Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

Learning theory Related Abstracts

2 Estimating Occupancy in Residential Context Using Bayesian Networks for Energy Management

Authors: Stéphane Ploix, Manar Amayri, Hussain Kazimi, Quoc-Dung Ngo

Abstract:

A general approach is proposed to determine occupant behavior (occupancy and activity) in residential buildings and to use these estimates for improved energy management. Occupant behaviour is modelled with a Bayesian Network in an unsupervised manner. This algorithm makes use of domain knowledge gathered via questionnaires and recorded sensor data for motion detection, power, and hot water consumption as well as indoor CO₂ concentration. Two case studies are presented which show the real world applicability of estimating occupant behaviour in this way. Furthermore, experiments integrating occupancy estimation and hot water production control show that energy efficiency can be increased by roughly 5% over known optimal control techniques and more than 25% over rule-based control while maintaining the same occupant comfort standards. The efficiency gains are strongly correlated with occupant behaviour and accuracy of the occupancy estimates.

Keywords: Sensor Networks, Artificial Intelligence, Energy, Management, Optimization, Control, Buildings, Learning theory, Bayesian Methods, knowledge modelling and knowledge based systems

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1 Empirical Evaluation of Game Components Based on Learning Theory: A Preliminary Study

Authors: Seoi Lee, Dongjoo Chin, Heewon Kim

Abstract:

Gamification refers to a technique that applies game elements to non-gaming elements, such as education and exercise, to make people more engaged in these behaviors. The purpose of this study was to identify effective elements in gamification for changing human behaviors. In order to accomplish this purpose, a survey based on learning theory was developed, especially for assessing antecedents and consequences of behaviors, and 8 popular and 8 unpopular games were selected for comparison. A total of 407 adult males and females were recruited via crowdsourcing Internet marketplace and completed the survey, which consisted of 19 questions for antecedent and 14 questions for consequences. Results showed no significant differences in consequence questions between popular and unpopular games. For antecedent questions, popular games are superior to unpopular games in character customization, play type selection, a sense of belonging, patch update cycle, and influence or dominance. This study is significant in that it reveals the elements of gamification based on learning theory. Future studies need to empirically validate whether these factors affect behavioral change.

Keywords: Learning theory, Gamification, behaviorism, Behavior change, antecedent, consequence

Procedia PDF Downloads 70