Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

high density Related Abstracts

3 Enhancement of Mechanical and Biological Properties in Wollastonite Bioceramics by MgSiO3 Addition

Authors: Jae Hong Kim, Sang Cheol Um, Jong Kook Lee

Abstract:

Strong and biocompatible wollastonite (CaSiO3) was fabricated by pressureless sintering at temperature range of 1250~ 1300 ℃ and phase transition of to β-wollastonite with an addition of MgSiO3. Starting pure α-wollastonite powder were prepared by solid state reaction, and MgSiO3 powder was added to α-wollastonite powder to induce the phase transition α to β-wollastonite over 1250℃. Sintered wollastonite samples at 1250℃ with 5 and 10 wt% MgSiO3 were α+β phase and β phase respectively, and showed higher densification rate than that of α or β-wollastonite, which are almost the same as the theoretical density. Hardness and Young’s modulus of sintered wollastonite were dependent on the apparent density and the amount of β-wollastonite. Young’s modulus (78GPa) of β-wollastonite added 10 wt% MgSiO3 was almost double time of sintered α-wollastonite. From the in-vitro test, biphasic (α+β) wollastonite with 5wt% MgSiO3 addition had good bioactivity in simulated body fluid solution.

Keywords: Phase Transition, β-wollastonite, high density, MgSiO3

Procedia PDF Downloads 448
2 House Extension Strategy in High-Density Informal Settlement: A Case Study in Kampung Cikini, Jakarta, Indonesia

Authors: Meidesta Pitria, Akiko Okabe

Abstract:

In high-density informal settlement, extension area at the outside of the houses could primarily happen as a spatial modification response. House extension in high-density informal settlement is not only becoming a physical spatial modification that makes a blur zone between private and public but also supporting the growth and existence of informal economy and other daily activities in both individuals and communities. This research took a case study in an informal settlement named Kampung Cikini, a densely populated area in Central Jakarta. The aim of this study is to identify and clarify house extension as a strategy in dealing with urbanization in an informal settlement. By using the perspective and information from housewives, the analysis is based on the assumption that land ownership transformation and the activities in house extension area influence the different kinds of house extension’s spatial modification and local planning policy in relation with the implementation of house extension strategy. The data collection was done in four sites, two sites are located in outer-wide alley and another two sites are located in inner-narrow alley. In this research, data of 104 housewives in 86 houses were collected through representatives of housewives and local leader of each sites. The research was started from participatory mapping process, deep interview with local leader, and initiated collaboration with housewives community in having a celebration as communal event to cultivate together the issue. This study shows that land ownership, activities, and alley are indispensable in the decision of extension space making. The more permanency status of land ownership the more permanent and various extension could be implemented. However, in some blocks, the existence of origin house or first land owner also has a significant role in coordination and agreement in using and modifying extension space. In outer-wide alley, the existence of more various activities in front area of the houses is significantly related with the chance given by having wider alley, particularly for informal income generating activities. In the inner-narrow alley, limited space in front of the houses affects more negotiations in the community for having more shared spaces, even inside their private space.

Keywords: high density, housewives, informal settlement, house extension, kampung

Procedia PDF Downloads 96
1 District 10 in Tehran: Urban Transformation and the Survey Evidence of Loss in Place Attachment in High Rises

Authors: Roya Morad, W. Eirik Heintz

Abstract:

The identity of a neighborhood is inevitably shaped by the architecture and the people of that place. Conventionally the streets within each neighborhood served as a semi-public-private extension of the private living spaces. The street as a design element formed a hybrid condition that was neither totally public nor private, and it encouraged social interactions. Thus through creating a sense of community, one of the most basic human needs of belonging was achieved. Similar to major global cities, Tehran has undergone serious urbanization. Developing into a capital city of high rises has resulted in an increase in urban density. Although allocating more residential units in each neighborhood was a critical response to the population boom and the limited land area of the city, it also created a crisis in terms of social communication and place attachment. District 10 in Tehran is a neighborhood that has undergone the most urban transformation among the other 22 districts in the capital and currently has the highest population density. This paper will explore how the active streets in district 10 have changed into their current condition of high rises with a lack of meaningful social interactions amongst its inhabitants. A residential building can be thought of as a large group of people. One would think that as the number of people increases, the opportunities for social communications would increase as well. However, according to the survey, there is an indirect relationship between the two. As the number of people of a residential building increases, the quality of each acquaintance reduces, and the depth of relationships between people tends to decrease. This comes from the anonymity of being part of a crowd and the lack of social spaces characterized by most high-rise apartment buildings. Without a sense of community, the attachment to a neighborhood is decreased. This paper further explores how the neighborhood participates to fulfill ones need for social interaction and focuses on the qualitative aspects of alternative spaces that can redevelop the sense of place attachment within the community.

Keywords: Social Communication, Urban Transformation, Place Attachment, Street Life, high density

Procedia PDF Downloads 1