Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

molecular imprinting Related Abstracts

3 Fabrication of Highly Stable Low-Density Self-Assembled Monolayers by Thiolyne Click Reaction

Authors: Leila Safazadeh, Brad Berron

Abstract:

Self-assembled monolayers have tremendous impact in interfacial science, due to the unique opportunity they offer to tailor surface properties. Low-density self-assembled monolayers are an emerging class of monolayers where the environment-interfacing portion of the adsorbate has a greater level of conformational freedom when compared to traditional monolayer chemistries. This greater range of motion and increased spacing between surface-bound molecules offers new opportunities in tailoring adsorption phenomena in sensing systems. In particular, we expect low-density surfaces to offer a unique opportunity to intercalate surface bound ligands into the secondary structure of protiens and other macromolecules. Additionally, as many conventional sensing surfaces are built upon gold surfaces (SPR or QCM), these surfaces must be compatible with gold substrates. Here, we present the first stable method of generating low-density self assembled monolayer surfaces on gold for the analysis of their interactions with protein targets. Our approach is based on the 2:1 addition of thiol-yne chemistry to develop new classes of y-shaped adsorbates on gold, where the environment-interfacing group is spaced laterally from neighboring chemical groups. This technique involves an initial deposition of a crystalline monolayer of 1,10 decanedithiol on the gold substrate, followed by grafting of a low-packed monolayer on through a photoinitiated thiol-yne reaction in presence of light. Orthogonality of the thiol-yne chemistry (commonly referred to as a click chemistry) allows for preparation of low-density monolayers with variety of functional groups. To date, carboxyl, amine, alcohol, and alkyl terminated monolayers have been prepared using this core technology. Results from surface characterization techniques such as FTIR, contact angle goniometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirm the proposed low chain-chain interactions of the environment interfacing groups. Reductive desorption measurements suggest a higher stability for the click-LDMs compared to traditional SAMs, along with the equivalent packing density at the substrate interface, which confirms the proposed stability of the monolayer-gold interface. In addition, contact angle measurements change in the presence of an applied potential, supporting our description of a surface structure which allows the alkyl chains to freely orient themselves in response to different environments. We are studying the differences in protein adsorption phenomena between well packed and our loosely packed surfaces, and we expect this data will be ready to present at the GRC meeting. This work aims to contribute biotechnology science in the following manner: Molecularly imprinted polymers are a promising recognition mode with several advantages over natural antibodies in the recognition of small molecules. However, because of their bulk polymer structure, they are poorly suited for the rapid diffusion desired for recognition of proteins and other macromolecules. Molecularly imprinted monolayers are an emerging class of materials where the surface is imprinted, and there is not a bulk material to impede mass transfer. Further, the short distance between the binding site and the signal transduction material improves many modes of detection. My dissertation project is to develop a new chemistry for protein-imprinted self-assembled monolayers on gold, for incorporation into SPR sensors. Our unique contribution is the spatial imprinting of not only physical cues (seen in current imprinted monolayer techniques), but to also incorporate complementary chemical cues. This is accomplished through a photo-click grafting of preassembled ligands around a protein template. This conference is important for my development as a graduate student to broaden my appreciation of the sensor development beyond surface chemistry.

Keywords: low-density self-assembled monolayers, thiol-yne click reaction, molecular imprinting

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2 Determination of Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies on Quartz Crystal Microbalance Based Nanosensors

Authors: Y. Saylan, F. Yılmaz, A. Denizli

Abstract:

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which is the most common autoimmune disorder of the body's own immune system attacking healthy cells. RA has both articular and systemic effects.Until now romatiod factor (RF) assay is used the most commonly diagnosed RA but it is not specific. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies are IgG autoantibodies which recognize citrullinated peptides and offer improved specificity in early diagnosis of RA compared to RF. Anti-CCP antibodies have specificity for the diagnosis of RA from 91 to 98% and the sensitivity rate of 41-68%. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are materials that are easy to prepare, less expensive, stable have a talent for molecular recognition and also can be manufactured in large quantities with good reproducibility. Molecular recognition-based adsorption techniques have received much attention in several fields because of their high selectivity for target molecules. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is an effective, simple, inexpensive approach mass changes that can be converted into an electrical signal. The applications for specific determination of chemical substances or biomolecules, crystal electrodes, cover by the thin films for bind or adsorption of molecules. In this study, we have focused our attention on combining of molecular imprinting into nanofilms and QCM nanosensor approaches and producing QCM nanosensor for anti-CCP, chosen as a model protein, using anti-CCP imprinted nanofilms. For this aim, anti-CCP imprinted QCM nanosensor was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements and ellipsometry. The non-imprinted nanosensor was also prepared to evaluate the selectivity of the imprinted nanosensor. Anti-CCP imprinted QCM nanosensor was tested for real-time detection of anti-CCP from aqueous solution. The kinetic and affinity studies were determined by using anti-CCP solutions with different concentrations. The responses related with mass shifts (Δm) and frequency shifts (Δf) were used to evaluate adsorption properties and to calculate binding (Ka) and dissociation (Kd) constants. To show the selectivity of the anti-CCP imprinted QCM nanosensor, competitive adsorption of anti-CCP and IgM was investigated.The results indicate that anti-CCP imprinted QCM nanosensor has a higher adsorption capabilities for anti-CCP than for IgM, due to selective cavities in the polymer structure.

Keywords: Rheumatoid Arthritis, molecular imprinting, nanosensor, anti-CCP, QCM

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1 Molecularly Imprinted Nanoparticles (MIP NPs) as Non-Animal Antibodies Substitutes for Detection of Viruses

Authors: Alessandro Poma, Kal Karim, Sergey Piletsky, Giuseppe Battaglia

Abstract:

The recent increasing emergency threat to public health of infectious influenza diseases has prompted interest in the detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N1 in humans as well as animals. A variety of technologies for diagnosing AIV infection have been developed. However, various disadvantages (costs, lengthy analyses, and need for high-containment facilities) make these methods less than ideal in their practical application. Molecularly Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles (MIP NPs) are suitable to overcome these limitations by having high affinity, selectivity, versatility, scalability and cost-effectiveness with the versatility of post-modification (labeling – fluorescent, magnetic, optical) opening the way to the potential introduction of improved diagnostic tests capable of providing rapid differential diagnosis. Here we present our first results in the production and testing of MIP NPs for the detection of AIV H5N1. Recent developments in the solid-phase synthesis of MIP NPs mean that for the first time a reliable supply of ‘soluble’ synthetic antibodies can be made available for testing as potential biological or diagnostic active molecules. The MIP NPs have the potential to detect viruses that are widely circulating in farm animals and indeed humans. Early and accurate identification of the infectious agent will expedite appropriate control measures. Thus, diagnosis at an early stage of infection of a herd or flock or individual maximizes the efficiency with which containment, prevention and possibly treatment strategies can be implemented. More importantly, substantiating the practicability’s of these novel reagents should lead to an initial reduction and eventually to a potential total replacement of animals, both large and small, to raise such specific serological materials.

Keywords: Polymers, Nanoparticles, molecular imprinting, influenza virus

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