Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

GIS and Remote Sensing Related Abstracts

3 Multi-Temporal Remote Sensing of landscape Dynamics and Pattern Changes in Dire District, Southern Oromia, Ethiopia

Authors: K. Berhanu

Abstract:

Improper land use results in land degradation and decline in agricultural productivity. Hence, in order to get maximum benefits out of land, proper utilization of its resources is inevitable. The present study was aimed at identifying the landcover changes in the study area in the last 25 years and determines the extent and direction of change that has occurred. The study made use of Landsat TM 1986 and 2011 Remote Sensing Satellite Image for analysis to determine the extent and pattern of rangeland change. The results of the landuse/landcover change detection showed that in the last 25 years, 3 major changes were observed, grassland and open shrub-land resource significantly decreased at a rate of 17.1km2/year and 12 km2/year/, respectively. On the other hand in 25 years dense bushland, open bush land, dense shrubland and cultivated land has shown increment in size at a rate of 0.23km2/year,13.5 km2/year, 6.3 km2/year and 0.2 km2/year, respectively within 25 years. The expansion of unpalatable woody species significantly reduced the rangeland size and availability of grasses. The consequence of the decrease in herbaceous biomass production might result in high risk of food insecurity in the area unless proper interventions are made in time.

Keywords: GIS and Remote Sensing, Dire District, land use/land cover, land sat TM

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2 Assessment of Environmental Implications of Rapid Population Growth on Land Use Dynamics: A Case Study of Eleme Local Government Area, Rivers State, Nigeria

Authors: Moses Obenade, Henry U. Okeke, Francis I. Okpiliya, Eugene J. Aniah

Abstract:

Population growth in Eleme has been rapid over the past 75 years with its attendant pressure on the natural resources of the area. Between 1937 and 2006 the population of Eleme grew from 2,528 to 190,194 and is projected to be above 265,707 in 2016 based on an annual growth rate of 3.4%. Using the combined technologies of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing (RS) and Demography techniques as its methodology, this paper examines the environmental implications of rapid population growth on land use dynamics in Eleme between 1986 and 2015. The study reveals that between 1986 and 2006, Built-up area and Farmland increased by 72.67 and 12.77% respectively, while light and thick vegetation recorded a decrease of -6.92 and -61.64% respectively. Water body remains fairly constant with minimal changes. Also, between 2006 and 2015 covering a period of 9 years, Built-up area further increased by 53% with an annual growth rate of 2.32 km2 gaining more land area on the detriment of other land uses. Built-up area has an annual growth rate of 2.32km2 and is expected to increase from 18.67km2 in 2006 to 41.87km2 in 2016.The observed Land used/Land cover dynamics is derived by the demographic characteristics of the Study area. Eleme has a total area of 138km2 out of which the Federal Government of Nigeria compulsorily acquired an estimated area of 59.34km2 for industrial purposes excluding acquisitions by the Rivers State Government. It is evident from the findings of this study that the carrying capacity of Eleme ecosystem is under threat due to the current population growth and land consumption rates. Therefore, measures such as use of appropriate technologies in farming techniques, waste management; investment in family planning and female empowerment, maternal health and education, afforestation programs; and amendment of Land Use Act of 1978 are recommended.

Keywords: GIS and Remote Sensing, Land Use, population growth, Eleme

Procedia PDF Downloads 246
1 Assessing the Impacts of Bridges on the Development of Fluvial Islands Using Remote Sensing and GIS: Case Study on the Islands of Khartoum State up to Sabaloka Gorge, Khartoum State, Sudan

Authors: Anwar Elsadat Elmahal, Ahmed Abdalla

Abstract:

The population in Sudan has recently grown to a significant level, Khartoum city the capital has the major portion of this growth. Khartoum is separated by three Niles and linked by eight bridges to Khartoum North and Omdurman. The construction of these bridges disrupted the natural flow of water and sediments which will consequently be reflected on the geomorphological settings of fluvial islands including erosion and sedimentation patterns. The objective of this study is to monitor and assess the development of fluvial islands in Khartoum State up to Sabaloka Gorge using Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques. Landsat Images captured during the period from 1975-2015 with standard false color and standardized 30 m resolution were found useful in understanding the impacts of bridges on disrupting the fluvial cycle. Consequently, the rates, trends of erosions and deposition, and the development of fluvial islands are explained. GIS provides the-state-of-the-art tools in mapping, delineating the fluvial islands during different periods and in quantifying the changes that occurred to fluvial islands as well as creating the geographic databases for the Islands in Khartoum State. It was found that, the developments, shapes and sizes of the islands are directly affected by the construction of bridges, specifically in the Nile River from Tutti Island to Sabaloka gorge.

Keywords: GIS and Remote Sensing, landsat, fluvial islands, fluvial cycle, Khartoum State, Sabaloka Gorge

Procedia PDF Downloads 184