Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

organisational citizenship behaviour Related Abstracts

3 The Evaluation of the Restructuring Process in Nursing Services by Nurses

Authors: Bilgen Özlük, Ülkü Baykal

Abstract:

The study was conducted with the aim of determining the evaluations of nurses directed at the restructuring process carried out in the nursing services of a private hospital, and reveal how they have been affected by this process, in an integrated manner between a prospective approach and methods of quantitative and qualitative research, and as a comparative study, comparing the changes over a period of three years. The sample for the study is comprised of all of the nurses employed at a private hospital, and data has been collected from 17 nurses (a total of 30 interviews) for the qualitative part 377 nurses in 2013 and 429 nurses in 2014 for the quantitative part. As vehicles of data collection, the study used a form directed at identifying the changes in the organisational and management structure of the hospital, a nurses' interview form, a questionnaire identifying the personal and occupational characteristics of the nurses, the "Minnesota Job Satisfaction Scale", the "Organisational Citizenship Behaviour Scale" and the "Organisational Trust Scale". Qualitative data by researchers, quantitative data was analysed using number and percentage tests, a t-test, and ANOVA, progressive analysis Tukey and regression tests. While in the qualitative part of the study the nurses stated in the first year of the restructuring that they were satisfied with their relationship with top level management, the increases in salaries and changes in the working environment such as the increase in the number of staff, in later years, they stated that there had been a fall in their satisfaction levels due to reasons such as nursing services instead of nurse practitioners in a position they are not satisfied that the director, nursing services outside the nursing profession appointment of persons to positions of management and the lack of appropriate training and competence of these persons, increases in the burden of work, insufficient salaries and the lack of a difference in the salaries of senior and more junior staff. On the other hand, in the quantitative part, it was found that there was no difference in the levels of job satisfaction and organisational trust in any of the two years, that as the level of organisational trust increased the level of job satisfaction also increased, and that as the levels of job satisfaction and organisational trust a positive impact on organisational citizenship behaviour also increased.

Keywords: Services, nursing management, Job Satisfaction, re-structuring, organisational citizenship behaviour, organisational trust

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2 Effects of Main Contractors’ Service Quality on Subcontractors’ Behaviours and Project Outcomes

Authors: Zhuoyuan Wang, Benson T. H. Lim, Imriyas Kamardeen

Abstract:

Effective service quality management has long been touted as a means of improving project and organisational performance. Particularly, in construction projects, main contractors are often seen as a broker between clients and subcontractors, and their service quality is thus associated with the overall project affinity and outcomes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on the aspect of clients-main contractors, very little research has been done to explore the effect of contractors’ service quality on subcontractors’ behaviours and so project outcomes. In addressing this gap, this study surveyed 97 subcontractors in the Chinese Construction industry and data was analysed using the Partial Least Square (PLS) Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique. The overall findings reveal that subcontractors categorised main contractors’ service quality into three dimensions: assurance; responsiveness; reliability and empathy. Of these, it is found that main contractors’ ‘assurance’ and ‘responsiveness’ positively influence subcontractors’ intention to engage in contractual behaviours. The results further show that the subcontractors’ intention to engage in organizational citizenship behaviours is associated with how flexible and committed the main contractors are in reliability and empathy. Collectively, both subcontractors’ contractual and organizational citizenship behaviours positively influence the overall project outcomes. In conclusion, the findings inform contractors different strategies towards managing and gaining subcontractors’ behaviour commitment in a socially connected, yet complex and uncertain, business environment.

Keywords: Service Quality, social exchange theory, organisational citizenship behaviour, construction firms

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1 Ibadan-Nigeria Citizenship Behavior Scale: Development and Validation

Authors: Benjamin O. Ehigie, Aderemi Alarape, Nyitor Shenge, Sylvester A. Okhakhume, Timileyin Fashola, Fiyinfunjah Dosumu

Abstract:

Organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) is a construct in industrial and organisational behaviour that explains a person's voluntary commitment within an organisation, which is outside the scope of his or her contractual tasks. To attain organisational effectiveness the human factor of production is inevitable, hence the importance of employee behaviour. While the concept of organisational citizenship behavior is mostly discussed in the context of the workplace, it is reasoned that the idea could be reflective in relation to national commitment. Many developing countries in Africa, including Nigeria, suffer economic hardship today not necessarily due to poor resources but bad management of the resources. The mangers of their economies are not committed to the tenets of economic growth but engrossed in fraud, corruption, bribery, and other economic vices. It is this backdrop that necessitated the development and validation of the Ibadan-Nigeria Citizenship Behaviour (I-NCB) Scale. The study adopted a cross-sectional survey (online) research design, using 2404 postgraduate students in the Premier University of the country, with 99.2% being Nigerians and 0.8% non-Nigerians. Gender composition was 1,439 (60%) males and 965 (40%) females, 1201 (50%) were employed while 1203 50% unemployed, 74.2% of the employed were in public paid employment, 19.5% in private sector, and 6.3% were self-employed. Through literature review, 78 items were generated. Using 10 lecturers and 21 students, content and face validity were established respectively. Data collected were subjected to reliability and factor analytic statistics at p < .05 level of significance. Results of the content and face validity at 80% level of item acceptance resulted to 60 items; this was further reduced to 50 after item-total correlation using r=.30 criterion. Divergent validity of r= -.28 and convergent validity of r= .44 were obtained by correlating the I-NCB scale with standardized Counterproductive work behaviour (CWB) scale and Organisational Citizenship Behaviour (OCB) scale among the workers. The reliability coefficients obtained were; Cronbach alpha of internal consistency (α = 0.941) and split-half reliability of r = 0.728. Factor analyses of the I-NCB scale with principal component and varimax rotation yielded five factors when Eigenvalue above 1 were extracted. The factors which accounted for larger proportions of the total variance were given factor names as; Altruistic, Attachment, Affective, Civic responsibility and Allegiance. As much as there are vast journals on citizenship behaviour in organisations, there exists no standardized tool to measure citizenship behaviour of a country. The Ibadan-Nigeria Citizenship Behaviour (I-NCB) scale was consequently developed. The scale could be used to select personnel into political positions and senior administrative positions among career workers in Nigeria, with the aim of determining national commitment to service.

Keywords: CWB, ibadan, OCB, organisational citizenship behaviour, counterproductive work behaviour, Nigeria Citizenship Behaviour

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