Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

participatory research Related Abstracts

3 Assessment of the Use of Participatory Research Methods among Researchers in Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria

Authors: Samson Olusegun Apantaku, Adetayo K. Aromolaran, Giyatt Hammed

Abstract:

The study assessed the use of participatory research methods among Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria (FUNAAB) researchers. Simple random sampling technique was used to select one hundred and twenty respondents from the study area. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Data collected were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. Results showed that 75.8% of the respondents were males while only 21.3% were female. The mean age of the respondents was 38.8 years and most (77.5%) of them were married. 15% of the respondents were in professorial cadre, 21.7% and 20% of the respondents were senior lecturers/fellow and lecturer/research fellow I&II respectively. The results further revealed that 93.3% of the respondents were aware of participatory research methods and 82.5% of the respondents have utilized it before. The average period of usage was 2.7 years and participation by consultation (86.7%) and interactive participation (76.7%) were mostly used. Most (94.2%) indicated that fund was the major hindrance to the use of participatory research methods. The result of correlation analysis showed that there was significant relationship between the years of research experience, designation post (status) of the respondents and usage of participatory research methods (r = 0.034, 0.031, p < 0.05). The study concluded that most of the researchers were aware of and used participatory research methods, which could influence the quality of their research or make it acceptable to the end users. It was recommended that more funds should be made available and accessible for participatory research. All researchers should be trained and encouraged to make use of participatory research methods in their research activities so as to achieve effective research and capacity building that could enhance adoption of technologies and increase agricultural production in the country. Farmers’ capacity to participate in agricultural research should also be enhanced.

Keywords: Utilization, awareness, participatory research, participatory research methods

Procedia PDF Downloads 258
2 Social Technology and Youth Justice: An Exploration of Ethical and Practical Challenges

Authors: Ravinder Barn, Balbir Barn

Abstract:

This paper outlines ethical and practical challenges in the building of social technology for use with socially excluded and marginalised groups. The primary aim of this study was to design, deploy and evaluate social technology that may help to promote better engagement between case workers and young people to help prevent recidivism, and support young people’s transition towards social inclusion in society. A total of 107 practitioners/managers (n=64), and young people (n=43) contributed to the data collection via surveys, focus groups and 1-1 interviews. Through a process of co-design where end-users are involved as key contributors to social technological design, this paper seeks to make an important contribution to the area of participatory methodologies by arguing that whilst giving ‘voice’ to key stakeholders in the research process is crucial, there is a risk that competing voices may lead to tensions and unintended outcomes. The paper is contextualized within a Foucauldian perspective to examine significant concepts including power, authority and surveillance. Implications for youth justice policy and practice are considered. The authors conclude that marginalized youth and over-stretched practitioners are better served when such social technology is perceived and adopted as a tool of empowerment within a framework of child welfare and child rights.

Keywords: Power, Marginalization, participatory research, youth justice, social technology

Procedia PDF Downloads 322
1 My Voice My Well-Being: A Participatory Research Study with Secondary School Students in Bangladesh

Authors: Saira Hossain

Abstract:

Well-being commonly refers to the concept that equates to a good life. Similarly, student well-being can be understood as a notion of a good life at school. What constitutes a good life at school for students? – is an emerging question that poses huge interest in this area of research. Student well-being is not only associated with a student’s socio-emotional and academic development at school but also success in life after school as an adult. Today, student well-being is a popular agenda for educators, policymakers, teachers, parents, and most importantly, for students. With the emergence of student well-being, student's voice in matters important to them at school is increasingly getting priority. However, the coin has another side too. Despite the growing importance of understanding student well-being, it is still an alien concept in countries like Bangladesh. The education system of Bangladesh is highly rigid, centralized, and exam-focused. Student's academic achievement has been given the utmost priority at school, whereas their voice, as well as their well-being, is grossly neglected in practice. In this regard, the study set out to explore students' conceptualization of well-being at school in Bangladesh. The study was qualitative. It employed a participatory research approach to elicit the views of 25 secondary school students of aged 14-16 in Bangladesh to explore the concept of well-being. Data analysis was conducted following the thematic analysis technique. The results suggested that student conceptualized well-being as a multidimensional concept with multiple domains, including having, being, relating, feeling, thinking, functioning, and striving. The future implication of the study findings is discussed. Additionally, the study also underscores the implication of the participatory approach as a research technique to explore students' opinion in Bangladesh, where there exists a culture of silence regarding the student's voice.

Keywords: Bangladesh, secondary school, participatory research, student well-being

Procedia PDF Downloads 1