Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

polycarbonate Related Abstracts

4 Thermal Ageing Effect on Mechanical Behavior of Polycarbonate

Authors: H. Babou, S. Ridjla, B. Amerate, R. Ferhoum, M. Aberkane

Abstract:

This work is devoted to the experimental study of thermal ageing effect on the mechanical and micro structural behavior of polycarbonate (PC). A simple compression tests, micro hardness and an IRTF analysis were completed in order to characterize the response of material on specimens after ageing at a temperature of order 100 C° and for serval maintain duration 72, 144 and 216 hours. These investigations showed a decrease of the intrinsic properties of polycarbonate (Young modulus, yield stress, etc.); the superposition of spectra IRTF shows that the intensity of chemical connections C=C, C-O, CH3 and C-H are influenced by the duration of thermal ageing; in addition, an increase of 30 % of micro hardness was detected after 216 hour of ageing.

Keywords: Mechanical Behavior, compression test, amorphous polymer, polycarbonate, thermal ageing

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3 Reduction of Residual Stress by Variothermal Processing and Validation via Birefringence Measurement Technique on Injection Molded Polycarbonate Samples

Authors: Kay André Weidenmann, Peter Elsner, Christoph Lohr, Hanna Wund

Abstract:

Injection molding is one of the most commonly used techniques in the industrial polymer processing. In the conventional process of injection molding, the liquid polymer is injected into the cavity of the mold, where the polymer directly starts hardening at the cooled walls. To compensate the shrinkage, which is caused predominantly by the immediate cooling, holding pressure is applied. Through that whole process, residual stresses are produced by the temperature difference of the polymer melt and the injection mold and the relocation of the polymer chains, which were oriented by the high process pressures and injection speeds. These residual stresses often weaken or change the structural behavior of the parts or lead to deformation of components. One solution to reduce the residual stresses is the use of variothermal processing. Hereby the mold is heated – i.e. near/over the glass transition temperature of the polymer – the polymer is injected and before opening the mold and ejecting the part the mold is cooled. For the next cycle, the mold gets heated again and the procedure repeats. The rapid heating and cooling of the mold are realized indirectly by convection of heated and cooled liquid (here: water) which is pumped through fluid channels underneath the mold surface. In this paper, the influences of variothermal processing on the residual stresses are analyzed with samples in a larger scale (500 mm x 250 mm x 4 mm). In addition, the influence on functional elements, such as abrupt changes in wall thickness, bosses, and ribs, on the residual stress is examined. Therefore the polycarbonate samples are produced by variothermal and isothermal processing. The melt is injected into a heated mold, which has in our case a temperature varying between 70 °C and 160 °C. After the filling of the cavity, the closed mold is cooled down varying from 70 °C to 100 °C. The pressure and temperature inside the mold are monitored and evaluated with cavity sensors. The residual stresses of the produced samples are illustrated by birefringence where the effect on the refractive index on the polymer under stress is used. The colorful spectrum can be uncovered by placing the sample between a polarized light source and a second polarization filter. To show the achievement and processing effects on the reduction of residual stress the birefringence images of the isothermal and variothermal produced samples are compared and evaluated. In this comparison to the variothermal produced samples have a lower amount of maxima of each color spectrum than the isothermal produced samples, which concludes that the residual stress of the variothermal produced samples is lower.

Keywords: Residual Stress, injection molding, birefringence, polycarbonate, variothermal processing

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2 Influence of UV Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Polycarbonate

Authors: R. Ferhoum, M. Gratton, N. Poirot, N. Ait Hocine, S. Redjala, S. Azem

Abstract:

Polycarbonate (PC) is a promising polymer with high transparency in the range of the visible spectrum and is used in various fields, for example medical, electronic, automotive. Its low weight, chemical inertia, high impact resistance and relatively low cost are of major importance. In recent decades, some materials such as metals and ceramics have been replaced by polymers because of their superior advantages. However, some characteristics of the polymers are highly modified under the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. The changes induced in the material by such aging depend on the exposure time, the wavelength of the UV radiation and the temperature level. The UV energy is sufficient to break the chemical bonds leading to a cleavage of the molecular chains. This causes changes in the mechanical, thermal, optical and morphological properties of the material. The present work is focused on the study of the effects of aging under ultraviolet (UV) radiation and under different temperature values on the physical-chemical and mechanical properties of a PC. Thus, various investigations, such as FTIR and XRD analyses, SEM and optical microscopy observations, micro-hardness measurements and monotonic and cyclic tensile tests, were carried out on the PC in the initial state and after aging. Results have shown the impact of aging on the properties of the PC studied. In fact, the MEB highlighted changes in the superficial morphology of the material by the presence of cracks and material de-bonding in the form of debris. The FTIR spectra reveal an attenuation of the peaks like the hydroxyl (OH) groups located at 3520 cm-1. The XRD lines shift towards a larger angle, reaching a maximum of 3°. In addition, Vickers micro-hardness measurements show that aging affects the surface and the core of the material, which results in different mechanical behaviours under monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. This study pointed out effects of aging on the macroscopic properties of the PC studied, in relationship with its microstructural changes.

Keywords: Mechanical Properties, polycarbonate, physical-chemical properties, UV aging, temperature aging

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1 Isosorbide Bis-Methyl Carbonate: Opportunities for an Industrial Model Based on Biomass

Authors: Olga Gomez De Miranda, Jose R. Ochoa-Gomez, Stefaan De Wildeman, Luciano Monsegue, Soraya Prieto, Leire Lorenzo, Cristina Dineiro

Abstract:

The chemical industry is facing a new revolution. As long as processes based on the exploitation of fossil resources emerged with force in the XIX century, Society currently demands a new radical change that will lead to the complete and irreversible implementation of a circular sustainable economic model. The implementation of biorefineries will be essential for this. There, renewable raw materials as sugars and other biomass resources are exploited for the development of new materials that will partially replace their petroleum-derived homologs in a safer, and environmentally more benign approach. Isosorbide, (1,4:3,6-dianhydro-d-glucidol) is a primary bio-based derivative obtained from the plant (poly) saccharides and a very interesting example of a useful chemical produced in biorefineries. It can, in turn, be converted to other secondary monomers as isosorbide bis-methyl carbonate (IBMC), whose main field of application can be as a key biodegradable intermediary substitute of bisphenol-A in the manufacture of polycarbonates, or as an alternative to the toxic isocyanates in the synthesis of new polyurethanes (non-isocyanate polyurethanes) both with a huge application market. New products will present advantageous mechanical or optical properties, as well as improved behavior in non-toxicity and biodegradability aspects in comparison to their petro-derived alternatives. A robust production process of IBMC, a biomass-derived chemical, is here presented. It can be used with different raw material qualities using dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as both co-reactant and solvent. It consists of the transesterification of isosorbide with DMC under soft operational conditions, using different basic catalysts, always active with the isosorbide characteristics and purity. Appropriate isolation processes have been also developed to obtain crude IBMC yields higher than 90%, with oligomers production lower than 10%, independently of the quality of the isosorbide considered. All of them are suitable to be used in polycondensation reactions for polymers obtaining. If higher qualities of IBMC are needed, a purification treatment based on nanofiltration membranes has been also developed. The IBMC reaction-isolation conditions established in the laboratory have been successfully modeled using appropriate software programs and moved to a pilot-scale (production of 100 kg of IBMC). It has been demonstrated that a highly efficient IBMC production process able to be up-scaled under suitable market conditions has been obtained. Operational conditions involved the production of IBMC involve soft temperature and energy needs, no additional solvents, and high operational efficiency. All of them are according to green manufacturing rules.

Keywords: biomass, Catalyst, transesterification, polyurethane, polycarbonate, isosorbide bis-methyl carbonate

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