attributes of local residents and their attitudes and perception towards the economic impact of such developments. The study suggests that the economic component that riverfront development will attract more investment in their community and that riverfront development will increase real estate tax revenue emerged as strong components. While the economic component of substantial premiums to developers, land owners and local government and the other of cost of developing riverfront facilities are too much of a burden on government and public sector agencies appear to be weaker economic components of the perceived economic impacts of urban riverfront development. This paper also gives an overview of the urban waterfront development in the global scenario. It highlights the need to consider residents perception in the development of such projects.

Keywords: urban waterfront development, riverfront, economic impact, resident perception, SRFD

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5 Effect of Thermal Energy on Inorganic Coagulation for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater

Authors: Abhishek Singh, Rajlakshmi Barman, Tanmay Shah

Abstract:

Coagulation is considered to be one of the predominant water treatment processes which improve the cost effectiveness of wastewater. The sole purpose of this experiment on thermal coagulation is to increase the efficiency and the rate of reaction. The process uses renewable sources of energy which comprises of improved and minimized time method in order to eradicate the water scarcity of the regions which are on the brink of depletion. This paper includes the various effects of temperature on the standard coagulation treatment of wastewater and their effect on water quality. In addition, the coagulation is done with the mix of bottom/fly-ash that will act as an adsorbent and removes most of the minor and macro particles by means of adsorption which not only helps to reduce the environmental burden of fly ash but also enhance economic benefit. Also, the method of sand filtration is amalgamated in the process. The sand filter is an environmentally-friendly wastewater treatment method, which is relatively simple and inexpensive. The existing parameters were satisfied with the experimental results obtained in this study and were found satisfactory. The initial turbidity of the wastewater is 162 NTU. The initial temperature of the wastewater is 27 C. The temperature variation of the entire process is 50 C-80 C. The concentration of alum in wastewater is 60mg/L-320mg/L. The turbidity range is 8.31-28.1 NTU after treatment. pH variation is 7.73-8.29. The effective time taken is 10 minutes for thermal mixing and sedimentation. The results indicate that the presence of thermal energy affects the coagulation treatment process. The influence of thermal energy on turbidity is assessed along with renewable energy sources and increase of the rate of reaction of the treatment process.

Keywords: adsorbent, sand filter, temperature, thermal coagulation

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4 Analytic Hierarchy Process and Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Approach for Selecting the Most Effective Soil Erosion Zone in Gomati River Basin

Authors: Rajesh Chakraborty, Dibyendu Das, Rabindra Nath Barman, Uttam Kumar Mandal

Abstract:

In the present study, the objective is to find out the most effective zone causing soil erosion in the Gumati river basin located in the state of Tripura, a north eastern state of India using analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and multi-objective optimization on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA).The watershed is segmented into 20 zones based on Area. The watershed is considered by pointing the maximum elevation from sea lever from Google earth. The soil erosion is determined using the universal soil loss equation. The different independent variables of soil loss equation bear different weightage for different soil zones. And therefore, to find the weightage factor for all the variables of soil loss equation like rainfall runoff erosivity index, soil erodibility factor etc, analytical hierarchy process (AHP) is used. And thereafter, multi-objective optimization on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA) approach is used to select the most effective zone causing soil erosion. The MCDM technique concludes that the maximum soil erosion is occurring in the zone 14.

Keywords: soil erosion, analytic hierarchy process (AHP), multi criteria decision making (MCDM), universal soil loss equation (USLE), multi-objective optimization on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA)

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3 Planning and Design Criteria to Make Urban Transport More Sustainable: The Case of Baku

Authors: Gülnar Bayramoğlu Barman

Abstract:

Since the industrial revolution, technological developments and increased population have caused environmental damages. To protect the nature and architectural environment, firstly, green architecture, ecological architecture and then sustainability occurred. This term has been proposed not to be a new term but a response to environmental disturbances caused by human activities and it is re-conceptualization of architecture. Sustainable architecture or sustainability is lot more extensive than ecological and green architecture. It contains the imbalance between environmental problems that is natural environment and consumption that occurred all around the world. An important part of sustainability debate focused on urban planning and design for more sustainable forms and patterns. In particular, it is discussed that planning and design of urban areas have a major effect on transport and therefore can help reduce car usage, emissions, global warming and climate change. There are many planning and design approaches and movement that introduce certain criteria and strategies to prevent car dependency and encourage people to use public transportation and walking. However, when review the literature, it is seen that planning movements, such as New Urbanism and Transit Oriented Development originated and were implemented mostly in West European and North American Cities. The purpose of this study is to find out whether all those criteria, principles and strategies are also relevant planning approaches for more non-western cities like Baku, which has a very different planning background and therefore possibly different urban form and transport issues. In order to answer the above mentioned question, planning and design approaches in the literature and these recent planning movements were studied and a check list was formed which indicate planning and design approaches that can help attain a more sustainable transport outcome. The checklist was then applied to the case of Baku.

Keywords: sustainability, sustainable development, sustainable transportation, transport, urban design

Procedia PDF Downloads 351
2 Prediction of Positive Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Striking Zones for Charged Thundercloud Based on Line Charge Model

Authors: Surajit Das Barman, Rakibuzzaman Shah, Apurv Kumar

Abstract:

Bushfire is known as one of the ascendant factors to create pyrocumulus thundercloud that causes the ignition of new fires by pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) lightning strikes and creates major losses of lives and property worldwide. A conceptual model-based risk planning would be beneficial to predict the lightning striking zones on the surface of the earth underneath the pyroCb thundercloud. PyroCb thundercloud can generate both positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) and negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning in which +CG tends to ignite more bushfires and cause massive damage to nature and infrastructure. In this paper, a simple line charge structured thundercloud model is constructed in 2-D coordinates using the method of image charge to predict the probable +CG lightning striking zones on the earth’s surface for two conceptual thundercloud charge configurations: titled dipole and conventional tripole structure with excessive lower positive charge regions that lead to producing +CG lightning. The electric potential and surface charge density along the earth’s surface for both structures via continuously adjusting the position and the charge density of their charge regions is investigated. Simulation results for tilted dipole structure confirm the down-shear extension of the upper positive charge region in the direction of the cloud’s forward flank by 4 to 8 km, resulting in negative surface density, and would expect +CG lightning to strike within 7.8 km to 20 km around the earth periphery in the direction of the cloud’s forward flank. On the other hand, the conceptual tripole charge structure with enhanced lower positive charge region develops negative surface charge density on the earth’s surface in the range |x| < 6.5 km beneath the thundercloud and highly favors producing +CG lightning strikes.

Keywords: pyrocumulonimbus, cloud-to-ground lightning, charge structure, surface charge density, forward flank

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1 Serum Zinc Level in Patients with Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

Authors: Nilima Barman, M. Atiqul Haque, Debabrata Ghosh

Abstract:

Background: Zinc, one of the vital micronutrients, has an incredible role in the immune system. Hypozincemia affects host defense by reducing the number of circulating T cells and phagocytosis activity of other cells which ultimately impair cell-mediated immunity 1, 2. The immune system is detrimentally suppressed in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) 3, 4, a major threat of TB control worldwide5. As zinc deficiency causes immune suppression, we assume that it might have a role in the development of MDR-TB. Objectives: To estimate the serum zinc level in newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in comparison with that of newly diagnosed pulmonary TB (NdPTB) and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in the department of Public Health and Informatics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka in collaboration with National Institute of Diseases of the Chest Hospital (NIDCH), Bangladesh from March’ 2012 to February 2013. A total of 337 respondents, of them 107 were MDR TB patients enrolled from NIDCH, 69 were NdPTB and 161 were healthy adults. All NdPTB patients and healthy adults were randomly selected from Sirajdikhan subdistrict of Munshiganj District. It is a rural community 22 kilometer south from capital city Dhaka. Serum zinc level was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method from early morning fasting blood sample. The evaluation of serum zinc level was done according to normal range from 70 to120 µgm/dL6. Results: Males were predominant in study groups (p>0.05). Mean (sd) serum zinc levels in MDR-TB, NdPTB and healthy adult group were 65.14 (12.52), 75.22(15.89), and 87.98 (21.80) μgm/dL respectively and differences were statistically significant (F=52.08, P value<0.001). After multiple comparison test (Bonferroni test) significantly lower level of serum zinc was found in MDRTB group than NdPTB and healthy adults (p<.001). Point biserial correlation showed a negative association of having MDR TB and serum zinc level (r= -.578; p value <0.001). Conclusion: The significant low level of serum zinc in MDR-TB patients suggested impaired immune status. We recommended for further exploration of low level of serum zinc as risk factor of MDR TB.

Keywords: Bangladesh, immune status, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, serum zinc

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