Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

polymethylmethacrylate Related Abstracts

2 Energy Deposited by Secondary Electrons Generated by Swift Proton Beams through Polymethylmethacrylate

Authors: Maurizio Dapor, Isabel Abril, Pablo de Vera, Rafael Garcia-Molina

Abstract:

The ionization yield of ion tracks in polymers and bio-molecular systems reaches a maximum, known as the Bragg peak, close to the end of the ion trajectories. Along the path of the ions through the materials, many electrons are generated, which produce a cascade of further ionizations and, consequently, a shower of secondary electrons. Among these, very low energy secondary electrons can produce damage in the biomolecules by dissociative electron attachment. This work deals with the calculation of the energy distribution of electrons produced by protons in a sample of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), a material that is used as a phantom for living tissues in hadron therapy. PMMA is also of relevance for microelectronics in CMOS technologies and as a photoresist mask in electron beam lithography. We present a Monte Carlo code that, starting from a realistic description of the energy distribution of the electrons ejected by protons moving through PMMA, simulates the entire cascade of generated secondary electrons. By following in detail the motion of all these electrons, we find the radial distribution of the energy that they deposit in PMMA for several initial proton energies characteristic of the Bragg peak.

Keywords: monte carlo method, secondary electrons, energetic ions, ion-beam cancer therapy, ionization cross section, polymethylmethacrylate, proton beams, radial energy distribution

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1 A Review on Development of Pedicle Screws and Characterization of Biomaterials for Fixation in Lumbar Spine

Authors: Shri Dubey, Jamal Ghorieshi

Abstract:

Instability of the lumbar spine is caused by various factors that include degenerative disc, herniated disc, traumatic injuries, and other disorders. Pedicle screws are widely used as a main fixation device to construct rigid linkages of vertebrae to provide a fully functional and stable spine. Various technologies and methods have been used to restore the stabilization. However, loosening of pedicle screws is the main cause of concerns for neurosurgeons. This could happen due to poor bone quality with osteoporosis as well as types of pedicle screw used. Compatibilities and stabilities of pedicle screws with bone depend on design (thread design, length, and diameter) and material. Grip length and pullout strength affect the motion and stability of the spine when it goes through different phases such as extension, flexion, and rotation. Pullout strength of augmented pedicle screws is increased in both primary and salvage procedures by 119% (p = 0.001) and 162% (p = 0.01), respectively. Self-centering pedicle screws at different trajectories (0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°) show the same pullout strength as insertion in a straight-ahead trajectory. The outer cylindrical and inner conical shape of pedicle screws show the highest pullout strength in Grades 5 and 15 foams (synthetic bone). An outer cylindrical and inner conical shape with a V-shape thread exhibit the highest pullout strength in all foam grades. The maximum observed pullout strength is at axial pullout configuration at 0°. For Grade 15 (240 kg/m³) foam, there is a decline in pull out strength. The largest decrease in pullout strength is reported for Grade 10 (160 kg/m³) foam. The maximum pullout strength of 2176 N (0.32-g/cm³ Sawbones) on all densities. Type 1 Pedicle screw shows the best fixation due to smaller conical core diameter and smaller thread pitch (Screw 2 with 2 mm; Screws 1 and 3 with 3 mm).

Keywords: cps, PMMA, PEEK, polymethylmethacrylate, classical pedicle screws, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, EPEEKS, includes translaminar facet screw, TLFS, poly-ether-ether-ketone, transfacetopedicular screw, TFPS

Procedia PDF Downloads 12